Warburg Institute Colloquia

Edited by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and volume editor Tim Cornell and Oswyn Murray
July 30, 2014
In 2008-2009 a group of Arnaldo Momigliano’s disciples met at the Warburg Institute to celebrate the centenary of his birth and to recall the great series of seminars held by him from 1967 to 1983: the aim was to explore the significance of his legacy some twenty years after his death, in all the various areas where he made a major contribution. His seminars had opened the eyes of the participants to the meaning of historical research in their different fields, from ancient Jewish, Greek and Roman history and late antiquity to the study of the historiography especially of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The contributors to this volume have all asked how far his influence still determines the future of our various special areas. By...
Edited by Peter Adamson
April 1, 2011
Much as a previous volume published by the Warburg explored the full range of philosophical developments in the 10th century CE, so this collection of 13 papers by leading scholars looks at philosophical literature of the 12th century. Several contributors discuss the most famous thinker of the period, the great commentator Averroes. But the volume casts a wide net, taking in theologians, “philosophical mystics”, and scientists as well as philosophers, and Jewish philosophy as well as Islamic thought. Apart from Averroes, figures emphasized in the volume include al-Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, ‘Abd al-Latif al-Baghdadi, Abu l-Barakat al-Baghdadi and Suhrawardi.
Edited by Maria Pia Donato and Jill Kraye
March 1, 2010
Traditionally thought of as the home of the Counter-Reformation papacy and of the Inquisition, Rome has never been regarded as a major scientific centre. Yet the new research presented here, much of it based on previously unstudied archival material, highlights the special character of science and medicine in the city and its institutions: academies (above all, the famous Accademia dei Lincei), hospitals, libraries, monasteries, universities and courts, as well as the papal Curia and the Congregation of the Index. The approach is thoroughly interdisciplinary, ranging over many disciplines - engineering, architecture, chemistry, botany, mathematics, astronomy and geography - and covering a diversity of topics, from atlases and anatomical...
Edited by Elizabeth McGrath and Jean Michel Massing
July 23, 2012
This volume explores the imagery of slaves and enslavement – white as well as black – in early modern Europe.Long before the abolitionist movement took up the theme, European art abounded in images of slaves – chained, subjected, subdued figures. Often these enslaved figures were meant to be symbolic, for slavery was widely invoked as a metaphor in both religious and secular contexts. The ancient Roman iconography of triumphalism, with its trophies and caryatids, provided a crucial impetus to this imagery, particularly for Renaissance artists who developed their own variations. Here the use of classical models had a peculiar force, since nudity, the attribute of antique heroes and idealized abstractions, was the mark of the Mediterranean...
Edited by Michael Mallett and Nicholas Mann
May 31, 1996
ContentsE W KENT: The Young Lorenzo, 1449– 1469 ..... 1– 22KATE LOWE: Lorenzo's 'Presence' at Churches, Convents and Shrines in and outside Florence ..... 23– 36LINDA PELLECCHIA: Designing the Via Laura Palace: Giuliano da Sangallo, the Medici, and Time ..... 37– 63ALISON WRIGHT: A Portrait for the Visit of Galeazzo Maria Sforza to Florence in 1471 ..... 65– 92E. B. FRYDE: Lorenzo's Greek Manuscripts, and in Particular his own Commissions ..... 93– 104PAOLA VENTRONE: Lorenzo's Politica festive ..... 105– 116NERIDA NEWBIGIN: Politics in the Sacre Rappresentazioni of Lorenzo's Florence ..... 117– 130KRISTEN LIPPINCOTT: The Art of Cartography in Fifteenth– Century Florence ..... 131– 149JILL KRAYE: Lorenzo and the...
Edited by Paul Taylor and Francois Quiviger
February 16, 2001
This volume contains most of the papers given at a colloquium held at the Institute in 1997. It provides a study of the concept of composition in European art and art literature from the middle ages to the early twentieth century. Some authors are concerned to show the extent to which writers on art before 1880 would have been able to think of a work of art in the terms put forward by modernist theorists like Maurice Denis, Wassily Kandinsky and Clement Greenberg, as a flat surface, covered with colours, lines and forms arranged in an aesthetically pleasing way. Other authors aim to show how artists and theorists conceived of composition before the modern period, by describing some of the implications and connotations of the concept within...
Edited by Paul Taylor
September 1, 2008
Contributors to the conference held at the Warburg Institute in June 2005 were asked to consider the question: how, if at all, can we investigate the iconographic themes of cultures that have left us few or no textual records? Some have responded directly while others have expanded the terms of debate but we hope that all the essays included in this book will be of interest to art historians, archaeologists and anthropologists who are faced with the problem of interpreting visual artefacts that have become divorced from the cultural contexts in which they once had meaning.
Edited by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and volume editor Kathleen W. Christian, Clare E. L. Guest, and Claudia Wedepohl
July 30, 2014
This interdisciplinary collection of essays, presented at the Warburg Institute in 2009, considers the identity of the Muses in Antiquity and through centuries of their afterlife, tracing their religious, educational and philosophical meaning in classical Greece and their subsequent transformation and re-interpretation in a range of post-classical contexts. Individual contributors consider the invocation of the Muses in different places and at different times by those in search of inspiration, immortality and fame. The volume addresses the concept of the Muses from the perspective of philology, philosophy, art history, antiquarianism and musicology, from Antiquity to the Middle Ages and Early Modern period. It concludes with a discussion...
Edited by Dirk Miert
November 1, 2013
The case studies in this volume juxtapose instances of knowledge exchange across a variety of fields usually studied in isolation: anthropology, medicine, botany, epigraphy, astronomy, geography, philosophy and chronology. In their letters, scientists and scholars tried to come to grips with the often unclear epistemological status of an ‘observation’, a term which covered a wide semantic field, ranging from acts of perceiving to generalized remarks on knowledge. Observations were associated with descriptions, transcriptions, copies, drawings, casts and coordinates, and they frequently took into account the natural, material, linguistic, historical, religious and social contexts. Early modern scholars were well aware of the transformations...

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