Warburg Institute Colloquia

Edied Lluis Cabre, Alejandro Coroleu, and Jill Kraye
February 20, 2013
The papers in this volume study the early influence of Petrarch in France and in the Crown of Aragon. They focus, in particular, on Bernat Metge (c. 1348–1413), a prominent member of the Aragonese Royal Chancery, who produced a Catalan adaptation of Petrarch’s Griseldis (from Seniles, XVII, 3–4) around 1388, making a Latin work of Petrarch available for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. Moreover, Metge’s fragmentary Apology(1395?) and his Dream (1399) reveal familiarity with Petrarch’sSecretum, Familiares and possibly De remediis. His fine imitation of Petrarchan models and his interest in classical literature put Metge on a par with contemporaneous writers elsewhere in Europe. This book aims to introduce a wider...
Edied Alessandro Scafi
June 6, 2016
The Cosmography of Paradise: The Other World from Ancient Mesopotamia to Medieval Europe considers the general theme of paradise from various comparative perspectives. The focus has been on the way the relationship between ‘the other world’ and the structure of the whole cosmos has been viewed in different ages and traditions around the Mediterranean basin, spanning from the ancient Near East to medieval Europe. Scholars coming from different fields discuss in this volume the various ways the relationship between paradise and the general features of the universe has been viewed within their own field of work. The historical formation of the notion of paradise, defined as a perfect state beyond time and space, relied heavily upon a...
Edied Thomas Frangenberg and Rodney Palmer and pepedfplicin Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye
June 1, 2013
This book explores biographical, fictional and psychological approaches to Leonardo. What light do these different narratives shed on Leonardo himself, and on the cultures in which they were written?  Why has Leonardo’s life story attracted so much attention? How did anecdotes about Leonardo affect Leonardesque art theory? When and why were myths of Leonardo created, and in what ways have they biased responses to his art?
Edied Zur Shalev and Charles Burnett
May 1, 2011
The rediscovery of Ptolemy’s Geography has long been hailed as a key moment in the emergence of Renaissance culture, symbolizing a new rational spatiality, and preparing the way for the Age of Discovery. And yet, the process of the Geography’s introduction, integration and impact in western Europe, as the essays in this volume collectively suggest, was more complex and less predictable than has been traditionally assumed. Whereas previously Ptolemy’s maps attracted most scholarly attention, in this volume the textual tradition of the Geography – Ptolemy’s text, added prefaces, annotations and treatises – stand at the centre. Bringing together a wealth of previously unexplored sources and contexts, the essays examine the...
Edied Christopher Ligota and Letizia Panizza
March 1, 2007
The essays in this volume bring together, in a revised and updated form, papers presented at a colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in December 1995. As the title suggests, Lucian is considered both in his contemporary environment and in his Nachleben, and the overall purpose is to show the freshness and resilience of the presence in European culture of an author whose well-aimed satirical wit has, from his time to ours, led to defensive attempts at repression and expulsion from the cultural canon. As Kurt Tucholsky put it, nothing was sacred to Lucian, which makes him a 'friend, cousin, brother, comrade at arms'.
Edied Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and vlmeedi Tim Cornell and Oswyn Murray
July 30, 2014
In 2008-2009 a group of Arnaldo Momigliano’s disciples met at the Warburg Institute to celebrate the centenary of his birth and to recall the great series of seminars held by him from 1967 to 1983: the aim was to explore the significance of his legacy some twenty years after his death, in all the various areas where he made a major contribution. His seminars had opened the eyes of the participants to the meaning of historical research in their different fields, from ancient Jewish, Greek and Roman history and late antiquity to the study of the historiography especially of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The contributors to this volume have all asked how far his influence still determines the future of our various special areas. By...
Edied Charles Burnett and Peter Dronke
July 31, 1998
This volume offers a comprehensive view of Hildegard of Bingen's manifold achievements, her intellectual background and her reception in the later Middle Ages. It brings together, with full documentation, the contributions of an international group of medievalists, from diverse disciplines, to the colloquium held at the Warburg Institute on 17– 18 November 1995.Three of the essays are devoted to the cultural landscape in which Hildegard lived and worked – her relation to the writings of the Fathers, to the schools of her own time, and to the prophetic tradition. Two others examine how, after Hildegard's death, she came to be revered as saint and prophet, and two shed new light on the transmission of her manuscripts and of the illuminations...
Edied Maria Pia Donato and Jill Kraye
March 1, 2010
Traditionally thought of as the home of the Counter-Reformation papacy and of the Inquisition, Rome has never been regarded as a major scientific centre. Yet the new research presented here, much of it based on previously unstudied archival material, highlights the special character of science and medicine in the city and its institutions: academies (above all, the famous Accademia dei Lincei), hospitals, libraries, monasteries, universities and courts, as well as the papal Curia and the Congregation of the Index. The approach is thoroughly interdisciplinary, ranging over many disciplines - engineering, architecture, chemistry, botany, mathematics, astronomy and geography - and covering a diversity of topics, from atlases and anatomical...
Edied Peter Adamson
April 1, 2011
Much as a previous volume published by the Warburg explored the full range of philosophical developments in the 10th century CE, so this collection of 13 papers by leading scholars looks at philosophical literature of the 12th century. Several contributors discuss the most famous thinker of the period, the great commentator Averroes. But the volume casts a wide net, taking in theologians, “philosophical mystics”, and scientists as well as philosophers, and Jewish philosophy as well as Islamic thought. Apart from Averroes, figures emphasized in the volume include al-Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, ‘Abd al-Latif al-Baghdadi, Abu l-Barakat al-Baghdadi and Suhrawardi.
Edied Michael Mallett and Nicholas Mann
May 31, 1996
ContentsE W KENT: The Young Lorenzo, 1449– 1469 ..... 1– 22KATE LOWE: Lorenzo's 'Presence' at Churches, Convents and Shrines in and outside Florence ..... 23– 36LINDA PELLECCHIA: Designing the Via Laura Palace: Giuliano da Sangallo, the Medici, and Time ..... 37– 63ALISON WRIGHT: A Portrait for the Visit of Galeazzo Maria Sforza to Florence in 1471 ..... 65– 92E. B. FRYDE: Lorenzo's Greek Manuscripts, and in Particular his own Commissions ..... 93– 104PAOLA VENTRONE: Lorenzo's Politica festive ..... 105– 116NERIDA NEWBIGIN: Politics in the Sacre Rappresentazioni of Lorenzo's Florence ..... 117– 130KRISTEN LIPPINCOTT: The Art of Cartography in Fifteenth– Century Florence ..... 131– 149JILL KRAYE: Lorenzo and the...

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