Warburg Institute Colloquia

Edited by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and volume editor Kathleen W. Christian, Clare E. L. Guest, and Claudia Wedepohl
July 30, 2014
This interdisciplinary collection of essays, presented at the Warburg Institute in 2009, considers the identity of the Muses in Antiquity and through centuries of their afterlife, tracing their religious, educational and philosophical meaning in classical Greece and their subsequent transformation and re-interpretation in a range of post-classical contexts. Individual contributors consider the invocation of the Muses in different places and at different times by those in search of inspiration, immortality and fame. The volume addresses the concept of the Muses from the perspective of philology, philosophy, art history, antiquarianism and musicology, from Antiquity to the Middle Ages and Early Modern period. It concludes with a discussion...
Edited by Dirk Miert
November 1, 2013
The case studies in this volume juxtapose instances of knowledge exchange across a variety of fields usually studied in isolation: anthropology, medicine, botany, epigraphy, astronomy, geography, philosophy and chronology. In their letters, scientists and scholars tried to come to grips with the often unclear epistemological status of an ‘observation’, a term which covered a wide semantic field, ranging from acts of perceiving to generalized remarks on knowledge. Observations were associated with descriptions, transcriptions, copies, drawings, casts and coordinates, and they frequently took into account the natural, material, linguistic, historical, religious and social contexts. Early modern scholars were well aware of the transformations...
Edited by W. F. Ryan and Charles Burnett
February 1, 2006
The present volume arose from a colloquium on magic and divination intended to apply the study of the history of the classical tradition to the specific area of magic. Magic is interpreted in a very broad sense, and the book includes discussions of Neoplatonic theurgy, Hermetic astrological talismans, the occult activities of oracles and witches, demon-possession, popular beliefs and party tricks. While several articles look at magic in the Graeco-Roman tradition, others deal with practices in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Byzantium and Russia. The emphasis is on showing transmission through time, and across cultural and linguistic borders, and the continuing importance of classical or ancient authorities among writers of more recent periods....
Edited by Robert Black, Jill Kraye, and Laura Nuvoloni
May 2, 2016
Albinia de la Mare (1932–2001), OBE, FBA, Professor of Palaeography at King's College London, was one of the last century's outstanding palaeographers and the world's leading authority on Italian Renaissance manuscripts. In November 2011 a conference was held at King's College and the Warburg Institute to honour her memory, and this volume offers revised versions of most of the papers read on that occasion, as well as three additional contributions. Tilly de la Mare had exceptionally wide interests, including key individuals involved in manuscript and literary production, as represented here by studies on Vespasiano da Bisticci, Sozomeno da Pistoia, Matteo Contugi da Volterra, Lorenzo di Francesco Guidetti, Giorgio Antonio Vespucci,...
Edited by Charles Burnett and Nicholas Mann
December 1, 2005
This volume attempts to bring together, to our knowledge for the first time, aspects of the whole of the long history of Latin as written in Great Britain. The papers explore the use of Latin in different contexts at different periods, from the early Middle Ages until the twentieth century. They range over the subjects of philology, philosophy, scholarship, humanism and teaching methods, with separate chapters for Scotland and Wales. This book arose from a conference sponsored by the Fondazione Cassamarca, which also contributed generously to its publication.ContentsMichael Lapidge: How ‘English’ is Pre-Conquest Latin.Peter Dronke Arbor eterna: A Ninth-Century Welsh Latin Sequence.Maria Amalia D’Aronco: How ‘English’ is Anglo-Saxon...
Edited by Dilwyn Knox and Nuccio Ordine
December 12, 2011
The essays collected in this volume have been written by friends and colleagues in memory of Giovanni Aquilecchia, Professor of Italian at the University of London. They cover a wide range of subjects, reflecting Aquilecchia’s interests in Giordano Bruno, Pietro Aretino, Torquato Tasso and Renaissance learning and literature in general. They are all works of original scholarship, with new insights into the subjects that they treat. The volume includes a biographical essay by Laura Lepschy and Dilwyn Knox. Most were delivered in a preliminary form at a conference held at the Warburg Institute in memory of Aquilecchia.
Anna Ayse Akasoy and edited by Charles Burnett and Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim
November 1, 2013
Rashid al-Din (1274-1318), physician and powerful minister at the court of the Ilkhans, was a key figure in the cosmopolitan milieu in Iran under Mongol rule. He set up an area in the vicinity of the court where philosophers, doctors, astronomers, and historians from different parts of Eurasia lived together, exchanged ideas and produced books. He was himself involved in collecting, collating and editing these materials, and the substantial oeuvre that resulted is a gold-mine for anyone studying the transmission of knowledge across cultures. By bringing together contributions from the fields of the history of religion, medicine, science and art, this book examines the cultural dynamics of Rashid al-Din’s circle. It addresses questions such...
Edited by Luca Bianchi, Simon Gilson, and Jill Kraye
December 1, 2016
This volume is based on an international colloquium held at the Warburg Institute, London, on 21–2 June 2013, and entitled ‘Philosophy and Knowledge in the Renaissance: Interpreting Aristotle in the Vernacular’. It situates and explores vernacular Aristotelianism in a broad chronological context, with a geographical focus on Italy. The disciplines covered include political thought, ethics, poetics, rhetoric, logic, natural philosophy, cosmology, meteorology and metaphysics; and among the genres considered are translations, popularizing commentaries, dialogues and works targeted at women. The wide-ranging and rich material presented in the volume is intended to stimulate scholars to develop this promising area of research still...
Edited by Rembrandt Duits and Francois Quiviger
March 1, 2010
Jean Seznec's La survivance des dieux antiques was first published at the Warburg Institute in 1940 and translated into English as The Survival of the Pagan Gods in 1953 It is a classic survey of the afterlife of the deities of classical Antiquity in art and literature during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. This volume of essays is the product of a conference held at the Warburg Institute in 2004, in collaboration with the French research group Polymnia. It presents the current state of scholarship regarding a number of the themes set out by Seznec, covering areas from medieval astronomy to sixteenth-century allegory, and charting the course of the long-term iconographical traditions of mythological figures as well as discussing...
Edited by Felicity Harley-McGowan and Henry Maguire
November 28, 2017
The essays collected in this volume publish the proceedings of a colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in January 2013 to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of Ernst Kitzinger. His work has been, and still is, fundamentally influential on the present-day discipline of art history in a wide range of topics. The first half of the book is primarily biographical, with papers covering his extraordinary career, which began in Germany, Italy and England in the tumultuous years preceding World War II, before leading to internment in Australia and, eventually, to America. The second half of the book is devoted to assessments of Kitzinger’s scholarship, including his concern with the theory of style, with the early medieval art of...

Pages