Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Lynn S. Fotheringham
December 2, 2013
This innovative approach to Cicero's persuasive language analyses the style and structure of one of his important speeches in more detail than has ever been done before.It applies ideas from modern linguistics (sentential topic, lexical patterning, interactional discourse), and explores the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis, made easier by modern computing power, in the areas of syntax and vocabulary.The result is a reading of the Pro Milone as a unified text, whether aimed at persuading the jury to acquit Milo or at persuading a wider audience that Milo should have been acquitted. This reading not only contributes to our understanding of late republican discourse, but also suggests a new methodology for...
Edited by Fiona C. Macfarlane and Catherine Morgan
November 8, 2010
From Caria to English country houses and iconography to architectural reconstruction, over the past 40 years Geoffrey Waywell has transformed our understanding of Greek sculpture and opened the way for new generations of scholars.In this volume, a celebration of his career on the occasion of his retirement, past and present students, friends and colleagues explore ideas, monuments and regions which reflect the great breadth of his research interests.Essays range from iconographical studies of Myron's Discobolos, to the reconstruction of the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, an exploration of the role of attribution, and a celebration of one of the works saved for the nation on Geoffrey Waywell's advice, the Jennings dog now in the British Museum.
Edited by Richard Sorabji
August 13, 2007
Between 100 BC and 200 AD Rome took up the ongoing philosophy of the Greeks. The extraordinary wealth of ideas is reflected in the four main schools, Platonists, Aristotelians, Stoics and Epicureans, while there are also Pythagoreans who blend with the Platonists there are Pyrrhonian sceptics and there are Cynics who cannot easily be called a school. Then there are the individuals who call for separate treatment. These include Cicero Philo of Alexandria – a commentator on the books of Moses in the Old Testament – and two of the West’s greatest-ever scientists, Ptolemy in astronomy and Galen in medicine.There were major new developments in all the schools but despite its importance the large number of schools and individuals has itself...
Edited by J.J. Wilkes
November 1, 2003
This volume places on record the proceedings of the colloquium held in honour of Dr. Margaret Roxan at the Institute of Classical Studies in May 2002. The theme of the colloquium was the written record of the Roman army, though the scope of the contributions embraced both historical and archaeological topics. Central to the discussions were the military diplomas recording grants of citizenship and other privileges to various categories of military personnel. The study and publication of these important records, of which several hundred are known, was Margaret Roxan’s life work. Over thirty years she worked as a dedicated scholar with minimal help from a few institutions. Her three edited collections of newly-found diplomas have acquired a...
Elena Isayev
February 1, 2007
A traveller today on a journey through the mountainous landscape of ancient Lucania would find it difficult to believe the high density of settlement which this corner of south-west Italy sustained in the fourth century BC. Networks incorporating much of the peninsula, Greece, Sicily, Epirus, Macedon and Carthage all found a foothold here. Ancient narratives, largely focusing on military contexts, give little sense of the nature of activity in the area, but the remains of material culture provide an image of thriving communities, not organised on the city-state model, which were active participants in the culture and power struggles of the Mediterranean in the period before Roman hegemony. This study brings together historical and...
Edited by Andrew Gardner, Edward Herring, and Kathryn Lomas
November 4, 2013
Questions of ethnic and cultural identities are central to the contemporary understanding of the Roman world.The expansion of Rome across Italy, the Mediterranean, and beyond entailed encounters with a wide range of peoples. Many of these had well-established pre-conquest ethnic identities which can be compared with Roman perceptions of them. In other cases, the ethnicity of peoples conquered by Rome has been perceived almost entirely through the lenses of Roman ethnographic writing and administrative structures.The formation of such identities, and the shaping of these identities by Rome, was a vital part of the process of Roman imperialism. Comparisons across the empire reveal some similarities in the processes of identity formation...
Edited by Richard Sorabji
April 5, 2010
A substantially revised and supplemented edition of the collected volume originally published, by Duckworth, in 1987.
Edited by Alison Cooley
December 12, 2000
With contributions from Tim Benton, Amanda Collins, Alison E. Cooley, Colin Cunningham, Glenys Davies, Wolfgang Hameter, Mark Handley, Jeremy Knight, Onno van Nijf, Graham Oliver and William Stenhouse.The Afterlife of Inscriptions explores the changing uses of ancient inscriptions from classical to modern times and the ways in which their lives have been prolonged beyond their initial span. It explores the changing uses of ancient inscriptions from classical to modern times and the ways in which their lives have been prolonged beyond their initial span. Two chapters explore inscriptions in their ancient settings, assessing the impact of location upon inscribed monuments set up on the Capitol Hill at Rome and in the town of...
William Stenhouse
July 4, 2005
Reading inscriptions and writing Ancient History shows how the work of a group of scholars active in Rome in the middle of the sixteenth century redefined the scope and nature of historical writing.Fascinated by the remains of the Classical world and particularly by inscriptions in stone, they began to collect and compare inscriptions, creating systems of classification and ways of representing their finds that shaped all subsequent attempts to do the same. They then began to question the value of inscriptions as historical sources and realised that by looking at them as objects B rather than simply as texts written on a particular durable medium B, they could extract more information, particularly when they examined the variations in...
Jonathan Powell
November 1, 2007
In the ancient world Classical rhetoric and its practices raised major ethical doubts and questions which have continued to affect – even to prejudice – our judgment of orators and oratory today. One of the key components of practical oratory was rational argument. The six chapters in this volume examine different aspects of the role of rational argument in Classical oratory and rhetoric and its later tradition. Michael Gagarin discusses the role of argumentation in the works of Antiphon, the earliest Greek orator whose continuous texts survive. Christos Kremmydas analyses the argumentative strategies in a political speech of Demosthenes, the attack on the law of Leptines (Demosthenes 20). Two chapters then focus on Cicero: Jakob Wisse...

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