Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

O Krzyszkowska
March 1, 2005
Seals and sealings provide an extremely rich source of evidence for the Aegean Bronze Age. They are truly monuments in miniature, offering insights into art and iconography, craft and technology, social status, administration and more besides. Aegean Seals is the first comprehensive overview of this fascinating subject, tracing the development of seals and sealing practices from the third millennium to the end of the Bronze Age, with particular emphasis on the great palace civilizations of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.Copiously illustrated, this study combines original research with critical analysis of specialist literature and presents many recent discoveries.
Edited by Christopher Carey and Michael Edwards
December 2, 2013
Some two and a half millennia ago, in the summer of 490 BC, a small army of 9,000 Athenians, supported only be a thousand troops from Plataea, faced and overcame the might of the Persian army of King Darius I on the plain of Marathon.While this was only the beginning of the Persian Wars, and the Greeks as a while would face a far greater threat to their freedom a decade later, the victory at Marathon had untold effects on the morale, confidence, and self-esteem of the Athenians, who would commemorate their finest hour in art and literature for centuries to come.This volume, which includes twenty-one papers originally presented at a colloquium hosted by the Faculty of Philology at the University of Peloponnese, Kalamata in 2010 to mark the...
Edited by Edith Hall and Phiroze Vasunia
June 7, 2010
Edited by Edward Bispham, Greg Rowe, and Elaine Matthews
December 3, 2007
The new millennium sees both Pliny the Elder and his massive encyclopaedic Natural History being studied more seriously and holistically than at any time in the preceding century. The essays in this volume, which honour the seminal work of Barbara Levick on the politics and society of imperial Rome, above all in the period of Pliny’s life and literary activity further this re-assessment. They consider aspects of Pliny’s life and output which have not so far received serious attention. These include his value as a source for the kings of Rome and their achievements; his attitude to astronomy and natural wonders, to gentilician commemoration, philosophical sects, Roman dress and coinage; and his moral judgements on the fall of the Republic....
William D. Furley and volume editor Richard Sorabji
October 1, 1996
No image available
a Cooley
December 12, 2000
With contributions from Edward Bispham, Guy Bradley, Alison E. Cooley, Fay Glinister, Valerie Hope, Mark Pobjoy and Benet Salway.The Epigraphic Landscape presents a series of case-studies in which a new generation of scholars examines the significance of interpreting inscriptions in terms of their topographical context and physical appearance.Some chapters focus on a genre of inscription – honorific building and funerary – whilst others discuss a single text such as the Rapino Bronze and the album of Canusium. This approach reveals the contribution of inscribed monuments to the transformation of towns and countryside and the impact of Rome on the landscape of the rest of Italy.The integration of epigraphic literary archaeological and...
Edited by Christos Kremmydas, Jonathan Powell, and Lene Rubinstein
November 4, 2013
This volume brings together six papers relating to oratory and orators in public fora of Classical Greece and Rome.Edwards and Bers explore aspects of oratorical delivery in the Athenian courts and Assembly, including the demands placed on orators by the physical settings. Tempest examines the conceptions of oratorical competence and incompetence, particularly in respect of performance, as they are implied in Cicero’s criticisms of the rival prosecutor in the trial of Verres.Papers by Karambelas and Powell look at evidence for the importance of advocacy in the Second Sophistic and the late Roman Empire respectively.In an introduction, the editors discuss recurrent themes connected with the orator’s competence and performance, while the...
Edited by Verity Harte, M.M McCabe, and Robert W. Sharples
January 10, 2011
Plato is perhaps the most readable of all philosophers. Recent scholarship on Plato has focused attention on the dramatic and literary form through which Plato presents his philosophy, an integral part of that philosophy.The papers in this volume for the first time consider Aristotle and the Stoics as readers of Plato. That these successors were influenced by the thought of Plato is a commonplace: the ‘whole of western philosophy is a series of footnotes to Plato’.Arising from Institute of Classical Studies Research Seminars in 2004-5 and 2005-6, the papers in this volume rather consider whether and how the philosophical concerns of these later thinkers were served were served by close reading of Plato, through inter-textual...
Edited by Chiara Thumiger
November 19, 2007
Hidden paths analyses the representation of character in Greek tragedy, focusing on one of the most important and controversial theatre plays of all times the Bacchae. Euripides’ last play has always been a favourite, enjoying an enormous success for centuries on and off the stage. This book argues that in the representation of characters in the play we can find a development in the view of self and representation of man. This development, which is also to be partly traced in the works of Sophocles and in earlier plays by Euripides, finds a fuller expression in the Bacchae and culminates in the catastrophe of ignorance and incommunicability which has Pentheus at its centre. The construction of character in the text and the view of...
Mohammad Nafissi
June 21, 2005
For over a century the foundations of Athenian political economy have been debated by scholarly camps broadly described as primitivist/substantivist, modernist and Marxist and involving political economists, sociologists and anthropologists as well as historians and classicists.Ancient Athens and modern ideology demonstrates the dialectic of intellectual and substantive history and offers a consensual resolution to the debate by examining the interplay of values, theories and evidence in the contributions of Max Weber (1864-1920), Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) and Moses Finley (1912-86), widely recognised as successive champions of the primitivist cause. Pursuing Finley’s own ‘official’ account of his intellectual roots and hegemonic...

Pages