Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Volume editor Anastasia Bakogianni
December 9, 2013
ContentsVolume 1. Introduction: in dialogue with the past / Anastasia BakogianniSection 1. Theoretical approaches and concerns. Chapter 1. The audience in classical reception studies. The problem of the spectators: ancient and modern / Lorna HardwickGreek tragedy and the modern director / Helen EastmanChapter 2. Reception and the source text. Hallucination, drunkenness, and mirrors: ancient reception of modern drama / Chiara ThumigerThrowing out the menos with the bath water: the Sophoclean text vs Peter Stein's Electra (2007) / Efimia D. KarakantzaSection 2. The classical past in Hellas. Chapter 3. Modern Greek performance reception. All the king's patriots? The Persians within the walls of nineteenth-century Athens / Gonda Van SteenAt...
Edited by M.H. Crawford
January 2, 2012
Imagines Italicae, edited by M. H. Crawford and colleagues, is the outcome of a research project based in the combined library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies and of the Institute, beginning in 2002 and initially supported by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.  The empire created by Rome underlies many of the structures of modern Europe, and that empire in turn was in its early stages the joint creation of Rome and the other peoples of Italy. Almost the only records left by those peoples themselves consist of the texts they inscribed and the coinages they produced. Imagines Italicae provides for the first time a complete corpus of those texts which are in one or other of the Italic languages, accompanied by photographs...
Edited by Michael Fulford and Emma Durham
October 4, 2013
Mass produced at a variety of locations, principally in Gaul and Germany, between the beginning of the first century and the mid third century CE, Gallo-Roman terra sigillata was consumed in very large quantities across the western provinces of the Roman Empire.The large number of records – over 425,000 – now published inNames on Terra Sigillata – the potters, their individual name dies, the associated forms, and the numbers recovered from find  sites – have provided an international resource for fresh, quantitatively-based approaches to the study of terra sigillata, as presented here in Seeing Red.Twenty-six essays by leading international scholars in the field cover a range of themes including: the organization of...
Edited by John North and Peter Mack
July 20, 2018
Plutarch’s writings have had a varied reception history from when he was writing in the second century BCE down to today. This volume starts from what may be a translation into the Syriac dialect of a lost Plutarch essay; continues with a tribute from a leading scholar of the later Byzantine period; and follows the centuries of sustained enthusiasm from the Renaissance to the eighteenth century. This period started once a translation into Latin had become available, and ended when scholars in the nineteenth century lowered Plutarch’s reputation as historian, biographer, philosopher, and stylist. By the end of the century, he came to symbolize in the eyes of Tolstoy precisely what history should not be. Both the causes of the...
Edited by Vassiliki Kampourelli
July 14, 2016
This book presents a critical application of semiotic models to Greek tragic space. It thus reappraises certain aspects of the tragic texts themselves by illuminating the semantics of space, that is, the ways in which space may contribute to the creation of meaning. After the formulation of a working model appropriate to the examination of space in Greek tragedy, an analysis of the proposed categories of tragic space follows. The architectural space of tragedy is then examined with particular reference to the ways in which it finds expression in the Theatre of Dionysus in Athens. Drawing widely on the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripedes, the focus turns to the interactions between the proposed categories of tragic space.
Edited by Paul Holder
June 9, 2006
Roman Military Diplomas V presents 154 diplomas, and incorporates them into the updated chronologies witness lists and indexes which are a key part of the Roman Military Diplomas series.A few of the diplomas were prepared by the late Margaret Roxan and some others were found after her death in preparation. Otherwise, the intention has been to bring together diplomas published by the end of 2003. But the large number included in this volume also reflects the active interest of collectors and the results of metal detecting. The lively market in diplomas has, however, also had less benign consequences and the volume has an important appendix on the production of fakes.The volume continues Margaret Roxan’s Roman...
Edited by Douglas L. Cairns and Laurel Fulkerson
May 4, 2015
Emotion in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds is now an established field of research in classical studies, but so far scholars have made surprisingly few attempts to investigate the emotions of the two cultures in comparative terms.In this innovative and timely collection, nine leading scholars make a start on that project. Topics include: differences between the Greek and Roman emotional repertoires; the semantic fields and scripts covered by comparable Greek and Latin terms; the impact of bilingualism; the fate of emotion terms in translation; the way Roman authors deal with the emotional aspects of their Greek literary models; Greek and Roman views of the emotional character of their counterparts in the other culture.
Edited by Ulrike Roth
July 5, 2010
By the Sweat of Your Brow brings together the contributions of seven scholars from the UK and the European continent on different aspects of the socio-economic setting of Roman slavery.Individual chapters discuss the slave chapter of Diocletian’s Edict on Maximum Prices, the relationship between slave and free labour, the status of managerial slaves such as vilici and dispensatores, the use of legal sources for our understanding of the role of slavery in Roman society, the unchanging nature of slave prices from classical Athens and late antique Rome, the similarity in discourse and reality of the functions carried out by estate managers in ancient Rome and modern slave and serf societies, and, last, the structural relationship between...
Edited by Christopher Stray
June 4, 2007
Classical Books explores the interface between the history of books and the history of classical scholarship. Its contributors investigate the background to the production of texts, editions, histories and dictionaries many of which are now taken for granted by scholars. Abandoned authors blind alleys, false starts and fierce competition: Classical Books takes us behind the placid facades on library shelves to the processes of commissioning, writing, editing, design and printing which led to the publication of the books we use. Some of the books discussed were the work of major figures in nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholarship B Jowett, Murray, Jebb, Wilamowitz B but many lesser-known scholars also feature in these...
Edited by Michael Crawford
December 1, 1995

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