Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Volume editor J.G.F. Powell and J.A. North
December 15, 2001
Edited by Christopher Stray and Graham Whitaker
May 4, 2015
This special Bulletin Supplement contains seven essays which deepen and extend our knowledge of classical reception and the history of scholarship. Two of them deal with books: John Davies examines a little-known life of the tyrant Agathocles of Syracuse published in the 1660s in which the more recent ‘tyrant’, Oliver Cromwell, is targeted, while Christian Flow surveys the agendas and self-images of Latin lexicographers from the Estiennes in the sixteenth century to the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, still in progress.Three essays are devoted to classical journals: Graham Whitaker surveys German nineteenth-century periodicals in relation to F. A. Wolf’s conception of Alterthumswissenschaft; Ward Briggs gives an account of The American Journal...
Edited by Peter Agócs, Christopher Carey, and Richard Rawles
June 1, 2012
A collection of distinguished scholars examine different moments in the victory ode’s reception history, from the lifetime of Pindar and Bacchylides themselves through the Roman empire and the Middle Ages to the modern world, in a variety of texts and in differing cultural contexts.
Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
August 4, 2008
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
Edited by G Manuwald
December 15, 2016
Cicero was one of the most prolific and productive figures from ancient Rome, active as both a politician and a writer. As yet however modern scholarship does not do justice to the sheer range of his later influence. This volume publishes papers from a conference which aimed to enlarge the basis for the study of Cicero’s reception, by examining in detail new aspects of its variety. The conference was held in May 2015, and was jointly organized by the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute, and the Department of Greek and Latin at University College London.   The book presents twelve case studies on the reception of ‘Cicero the writer’ and ‘Cicero the man’, ranging from thirteenth-century Italy to...
Edited by John Davison, Frances Muecke, and Peter Wilson
March 31, 2006
This volume vividly demonstrates the richness and wide scope of contemporary engagement with Greek drama in scholarship and performance.Key studies of the interaction between performance, politics and society range from the detection of Sophocles' infiltration of the culture through different kinds of evidence B not a linear narrative but a 'mosaic' B to modern performance in South Africa. Gender issues explored include Euripides' interest in female experience, especially the subjection of young women to male violence, and a study of representations in tragedy of homosexuality and pederasty.The role of drama, both tragedy and comedy, in the creation of Athenian identity includes a review of the way that dramatists used the Trojan War to...
Edited by William D. Furley
April 30, 2015
Menander set Perikeiromene, or the ‘Woman with shorn head’ in Corinth, famous for its beautiful women, at a time when the city's troubles were at their height owing to the Macedonian conquest of Greece. The story reflects in miniature some of the turbulence of the times. A mercenary soldier Polemon returns home from service to discover, as he thinks, that his girl, Glykera, has found another lover. In a fit of jealous rage he shears off her hair and goes off to drown his sorrows with companions. Glykera promptly moves out from Polemon's house to the neighbour's house, in which her purported new lover Moschion lives. But all is not as it seems...Typically for the genre of New Comedy, Menander takes his characters to the brink in this lively...
David W. J. Gill
April 4, 2011
‘...what we wanted was to connect ourselves directly with the heart of Hellenic culture so that its very lifeblood might flow through our veins, and this we should gain by the establishment of the school at Athens’(J.B. Lightfoot, Bishop of Durham)The British School at Athens opened in 1886 ‘to promote all researches and studies’ which could ‘advance the knowledge of Hellenic history, literature, and art from the earliest age to the present day’. Over the next 30 years the School initiated a major programme of excavations, initially on Cyprus, then at Megalopolis, on Melos, and at Sparta. School students took part in the work of the Cretan Exploration Fund and in the major regional surveys of the Asia Minor Exploration Fund.Most of the...
Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
April 4, 2011
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
Edited by P Mack and John North
December 22, 2017
Virgil has always been copied, studied, imitated, and revered as perhaps the greatest poet of the Latin language. He has been centrally important to the transmission of the classical tradition, and has played a unique role in European education. In recognition of the richness of his reception the fourth conferences in the joint Warburg Institute and Institute of Classical Studies series on the afterlife of the Classics was devoted to the afterlife of Virgil.  This volume focuses on the reception of the Eclogues and the Aeneid in three main areas: Italian Renaissance poetry, scholarship and visual art; English responses to Virgil’s poetry; and emerging literatures in Eastern Europe in the seventeenth and eighteenth...

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