Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
May 10, 2010
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
Edited by Tim Cornell, B Rankov, and P Sabin
October 10, 1996
Edited by Peter Adamson, Han Baltussen, and M.W.F. Stone
January 1, 2005
This two volume Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies represents the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute on 27-29 June, 2002 in honour of Richard Sorabji.These volumes, which are intended to build on the massive achievement of Professor Sorabji’s Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series, focus on the commentary as a vehicle of philosophical and scientific thought.
Edited by Tesse D. Stek and Gert-Jan Burgers
March 2, 2015
This publication of the School of Advanced Study of the University of London is one of the outcomes of the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project and the Colonial Rural Networks project (NWO, Dr. T.D. Stek). The volume, edited by Tesse Stek and prof. Gert-Jan Burgers of the Free University Amsterdam, explores the role of religion in early Roman imperialism. The impact of Roman imperialism and expansionism on religious life in the newly incorporated areas has often been regarded as minimal, following the axiom of Roman ‘religious tolerance’. However, literary and epigraphic evidence points at the political and ideological importance of cult sites especially in conflict situations. Moreover, incisive changes in religious practices as...
Edited by Christopher A. Faraone
December 17, 2012
Greek magical texts sometimes contain peculiar triangular formations created by repeating the same word over and over again in the same column, but leaving off one letter at the beginning or end (or both). Interpretations shifted during the twentieth century: did the words inscribed in these shapes represent the names of diseases or evil demons which were forced to disappear as each letter of the name does? Or were they the work of Roman period scribes representing very different notions? This new study uses a masterly survey of the known examples of these texts to argue for a radical revision of recent views.
Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
February 14, 2009
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
Roy K. Gibson
February 1, 2007
Ovid’s Ars Amatoria has long had a reputation for ‘excess’, both moral and stylistic. Augustus’ banishment of the poet to Romania in 8 AD – for teaching ‘foul adultery’ in the Ars – is partly responsible for this reputation, along with Roman love elegy’s well-known predilection for immoderate attitudes and alienation from the values of conventional society. The Ars is undoubtedly a work of subversive tendencies, but its larger reputation has made it difficult for readers to appreciate one of the most striking, yet characteristic, features of the poem. In the pursuit of erotic ends, Ovid recommends to his pupils stratagems of moderation and self-restraint. Ovid’s (hedonistic) middle way is both a novelty for elegy, which is more accustomed...
Edited by Peter Mack and John North
May 4, 2015
Ovid was the most influential and widely imitated of all classical Latin poets. This volume publishes papers delivered at a conference on the Reception of Ovid in March 2013, jointly organised by the Institute of Classical Studies and the Warburg Institute, University of London.  It presents studies of the impact of Ovid’s work on Renaissance commentators, on neo-Latin poetry and epistolography, on Renaissance engravers, on poets like Dante, Mantuan, Pontano, Ariosto, Tasso, Spenser, Lodge, Weever, Milton and Cowley and on artists including Correggio and Rubens.  The main focus of the volume is inevitably the afterlife of the Metamorphoses but it also includes discussions of the impact of Heroides, Fasti, and Ibis, and publishes...
Edited by Peter Adamson, Rotraud Hansberger, and James Wiberding
July 7, 2014
Galen, the greatest figure in the history of pre-modern medicine, is also a significant figure in ancient philosophy. Not only is he a major source for many previous thinkers, such as the Presocratics and Stoics, but he also developed philosophical ideas of his own, in keeping with his famous dictum that ‘the best doctor is a philosopher’. This volume contributes to the growing field of research on Galen as a philosopher, with pieces devoted to his epistemology, his physics, and his theory of soul and human nature. His self-conception as a ‘philosophical’ author is also discussed, as is the question of whether his works were intended as contributions to the genre of philosophy.

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