Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Edited by Vassiliki Kampourelli
July 14, 2016
This book presents a critical application of semiotic models to Greek tragic space. It thus reappraises certain aspects of the tragic texts themselves by illuminating the semantics of space, that is, the ways in which space may contribute to the creation of meaning. After the formulation of a working model appropriate to the examination of space in Greek tragedy, an analysis of the proposed categories of tragic space follows. The architectural space of tragedy is then examined with particular reference to the ways in which it finds expression in the Theatre of Dionysus in Athens. Drawing widely on the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripedes, the focus turns to the interactions between the proposed categories of tragic space.
O Krzyszkowska
March 1, 2005
Seals and sealings provide an extremely rich source of evidence for the Aegean Bronze Age. They are truly monuments in miniature, offering insights into art and iconography, craft and technology, social status, administration and more besides. Aegean Seals is the first comprehensive overview of this fascinating subject, tracing the development of seals and sealing practices from the third millennium to the end of the Bronze Age, with particular emphasis on the great palace civilizations of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.Copiously illustrated, this study combines original research with critical analysis of specialist literature and presents many recent discoveries.
Edited by Douglas L. Cairns and Laurel Fulkerson
May 4, 2015
Emotion in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds is now an established field of research in classical studies, but so far scholars have made surprisingly few attempts to investigate the emotions of the two cultures in comparative terms.In this innovative and timely collection, nine leading scholars make a start on that project. Topics include: differences between the Greek and Roman emotional repertoires; the semantic fields and scripts covered by comparable Greek and Latin terms; the impact of bilingualism; the fate of emotion terms in translation; the way Roman authors deal with the emotional aspects of their Greek literary models; Greek and Roman views of the emotional character of their counterparts in the other culture.
Edited by Ulrike Roth
July 5, 2010
By the Sweat of Your Brow brings together the contributions of seven scholars from the UK and the European continent on different aspects of the socio-economic setting of Roman slavery.Individual chapters discuss the slave chapter of Diocletian’s Edict on Maximum Prices, the relationship between slave and free labour, the status of managerial slaves such as vilici and dispensatores, the use of legal sources for our understanding of the role of slavery in Roman society, the unchanging nature of slave prices from classical Athens and late antique Rome, the similarity in discourse and reality of the functions carried out by estate managers in ancient Rome and modern slave and serf societies, and, last, the structural relationship between...
Edited by Christopher Stray
June 4, 2007
Classical Books explores the interface between the history of books and the history of classical scholarship. Its contributors investigate the background to the production of texts, editions, histories and dictionaries many of which are now taken for granted by scholars. Abandoned authors blind alleys, false starts and fierce competition: Classical Books takes us behind the placid facades on library shelves to the processes of commissioning, writing, editing, design and printing which led to the publication of the books we use. Some of the books discussed were the work of major figures in nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholarship B Jowett, Murray, Jebb, Wilamowitz B but many lesser-known scholars also feature in these...
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Kosmas Dafas
October 18, 2018
This book presents a new study of Greek large-scale bronze statuary of the late Archaic and Classical periods. It examines the discovery, origin, style, date, artistic attribution, identification, and interpretation of the surviving bronzes, and focuses in particular on their technical features and casting techniques. It contains over 170 plates of photographs and drawings to illustrate its discussion. It also places the development of the casting techniques in connection with the stylistic evolution in Greek free-standing sculpture. During the Classical period, artists preferred bronze to marble when creating their contrapposto figures. Indisputably, bronze gave particular freedom to artists in creating three-dimensional...
Edited by Michael Crawford
December 1, 1995
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a Cooley
December 12, 2000
With contributions from Edward Bispham, Guy Bradley, Alison E. Cooley, Fay Glinister, Valerie Hope, Mark Pobjoy and Benet Salway.The Epigraphic Landscape presents a series of case-studies in which a new generation of scholars examines the significance of interpreting inscriptions in terms of their topographical context and physical appearance.Some chapters focus on a genre of inscription – honorific building and funerary – whilst others discuss a single text such as the Rapino Bronze and the album of Canusium. This approach reveals the contribution of inscribed monuments to the transformation of towns and countryside and the impact of Rome on the landscape of the rest of Italy.The integration of epigraphic literary archaeological and...
Edited by Christopher Carey and Michael Edwards
December 2, 2013
Some two and a half millennia ago, in the summer of 490 BC, a small army of 9,000 Athenians, supported only be a thousand troops from Plataea, faced and overcame the might of the Persian army of King Darius I on the plain of Marathon.While this was only the beginning of the Persian Wars, and the Greeks as a while would face a far greater threat to their freedom a decade later, the victory at Marathon had untold effects on the morale, confidence, and self-esteem of the Athenians, who would commemorate their finest hour in art and literature for centuries to come.This volume, which includes twenty-one papers originally presented at a colloquium hosted by the Faculty of Philology at the University of Peloponnese, Kalamata in 2010 to mark the...
Edited by Edith Hall and Phiroze Vasunia
June 7, 2010

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