Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Edited by William D. Furley
November 2, 2009
Epitrrepontes, or 'The Arbitration', which Menander produced around 300 BC, tackles the modern-sounding subject of a broken marriage. Charisios has left his young wife Pamphile over a suspected infidelity and moved in with his neighbour to drown his sorrows in wine and women, specifically, a spirited harp-girl called Habrotonon. The irate father-in-law will not tolerate this waste of a good dowry and demands of his daughter that she divorce. Bravely she holds out against her father's tirades and remains loyal to her husband.A complex and masterly dramatic sequence ensures that by the end 'all's well that ends well' - and Menander has struck a blow for equality of the sexes, for understanding over arrogance and pride.A large portion of the...
Edited by George Karamanolis and Anne Sheppard
October 5, 2006
As the study of later ancient philosophy has developed in recent years, it has offered new insights into both the continuing vigour of the Greco-Roman philosophical tradition and the interaction of that tradition with the new cultures of Christianity and of the Arab community. This volume addresses a key figure in this interaction. Porphyry (234?c.305 AD) was not only the greatest pupil of Plotinus and editor of his work but also a significant philosopher in his own right. Many aspects of Porphyry’s work have been re-appraised in recent years in the light of renewed interest in Neoplatonism as in later ancient philosophy in general. New editions and translations of Porphyry’s works have appeared enabling up-to-date discussion of issues...
Edited by Vivian Nutton
October 1, 2002
Edited by John Drinkwater and Benet Salway
July 1, 2007
Wolf Liebeschuetz is one of the most distinguished, creative and best-liked of contemporary Ancient Historians. In his fifty-year career of teaching and publication Wolf, German-born and British-educated, has informed generations of scholars – collaborating, instructing, disputing and commenting on research.In this volume, coinciding with his eightieth birthday, twenty historians and archaeologists who have known Wolf as friends, colleagues and pupils acknowledge and celebrate his influence by presenting papers on topics related to his four monographs: Antioch: City and Imperial Administration in the Later Roman Empire (1972); Continuity and Change in Roman Religion (1980); Barbarians and Bishops (1990); and ...
Edited by Stuart Dunn and Simon Mahony
December 9, 2013
This edited volume collects together peer-reviewed papers that initially emanated from presentations at Digital Classicist seminars and conference panels.This wide-ranging volume showcases exemplary applications of digital scholarship to the ancient world and critically examines the many challenges and opportunities afforded by such research. The chapters included here demonstrate innovative approaches that drive forward the research interests of both humanists and technologists while showing that rigorous scholarship is as central to digital research as it is to mainstream classical studies.As with the earlier Digital Classicist publications, our aim is not to give a broad overview of the field of digital classics; rather, we present here...
Edited by Claire Cullen Davison
August 10, 2009
The name of Pheidias and the renown of his sculptural masterpieces have resonated through the centuries. Pheidias’s works were endlessly copied by the Romans and his name was used to denote excellence well beyond Antiquity. His statue of Zeus at Olympia was regarded as one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, and the Athena Parthenos has linked his name forever with the Parthenon and its sculptures. And yet there is no firm proof that any surviving original is by his hand.What can we know about Pheidias and his work? This book attempts to answer this question by presenting both the archaeological and the written evidence for the output of this remarkable artist. It assembles and assesses all the available material in order to provide...
Edited by J.R.W Prag
September 3, 2007
Corruption in office, pervasive, subversive and perennial, requires the state to examine itself, its ethical values and its ways of working. The prosecution for corruption of Gaius Verres, governor of Sicily, has long been recognized for its exposure of ruthless depredation, of personal debauchery and abuse of office, and for the skilled presentation of the case by Cicero in his speech to the court as prosecutor. Longest of Cicero’s surviving orations and his only prosecution speech, the Verrines are an immensely rich source of evidence for Roman provincial government, for Roman law and above all for the rhetoric of prosecution. Deriving from a colloquium held at the Institute of Classical Studies in 2004, these papers confront directly...
Edited by Peter Adamson, Han Baltussen, and M.W.F. Stone
January 1, 2005
This two volume Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies represents the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute on 27-29 June, 2002 in honour of Richard Sorabji.These volumes, which are intended to build on the massive achievement of Professor Sorabji’s Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series, focus on the commentary as a vehicle of philosophical and scientific thought.Volume One deals with the Greek tradition, including one paper on Byzantine philosophy and one on the Latin author Calcidius, who is very close to the late Greek tradition in outlook. The volume begins with an overview of the tradition of commenting on Aristotle and of the study of this tradition in the modern era. It...
A.D. Morrison
October 1, 2007
Pindar’s fifteen victory odes for Sicilian victors include some of Pindar’s most impressive and widely admired poems, such as the first two Olympians and first three Pythians. The majority of the Sicilian odes date from between about 476 to 466 BC and were composed to celebrate the victories of the great tyrants of Sicily Hieron of Syracuse and Theron of Akragas or their families or courtiers at the crown games. The Sicilian tyrants made spectacular use of their wealth and power in competing in equestrian events at the games and in commissioning Pindar and Bacchylides to celebrate their victories in song. This book examines the Sicilian odes of Pindar as a group, investigating the ways in which they interact and exploit their overlapping...
Lynn S. Fotheringham
December 2, 2013
This innovative approach to Cicero's persuasive language analyses the style and structure of one of his important speeches in more detail than has ever been done before.It applies ideas from modern linguistics (sentential topic, lexical patterning, interactional discourse), and explores the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis, made easier by modern computing power, in the areas of syntax and vocabulary.The result is a reading of the Pro Milone as a unified text, whether aimed at persuading the jury to acquit Milo or at persuading a wider audience that Milo should have been acquitted. This reading not only contributes to our understanding of late republican discourse, but also suggests a new methodology for...

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