The School of Advanced Study unites nine internationally-renowned institutes to form the UK's national centre for the support and promotion of research in the humanities.

Our staff undertake research on a very wide range of topics in order to extend the boundaries of knowledge across disciplines and in collaboration with researchers from around the world is critical to the School’s function as an innovative space for advanced study and its commitment to the highest standards of scholarship.

Here, you can see some of the case studies of research undertaken by academics at the School and its institutes.

 

The Hart CollectionDr Cynthia Johnston: The Hart Collection reveals its treasures

Dr Cynthia Johnston discusses the benefits of the ‘academic partnership’ between the Institute of English Studies and the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery, which she says has resulted in the rediscovery of a major research resource in the UK.

HART COLLECTION

 

 

Professor Manos TsakirisProfessor Manos Tsakiris: The highways of culture, the pathways of the mind

Professor Manos Tsakiris, a world expert on psychology and cognitive neurosciences, introduces the interdisciplinary ‘Body and Image in Arts and Sciences (BIAS)’ project. Based at the Warburg Institute, it was launched in September 2016, thanks to a generous award from the NOMIS Foundation.

BIAS PROJECT

 

 

La natura, e coltura de’ fiori (Palermo: A. Felicella, 1767-68)Dr Elizabeth Savage: Reloading the matrix – the research revolution

The material turn in fields that rely on printed matter has led to interest in how those texts and images were - and are - produced. Those objects, including cut woodblocks, etched/engraved metal plates, and lithographic stones, could be fundamental to research, and while tens of thousand survive, relatively few are accessible. Dr Elizabeth Savage's project aims to rectify this.

MATRIX RELOADED

 

 

A bus burned by gang members in El SalvadorDr David Cantor: Rethinking forced migration

The level of violence in central America in recent years has been second only to Syria – but unlike Syria, they are not at war. Criminal violence is having a similar effect on the worldwide movement of refugees as the Syria conflict. A new book, co-edited Dr David James Cantor, director of the School of Advanced Study’s Refugee Law Initiative (RLI) with Nicolás Rodríguez Sema, a Colombian lawyer and RLI researcher, is raising the profile of this major humanitarian issue.  

RETHINKING FORCED MIGRATION