Literary criticism

Étienne Jodelle, edited by Richard Griffiths, and introduction by Richard Griffiths
January 1, 1994
Jodelle's startling originality as a lyric poet has only been recognised recently. His reputation in this century has mainly depended on his play Cléopâtre, the first regular tragedy based upon the Classical model to be performed in French. But while his lyric poetry was much appreciated by contemporaries, he was dismissed by intervening generations of critics, who, searching for norms, mistook his originality and vigour for amateurishness and incapability. This edition of the Amours, which were first printed in 1574, after Jodelle's death, is the first modern edition to produce the complete collection in the order originally printed. Richard Griffiths shows that, within the sonnets, this order reflects a structure of well-...
Léonie d’Aunet, edited by Wendy Mercer, and introduction by Wendy Mercer
January 1, 1994
Six years after achieving fame as the first woman ever to reach the unexplored Arctic islands of Spitzbergen, Léonie d'Aunet's distinction was transformed into notoriety when she was found in the act of adultery with Victor Hugo. In the 1840s, adultery was, for women at least, a criminal act, and Léonie d'Aunet was committed to prison and then to a period of confinement in a convent. Having lost children, friends, and financial support, she turned, on her release, to writing as a means of making a living. Perhaps reflecting her own experiences, the status of women in society is a theme central to all her work. Jane Osborn was first staged in Paris in 1855. Although it received favourable reviews in the press, it is clear that the critics...
Madame d’Aulnoy, edited by Shirley Jones Day, and introduction by Shirley Jones Day
January 1, 1994
First published in 1690, and one of the most popular novels in the eighteenth century, L'Histoire d'Hypolite, Comte de Duglas, was subsequently expunged from the literary canon. L'Histoire d'Hypolite confronts us with the novel at the dawn of the eighteenth century, and with the problems of a woman writer. Madame d'Aulnoy shows her powers as a literary artist in her image of England as a land of violence and passion, in the creation of the heroine Julie, a subtle mixture of subversiveness and passive acceptance of a morally compromised social order, and, above all, in the character of Hypolite, the archetype of the passionate rebel who was at one with the natural world. The historical...
Edited by Alan Bance and Ian Huish
January 1, 1989

The contents of this volume comprise the papers delivered at the second London Horváth symposium, held in 1988 under the auspices of the Institute of Germanic Studies and the Austrian Institute. At a time when Horváth studies were thriving, one of the objects of the symposium was to reflect their current stage of combining and diversifying. A number of the essays explore this topic, others reflect the turn towards his later work noticeable in the 1980s, but at the same time there is a perceptible turning back in the examination of new approaches to the 'Volksstück'. The topic of Horváth's relationship to his times continues to fascinate, and the volume examines the enigma of a man who, in Christopher...

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