Literary criticism

Isabel Hollis-Touré
March 27, 2015
Over the past four decades immigration to France from the Francophone countries of North Africa (Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) has changed in character. For much of the twentieth century, migrants who crossed the Mediterranean to France were men seeking work, who frequently undertook manual labour, working long hours in difficult conditions. Recent decades have seen an increase in family reunification - the arrival of women and children from North Africa, either accompanying their husbands or joining them in France. Contemporary creative representations of migration are shaped by this shift in gender and generation from a solitary, mostly male experience to one that included women and children. Just as the shift made new demands of the '...
Frauke Matthes
February 1, 2012
Writing and Muslim Identity is a comparative study of Islam in contemporary German- and English-language literature. At a time when the non-Islamic world seems to be defining itself increasingly in contrast to the Islamic world, this literary exploration of Islam-related issues sheds new and valuable light on the cultural interaction between the Muslim world and 'the West'. Writing and Muslim Identity engages with literary representations of different versions of Islam and asks how travel and migration, the transcultural experiences of migrant and post-migrant Muslims, may have shaped the Islams encountered in today's Germany and Britain. With its comparative approach to 'cultural translations' as creative and challenging...
Edited by Christopher Ligota and Letizia Panizza
March 1, 2007
The essays in this volume bring together, in a revised and updated form, papers presented at a colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in December 1995. As the title suggests, Lucian is considered both in his contemporary environment and in his Nachleben, and the overall purpose is to show the freshness and resilience of the presence in European culture of an author whose well-aimed satirical wit has, from his time to ours, led to defensive attempts at repression and expulsion from the cultural canon. As Kurt Tucholsky put it, nothing was sacred to Lucian, which makes him a 'friend, cousin, brother, comrade at arms'.
Rüdiger Görner
January 1, 1999
Inaugural Lecture delivered on 10 June 1999 at the University of London Senate House.
Edited by Lothar Huber and Robert C. Conard
January 1, 1997

Heinrich Böll on Page and Screen makes available the papers given at the symposium held at the Institute of Germanic Studies and the Goethe Institute, London, in December 1995, to commemorate the tenth anniversary of Böll's death. The articles present new critical perspectives on a writer who is now generally accepted as one of the most important literary figures in Germany during the second half of the twentieth century, and some essays pay particular attention to the hitherto neglected area of Böll's contribution to radio and film, examining the work of a number of renowned directors who have translated his scenarios and characters into the language of the popular mass media.

Joseph Joubert and edited by David Kinloch and Philippe Mangeot
March 1, 1996

Depuis quelque temps la ‘pensée’ de Joubert est connue et étudiée, mais ce qu’on ignore est l’importance qu’il donne à l’acte même d’écrire et son scepticisme à l’égard du ‘livre’. Joubert ne destine pas ses écrits à la publication. Il s’attache dans son manuscript à designer la singularité absolue, ‘infracasable’, de chaque moment et de chaque fragment d’écriture. Mais ce qu’aucune edition n’a pu montrer jusqu’à present, c’est que Joubert était non moins fascine et troublé par l’acte même de l’écriture et la nature epistémologique du livre que par la nécessité d’élaborer une esthétique cohérente. Les éditeurs actuels ont préféré typographier ces carnets, tout en reproduisant, autant que possible, l’inscription du texte sur...

Edited by Elaine Williamson
January 1, 1996

Stendhal et la Hollande présente au lecteur quelque 200 documents inédits rédigés par Stendhal. Accompagnés de notes et commentaires autographes ils illustrent une étape essentielle de la genèse de son style. Elaine Williamson, qui a découvert ces documents, montre dans son introduction comment les techniques de composition utilisées par Stendhal dans son travail administrative préfigurent son œuvre de romancier. Ces documents datent du temps où Stendhal, auditeur au Conseil d’Etat, était chargé de l’administration des domaines et des bâtiments de la Couronne en Hollande, territoire réuni à la France en 1810 par Napoléon. Ils situent son œuvre dans l’univers du Premier Empire et s’appuient sur des notes identifiant ses sources...

Edited by L. M. Newman
January 1, 1995

This long-awaited edition brings together for the first time 366 letters, cards and telegrams exchanged between Craig and his patron the cosmopolitan Count Kessler. An important primary source, illuminated by Dr Newman's commentary, it focuses on three areas of particular importance:- 1. Craig's artistic ideas and the spread of his influence through exhibitions and books; proposals are developed for work with Otto Brahm, Eleonora Duse, Max Reinhardt, Henry van de Velde, Eduard Verkade, Leopold Jessner, Dyaghilev, Beerbohm Tree, C. B. Cochran, and others. 2. Kessler's Cranach Press Hamlet with wood-engraved illustrations by Craig; this is a landmark in the history of twentieth-century book design and printing whose...

Léonie d’Aunet, edited by Wendy Mercer, and introduction by Wendy Mercer
January 1, 1994
Six years after achieving fame as the first woman ever to reach the unexplored Arctic islands of Spitzbergen, Léonie d'Aunet's distinction was transformed into notoriety when she was found in the act of adultery with Victor Hugo. In the 1840s, adultery was, for women at least, a criminal act, and Léonie d'Aunet was committed to prison and then to a period of confinement in a convent. Having lost children, friends, and financial support, she turned, on her release, to writing as a means of making a living. Perhaps reflecting her own experiences, the status of women in society is a theme central to all her work. Jane Osborn was first staged in Paris in 1855. Although it received favourable reviews in the press, it is clear that the critics...

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