Latin American Studies

Edited by David James Cantor and Nicolás Rodríguez Serna
November 1, 2016
In Latin America, recent years have seen an unprecedented rise in the number of people forced to flee from their homes due to the activities of organised criminal groups. What are the reasons behind this emerging crisis of forced displacement in the Americas? Who are these criminal groups and how do they operate in Central America, Mexico and Colombia? Who are the victims and how can their needs be met in these violent and insecure contexts? Can law and policy offer a humanitarian response to this crisis? As the first book to deal with this rapidly evolving phenomenon, this innovative collection offers a range of fresh perspectives from leading experts working across Latin America.
Edited by David James Cantor, Luisa Feline Freier, and Jean-Pierre Gauci
May 30, 2015
Over the past decade, a paradigm shift in migration and asylum law and policymaking appears to have taken place in Latin America. Does this apparent ""liberal tide"" of new laws and policies suggest a new approach to the hot topics of migration and refugees in Latin America distinct from the regressive and restrictive attitudes on display in other parts of the world? The question is urgent not only for our understanding of contemporary Latin America but also as a means of reorienting the debate in the migration studies field toward the important developments currently taking place in the region and in other parts of the global south. This book brings together eight varied and vibrant new analyses by scholars from Latin America and beyond...
Edited by Salvador Marti i Puig, Reynaldo Yunuen Ortega Ortiz, M. Fernanda Somuano Ventura, and Claire Wright
June 30, 2014
Edited by Eduardo Posada-Carbo and Anthony McFarlane
January 1, 1999
The essays in this volume re-examine, from a number of different angles the process of Independence in Spanish America. The focus is to a large extent on the consequences of the wars of Independence for the newly established republics. However the first section deals with a critical review of the historiography the ‘revolutionary’ nature of Independence and the comparative elements of Independence in the Americas. The remainder of the book examines the development of the wars and the impact that Independence had on political instability culture citizenship and the formation of new nations. In addition to general chapters there are individual chapters devoted to New Granada Venezuela Mexico Chile and Argentina.

Pages