History

Edited by Donnacha Sean Lucey and Virginia Crossman
January 23, 2015
This volume explores developments in health and social care in Ireland and Britain during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The central objectives are to highlight the role of voluntarism in healthcare, to examine healthcare in local and regional contexts, and to provide comparative perspectives. The collection is based on two interconnected and overlapping research themes: voluntarism and healthcare, and regionalism/localism and healthcare. It includes two synoptic overviews by leading authorities in the field, and ten case studies focusing on particular aspects of voluntary and/or regional healthcare in Ireland and Britain.
Edited by Clodagh Harrington
October 1, 2014
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William H. Campbell
September 1, 2014
Six new dioceses were created out of the larger dioceses, having as their cathedrals former abbey churches. These fourteen were known as the New Foundation, as compared with the thirteen medieval secular cathedrals of the Old Foundation. Further substantial reorganisation took place in the eighteen-thirties, and additional dioceses were created to meet the needs of the period.
Edited by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and volume editor Tim Cornell and Oswyn Murray
July 30, 2014

In 2008-2009 a group of Arnaldo Momigliano’s disciples met at the Warburg Institute to celebrate the centenary of his birth and to recall the great series of seminars held by him from 1967 to 1983: the aim was to explore the significance of his legacy some twenty years after his death, in all the various areas where he made a major contribution. His seminars had opened the eyes of the participants to the meaning of historical research in their different fields, from ancient Jewish, Greek and Roman history and late antiquity to the study of the historiography especially of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The contributors to this volume have all asked how far his influence still determines the future of our various special areas...

Compiled by Emma Bohan, Zoe Holman, and Maureen McTaggart
June 30, 2014
Edited by Charles Burnett and Pedro Mantas-España
June 2, 2014

The first volume of the Arabica Veritas series contains sixteen papers divided between two sections, dealing respectively with beliefs and practices characterising the Late Antique period before the emergence of the new order of Islam in the Near East, and with the cultural issues within Islam and in Christian Europe, especially after the impact of Arabic writings. Most of the papers edited here were first presented at the International Seminar on Cultural Transfer of Knowledge in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, held in November 2012 at the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Córdoba, as an opening academic activity of the Córdoba Near Eastern Research Unit (CNERU).

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Edited by Emma Bohan, Zoe Holman, Maureen McTaggart, and Jane Winters
May 16, 2014

Lists nearly 600 theses on historical topics completed and approved in the previous calendar year in UK and Irish Universities. Includes an index of authors and subjects.

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Compiled by Emma Bohan, Valerie Hall, Valerie Hall, Maureen McTaggart, and Jane Winters
February 7, 2014
Anna Ayse Akasoy and edited by Charles Burnett and Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim
November 1, 2013

Rashid al-Din (1274-1318), physician and powerful minister at the court of the Ilkhans, was a key figure in the cosmopolitan milieu in Iran under Mongol rule. He set up an area in the vicinity of the court where philosophers, doctors, astronomers, and historians from different parts of Eurasia lived together, exchanged ideas and produced books. He was himself involved in collecting, collating and editing these materials, and the substantial oeuvre that resulted is a gold-mine for anyone studying the transmission of knowledge across cultures. By bringing together contributions from the fields of the history of religion, medicine, science and art, this book examines the cultural dynamics of Rashid al-Din’s circle. It addresses questions...

Edited by Dirk Miert
November 1, 2013

The case studies in this volume juxtapose instances of knowledge exchange across a variety of fields usually studied in isolation: anthropology, medicine, botany, epigraphy, astronomy, geography, philosophy and chronology. In their letters, scientists and scholars tried to come to grips with the often unclear epistemological status of an ‘observation’, a term which covered a wide semantic field, ranging from acts of perceiving to generalized remarks on knowledge. Observations were associated with descriptions, transcriptions, copies, drawings, casts and coordinates, and they frequently took into account the natural, material, linguistic, historical, religious and social contexts. Early modern scholars were well aware of the...

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