History

Volume editor Judith Herrin and Jinty Nelson
June 24, 2016
In the long-debated transition from late antiquity to the early middle ages, the city of Ravenna presents a story rich and strange. From the fourth century onwards it suffered decline in economic terms. Yet its geographical position, its status as an imperial capital, and above all its role as a connecting point between East and West, ensured that it remained an intermittent attraction for early medieval kings and emperors throughout the period from the late fifth to the eleventh century. Ravenna’s story is all the more interesting because it was complicated and unpredictable: discontinuous and continuous, sometimes obscure, sometimes including bursts of energetic activity. Throughout the early medieval centuries its flame sometimes flared...
Edited by Matthew Davies
June 10, 2016
This volume contains selected essays in celebration of the scholarship of the medieval historian Professor James L. Bolton. The essays address a number of different questions in medieval economic and social history, as the volume looks at the activities of merchants, their trade, legal interactions and identities, and on the importance of money and credit in the rural and urban economies. Other essays look more widely at patterns of immigration to London, trade and royal policy, and the role that merchants played in the Hundred Years War.
Edited by Donnacha Sean Lucey and Virginia Crossman
January 23, 2015
This volume explores developments in health and social care in Ireland and Britain during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The central objectives are to highlight the role of voluntarism in healthcare, to examine healthcare in local and regional contexts, and to provide comparative perspectives. The collection is based on two interconnected and overlapping research themes: voluntarism and healthcare, and regionalism/localism and healthcare. It includes two synoptic overviews by leading authorities in the field, and ten case studies focusing on particular aspects of voluntary and/or regional healthcare in Ireland and Britain.
Edited by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and volume editor Tim Cornell and Oswyn Murray
July 30, 2014

In 2008-2009 a group of Arnaldo Momigliano’s disciples met at the Warburg Institute to celebrate the centenary of his birth and to recall the great series of seminars held by him from 1967 to 1983: the aim was to explore the significance of his legacy some twenty years after his death, in all the various areas where he made a major contribution. His seminars had opened the eyes of the participants to the meaning of historical research in their different fields, from ancient Jewish, Greek and Roman history and late antiquity to the study of the historiography especially of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The contributors to this volume have all asked how far his influence still determines the future of our various special areas...

Volume editor Debra Kelly and Martyn Cornick
May 1, 2013
This book examines, for the first time, the history of the social, cultural, political and economic presence of the French in London, and explores the multiple ways in which this presence has contributed to the life of the city. The capital has often provided a place of refuge, from the Huguenots in the 17th century, through the period of the French Revolution, to various exile communities during the 19th century, and on to the Free French in the Second World War.It also considers the generation of French citizens who settled in post-war London, and goes on to provide insights into the contemporary French presence by assessing the motives and lives of French people seeking new opportunities in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. It...
Edited by Matthew Davies and James A. Galloway
August 28, 2012
This volume contains selected papers from a major conference held in October 2008 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Centre for Metropolitan History at the IHR, and the contribution of Professor Derek Keene to the Centre, the IHR and the wider world of scholarship.
Edited by Laura Beers and Geraint Thomas
January 5, 2012
After the First World War, Britain faced a number of challenges as it sought to adapt to domestic conditions of mass democracy while maintaining its position in the empire in the face of national independence movements. As politicians at home and abroad sought to legitimize their position, new efforts were made to conceptualize nationality and citizenship, with attempts to engage the public using mass media and greater emphasis on governing in the public interest. Brave New World reappraises the domestic and imperial history of Britain in the inter-war period, investigating how 'nation building' was given renewed impetus by the upheavals of the First World War. The essays in this collection address how new technologies and approaches to...
James Galloway
October 15, 2010
The lands bordering the tidal river Thames and the Thames Estuary have historically been highly vulnerable to marine flooding. The most severe of these floods derive from North Sea storm surges, when wind and tide combine to drive huge quantities of water against the coast, as happened to devastating effect in 1953. This project seeks to understand the occurrence of storm flooding in the past, and to explore the ways in which people have responded to the threat.

The project draws upon rich surviving documentary sources to study the impact of storm flooding upon the reclaimed marshlands bordering the tidal Thames and its estuary during the period c.1250-1550. Year-by-year accounts of the management of riverside...
Edward Higgs
March 31, 2005
Ian Anders Gadd and Patrick Wallis
January 1, 2002
This book is made up of a collection of papers from the 'Revisiting the livery companies of early modern London' conference held in April 2000 by the CMH, exploring the history of London livery companies from a variety of perspectives. Employing historical and interdisciplinary approaches, it examines print culture and early histories, civic myths, charity, the family, artisans, mercantile elites, and the control and regulation of guild and economy. Contributions by Ian W. Archer, Matthew Davies, John Forbes, Ian Anders Gadd, Perry Gauci, Ronald F. Homer, Mark Jenner, Derek Keene, Giorgio Riello, James Robertson, Patrick Wallis, Joseph P. Ward.