Classics

Edited by Christopher A. Faraone
December 17, 2012
Greek magical texts sometimes contain peculiar triangular formations created by repeating the same word over and over again in the same column, but leaving off one letter at the beginning or end (or both). Interpretations shifted during the twentieth century: did the words inscribed in these shapes represent the names of diseases or evil demons which were forced to disappear as each letter of the name does? Or were they the work of Roman period scribes representing very different notions? This new study uses a masterly survey of the known examples of these texts to argue for a radical revision of recent views.
Edited by Peter Agócs, Christopher Carey, and Richard Rawles
June 1, 2012
A collection of distinguished scholars examine different moments in the victory ode’s reception history, from the lifetime of Pindar and Bacchylides themselves through the Roman empire and the Middle Ages to the modern world, in a variety of texts and in differing cultural contexts.
Anastasia Bakogianni
January 16, 2012

Electra is a unique, complex, and fascinating Greek tragic heroine, who became a source of inspiration for countless playwrights, artists, musicians and filmmakers. The daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra she famously supported her brother’s quest to avenge their father’s murder even at the cost of matricide. Her passion for justice and her desire for vengeance have echoed down the centuries to the modern era.

Enshrined as the mourner of Greek tragedy par excellence Electra has enjoyed a long and rich reception history.

Electra, ancient and modern, examines the treatment of Electra by all three ancient tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, and their dialogue with the mythical tradition that preceded...

Edited by M.H. Crawford
January 2, 2012

Imagines Italicae, edited by M. H. Crawford and colleagues, is the outcome of a research project based in the combined library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies and of the Institute, beginning in 2002 and initially supported by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.

 

The empire created by Rome underlies many of the structures of modern Europe, and that empire in turn was in its early stages the joint creation of Rome and the other peoples of Italy. Almost the only records left by those peoples themselves consist of the texts they inscribed and the coinages they produced. Imagines Italicae provides for the first time a complete corpus of those texts which are in one or other of the Italic...

David W. J. Gill
April 4, 2011

‘...what we wanted was to connect ourselves directly with the heart of Hellenic culture so that its very lifeblood might flow through our veins, and this we should gain by the establishment of the school at Athens’

(J.B. Lightfoot, Bishop of Durham)

The British School at Athens opened in 1886 ‘to promote all researches and studies’ which could ‘advance the knowledge of Hellenic history, literature, and art from the earliest age to the present day’. Over the next 30 years the School initiated a major programme of excavations, initially on Cyprus, then at Megalopolis, on Melos, and at Sparta. School students took part in the work of the Cretan Exploration Fund and in the major regional surveys of the Asia Minor Exploration...

Edited by Verity Harte, M.M McCabe, and Robert W. Sharples
January 10, 2011

Plato is perhaps the most readable of all philosophers. Recent scholarship on Plato has focused attention on the dramatic and literary form through which Plato presents his philosophy, an integral part of that philosophy.

The papers in this volume for the first time consider Aristotle and the Stoics as readers of Plato. That these successors were influenced by the thought of Plato is a commonplace: the ‘whole of western philosophy is a series of footnotes to Plato’.

Arising from Institute of Classical Studies Research Seminars in 2004-5 and 2005-6, the papers in this volume rather consider whether and how the philosophical concerns of these later thinkers were served were served by close reading of Plato,...

Edited by William D. Furley
November 2, 2009

Epitrrepontes, or 'The Arbitration', which Menander produced around 300 BC, tackles the modern-sounding subject of a broken marriage. Charisios has left his young wife Pamphile over a suspected infidelity and moved in with his neighbour to drown his sorrows in wine and women, specifically, a spirited harp-girl called Habrotonon. The irate father-in-law will not tolerate this waste of a good dowry and demands of his daughter that she divorce. Bravely she holds out against her father's tirades and remains loyal to her husband.

A complex and masterly dramatic sequence ensures that by the end 'all's well that ends well' - and Menander has struck a blow for equality of the sexes, for understanding over arrogance and pride.

A...

Edited by Claire Cullen Davison
August 10, 2009

The name of Pheidias and the renown of his sculptural masterpieces have resonated through the centuries. Pheidias’s works were endlessly copied by the Romans and his name was used to denote excellence well beyond Antiquity. His statue of Zeus at Olympia was regarded as one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, and the Athena Parthenos has linked his name forever with the Parthenon and its sculptures. And yet there is no firm proof that any surviving original is by his hand.

What can we know about Pheidias and his work? This book attempts to answer this question by presenting both the archaeological and the written evidence for the output of this remarkable artist. It assembles and assesses all the available material in order...

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Edited by Susan Walker and Dame Averil Cameron
January 1, 1989

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