Classics

Edited by Christos Kremmydas, Jonathan Powell, and Lene Rubinstein
November 4, 2013

This volume brings together six papers relating to oratory and orators in public fora of Classical Greece and Rome.

Edwards and Bers explore aspects of oratorical delivery in the Athenian courts and Assembly, including the demands placed on orators by the physical settings. Tempest examines the conceptions of oratorical competence and incompetence, particularly in respect of performance, as they are implied in Cicero’s criticisms of the rival prosecutor in the trial of Verres.

Papers by Karambelas and Powell look at evidence for the importance of advocacy in the Second Sophistic and the late Roman Empire respectively.

In an introduction, the editors discuss recurrent themes connected with the orator’s...

Edited by Andrew Gardner, Edward Herring, and Kathryn Lomas
November 4, 2013

Questions of ethnic and cultural identities are central to the contemporary understanding of the Roman world.

The expansion of Rome across Italy, the Mediterranean, and beyond entailed encounters with a wide range of peoples. Many of these had well-established pre-conquest ethnic identities which can be compared with Roman perceptions of them. In other cases, the ethnicity of peoples conquered by Rome has been perceived almost entirely through the lenses of Roman ethnographic writing and administrative structures.

The formation of such identities, and the shaping of these identities by Rome, was a vital part of the process of Roman imperialism. Comparisons across the empire reveal some similarities in the processes of...

Edited by Dyfri Williams
August 5, 2013

The sculptural decoration of the Parthenon, conceived at the height of Athens’ power, was deeply rooted in the culture and aspirations of the city-state. The group of huge figures carved completely in the round and set in the triangular gable at the east end, the front of the temple, were perhaps among the most important. 

This new study by Dyfri Williams uses all the visible clues provided by the sculptures and the floor blocks on which they were once mounted to reconstruct the figures and the way they interacted. Securer identifications for the figures are thus reached and a better understanding of the allusive way the pediment’s subject, the birth of Athena, was treated. To aid the process, a series of sketch-drawings...

Edited by Anne Sheppard
July 1, 2013
 Plato's Republic covers a very wide range of philosophical topics, many of them also addressed in other Platonic dialogues. The papers in this volume, arising from the Institute of Classical Studies research seminar in ancient philosophy in 2007-2008, illustrate the range and diversity of responses to the Republic in antiquity. These responses show, for example, how in criticizing the doctrine of the tripartite soul Aristotle is as much concerned with the Timaeus as with the Republic, how Cicero regarded the Republic and the Laws as complementing one another, and how Proclus treated the discussion of music in the Republic alongside the account of cosmic music in the Timaeus. Other papers examine the interpretations of the myth of Er...
Edited by Ed Sanders
July 1, 2013

Arising out of a conference on ‘Erôs in Ancient Greece’, the articles in this volume share a historicizing approach to the conventions and expectations of erôs in the context of the polis, in the Archaic and Classical periods of ancient Greece.

The articles focus on (post-Homeric) Archaic and Classical poetic genres – namely lyric poetry, tragedy, and comedy – and some philosophical texts by Plato, Xenophon, and Aristotle.

They pursue a variety of issues, including: the connection between homosexual erôs and politics; sexual practices that fell outside societal norms (aristocratic homosexuality, chastity); the roles of sôphrosynê (self-control) and akrasia...

Edited by Richard Hobbs
April 8, 2013

Currency & exchange in ancient Pompeii examines how coinage became a key component of the economic life of the town from the third century BC to the dramatic destruction of Pompeii by the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79.

The study discusses one of the largest assemblages of coins found so far from below the layer of destruction of AD 79. Over 1,500 coins were found during a ten-year campaign of excavation of Regio VI, Insula 1 by the Anglo-American Project in Pompeii (AAPP).

Currency & exchange in ancient Pompeii  looks at the range of coins found, from mints across the Mediterranean, reflecting Pompeii’s wide-ranging trade connections, in particular, Ebusus, Massalia, and Rome, and...

Edited by Christopher A. Faraone
December 17, 2012
Greek magical texts sometimes contain peculiar triangular formations created by repeating the same word over and over again in the same column, but leaving off one letter at the beginning or end (or both). Interpretations shifted during the twentieth century: did the words inscribed in these shapes represent the names of diseases or evil demons which were forced to disappear as each letter of the name does? Or were they the work of Roman period scribes representing very different notions? This new study uses a masterly survey of the known examples of these texts to argue for a radical revision of recent views.
Edited by Peter Agócs, Christopher Carey, and Richard Rawles
June 1, 2012
A collection of distinguished scholars examine different moments in the victory ode’s reception history, from the lifetime of Pindar and Bacchylides themselves through the Roman empire and the Middle Ages to the modern world, in a variety of texts and in differing cultural contexts.
Anastasia Bakogianni
January 16, 2012

Electra is a unique, complex, and fascinating Greek tragic heroine, who became a source of inspiration for countless playwrights, artists, musicians and filmmakers. The daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra she famously supported her brother’s quest to avenge their father’s murder even at the cost of matricide. Her passion for justice and her desire for vengeance have echoed down the centuries to the modern era.

Enshrined as the mourner of Greek tragedy par excellence Electra has enjoyed a long and rich reception history.

Electra, ancient and modern, examines the treatment of Electra by all three ancient tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, and their dialogue with the mythical tradition that preceded...

Edited by M.H. Crawford
January 2, 2012

Imagines Italicae, edited by M. H. Crawford and colleagues, is the outcome of a research project based in the combined library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies and of the Institute, beginning in 2002 and initially supported by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.

 

The empire created by Rome underlies many of the structures of modern Europe, and that empire in turn was in its early stages the joint creation of Rome and the other peoples of Italy. Almost the only records left by those peoples themselves consist of the texts they inscribed and the coinages they produced. Imagines Italicae provides for the first time a complete corpus of those texts which are in one or other of the Italic...

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