British history

Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal and Caroline M. Barron
September 2, 2019
T. F.Tout (1855–1929) was the foremost English medieval historian of the early twentieth century. He worked to incorporate archival research into the study of history in the UK; he opened the door on to administrative history; he welcomed women into academia and he made the University of Manchester a key contributor to the world of international scholarship.The vitality and relevance of Tout’s life and work came, perhaps, as a surprise to those who attended the conference at the Institute of Historical Research in 2017. In these papers the authors reflect, in most cases for the first time since Tout’s death, on his early career at Lampeter, his pioneering work in Manchester and his wide ranging service to the study of history outside...
Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal and Caroline M. Barron
September 2, 2019
T. F.Tout (1855–1929) was the foremost English medieval historian of the early twentieth century. He worked to incorporate archival research into the study of history in the UK; he opened the door on to administrative history; he welcomed women into academia and he made the University of Manchester a key contributor to the world of international scholarship.The vitality and relevance of Tout’s life and work came, perhaps, as a surprise to those who attended the conference at the Institute of Historical Research in 2017. In these papers the authors reflect, in most cases for the first time since Tout’s death, on his early career at Lampeter, his pioneering work in Manchester and his wide ranging service to the study of history outside...
John Hare
March 1, 2018
Basingstoke is frequently seen as a very modern town, the product of the last decades of the 20th century. In reality it has a long, rich and prosperous history. From its beginnings c.1000 it became a significant market centre for the area around, and a place on the route to London from the west. By 1500 it was among the top 60 towns in England by wealth and taxpayers, and the centre of a major industrial area, whose manufactured cloths formed part of international patterns of trade. Moreover, it is well documented particularly for the 15th and 16th century, when it was at its peak, and should provide a useful addition to the limited number of studies of small medieval towns. Much of the old town has been swept away by the...
John Hare
December 22, 2017
Basingstoke is frequently seen as a very modern town, the product of the last decades of the 20th century. In reality it has a long, rich and prosperous history. From its beginnings c.1000 it became a significant market centre for the area around, and a place on the route to London from the west. By 1500 it was among the top 60 towns in England by wealth and taxpayers, and the centre of a major industrial area, whose manufactured cloths formed part of international patterns of trade. Moreover, it is well documented particularly for the 15th and 16th century, when it was at its peak, and should provide a useful addition to the limited number of studies of small medieval towns. Much of the old town has been swept away by the...
Pamela J. Fisher and J.M. Lee
April 7, 2017
The parish of Castle Donington  in north-west Leicestershire lies on the south bank of the river Trent, 20 miles north-west of Leicester and 8 miles south-east of Derby. A nucleated village developed on the present site more than 1,000 years ago. A castle was built in the 1150s, and several features of a town soon developed, including a market, fair and hospital. Secondary settlements grew up alongside the Trent, by the King’s Mills and at Cavendish Bridge, the site of an important medieval ferry. Donington Park, which originated in the early 13th century as a hunting park, became a separate estate of the earls of Huntingdon in the late 16th century. Later history has been shaped by strong religious nonconformity and the growth and...
Pamela J. Fisher and J.M. Lee
December 9, 2016
The parish of Castle Donington  in north-west Leicestershire lies on the south bank of the river Trent, 20 miles north-west of Leicester and 8 miles south-east of Derby. A nucleated village developed on the present site more than 1,000 years ago. A castle was built in the 1150s, and several features of a town soon developed, including a market, fair and hospital. Secondary settlements grew up alongside the Trent, by the King’s Mills and at Cavendish Bridge, the site of an important medieval ferry. Donington Park, which originated in the early 13th century as a hunting park, became a separate estate of the earls of Huntingdon in the late 16th century. Later history has been shaped by strong religious nonconformity and the growth and...
David Cannadine
February 19, 2016
"Not only was Churchill the most illustrious and the most distinguished Chancellor that the University of Bristol has ever had, but he was also in his prime, from the 1940s onwards, probably the most famous and the most distinguished chancellor of any university anywhere in the world." David Cannadine
John Beckett, Elizabeth Williamson, and Matthew Bristow
June 1, 2012
Her Majesty the Queen has graciously permitted the Victoria County History to rededicate its series of county volumes, in celebration of her Diamond Jubilee. The History keeps the name it was given in honour of Queen Victoria when it was founded in 1899 as one of great national projects of that time. It has remained one of the foundations of knowledge about English localities, publishing a remarkable series of encyclopaedic volumes, county-by-county, parish-by-parish. This book is about the Victoria County History of today: how it developed in its early commercial years through the commitment of its General Editors and a team of experts, before becoming a great public project based at the University of London, and now a...
Edited by Charles Burnett and Nicholas Mann
December 1, 2005
This volume attempts to bring together, to our knowledge for the first time, aspects of the whole of the long history of Latin as written in Great Britain. The papers explore the use of Latin in different contexts at different periods, from the early Middle Ages until the twentieth century. They range over the subjects of philology, philosophy, scholarship, humanism and teaching methods, with separate chapters for Scotland and Wales. This book arose from a conference sponsored by the Fondazione Cassamarca, which also contributed generously to its publication.ContentsMichael Lapidge: How ‘English’ is Pre-Conquest Latin.Peter Dronke Arbor eterna: A Ninth-Century Welsh Latin Sequence.Maria Amalia D’Aronco: How ‘English’ is Anglo-Saxon...

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