Open access titles

Ewan Gibbs
February 15, 2021

The flooding and subsequent closure of Scotland’s last deep coal mine in 2002 brought a centuries long saga to an end. Villages and towns across the densely populated Central Belt owe their existence to coal mining’s expansion during the nineteenth century and its maturation in the twentieth. Colliery closures and job losses were not just experienced in economic terms: they had profound implications for what it meant to be a worker, a Scot and a resident of an industrial settlement. Coal Country presents the first book-length account of deindustrialization in the Scottish coalfields. It draws on archival research using records from UK government, the nationalized coal industry and trade unions, as well as the...

Sarah Goldsmith
November 30, 2020

The Grand Tour was a journey to continental Europe undertaken by British nobility and wealthy landed gentry during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As a rite of passage, the Tour also played an important role in the formation of contemporary notions of elite masculinity.

Examining letters, diaries and other records left by Grand Tourists, tutors and their families, this book demonstrates how the Tour was used to educate elite young men in a wide variety of skills, virtues and masculine behaviours that extended well beyond polite society. Sarah Goldsmith argues that dangerous experiences, in particular, were far more central to the Tour as a means of constructing Britain’s next generation of leaders than has...

Edited by Antonia Fitzpatrick and John Sabapathy
July 31, 2020

This volume explores the relationship between individuals and institutions in scholastic thought and practice across the twelfth and fifteenth centuries, setting an agenda for future debates. Written by leading European experts from numerous fields, this theoretically sophisticated collection analyses a wide range of intellectual practices and disciplines. Avoiding narrow approaches to scholasticism, the book addresses ethics, history, heresy, law, inquisition, metaphysics, pastoral care, poetry, religious orders, saints’ cults and theology. A substantial introduction establishes an accessible historiographical context for the volume’s agenda, and a final afterword examines implications for future research.

The history of...

Edited by David Bates, Jennifer Wallis, and Jane Winters
July 17, 2020

The Creighton Century, 1907–2007 offers a selection of ten lectures from the first 100 years of the University of London’s prestigious Creighton Lecture series. Each of the chosen lectures, delivered between 1913 and 2004, is introduced and set in context by a historian of the modern-day University. The collection also includes, and is introduced by, Robert Evans’s 2007 centenary lecture, ‘The Creighton century: British historians and Europe, 1907–2007’.

This volume provides a fascinating insight into the development of the discipline of history over the twentieth and early twenty-first century, revealing some significant changes in approach and emphasis as well as some surprising continuities. The Creighton...

Jerome J. McGann
July 10, 2020

In October 1869, Pre-Raphaelite painter and poet, Gabriel Dante Rossetti exhumed the grave of his former muse and wife, Elizabeth Siddal, to retrieve some earlier poetry he had buried with her. The collection was published as the Poems of D. G. Rossetti in 1870 to great controversy- for their eroticism and hedonism- and none received greater attention than the ‘House of Life’ sonnets, a ballad intimately describing a romantic relationship.

In this short essay, Professor Jerome J. McGann unpacks the origins and inspirations for the ‘House of Life’ sonnets, including the influence of Italian poet, Dante Alighieri; their shared traits of allegory and theatricality, Rossetti’s abstract concepts of life and love,...

Edited by Miri Rubin
July 3, 2020
European Religious Cultures is a set of stimulating essays first written as offerings for Christopher Brooke on his eightieth birthday. They are now gathered for the enjoyment of all those interested in the history of religious cultures. They address a variety of practices in religious life -- among them pilgrimage and the urban cult of saints, the monastic performance of liturgy, the choice to enter the priesthood -- and situate them within the life-cycles and social relations of medieval Europeans. The authors have been inspired by Christopher Brooke's own interests over a long and fruitful career.

First published in 2008, European Religious Cultures is now reissued as an Open Access edition with a...
David Crystal OBE
June 19, 2020

Professor David Crystal discusses Computer-Mediated Speech (CMC), or Netspeak. In this short book, he presents a discursive timeline of the linguistic quirks of digital interactivity. From framing to flaming, from emoticons to text speak, can we ever communicate effectively in our digital realms?

The book is based on a lecture given as part of the Hilda Hulme Memorial Lectures, established in 1985 following a donation from Mr Mohamed Aslam in memory of his wife, Dr Hilda Hulme. The lectures are on the subject of English literature and relate to one of ‘the three fields in which Dr Hulme specialised, namely Shakespeare, language in Elizabethan drama, and the nineteenth-century...

Rosemary Ashton
June 12, 2020

When the Victorian journalist and critic, George Henry Lewes invited George Eliot and Charles Dickens to dinner in 1859, few imagined it would lead to one of the greatest creative exchanges in literary history.

From the non-traditional ‘marriage’ of Eliot and Lewes, to the unconventional eye Lewes cast over Dickens’ work, this book throws fresh light on the chief subject of their critical interest by looking at the complex relationships between Dickens, Eliot and Lewes. It contends that Lewes saw something in Dickens and Eliot that his contemporaries could not grasp, and traces the birth of ‘psychological realism’ as a literary device in English literature.

The book is based on a...

Edited by Linden Thomas and Nick Johnson
May 29, 2020

The Clinical Legal Education Handbook is intended to act as a good practice guide and practical resource for those engaged in the design and delivery of clinical legal education programmes at university law schools. The Handbook is primarily aimed at clinics in England and Wales, but is likely to have content that is of interest to those engaged in clinic in other jurisdictions. The Handbook offers direction on how to establish and run student law clinics and sets out guidance on both the pedagogical and regulatory considerations involved in the delivery of clinical programmes. It also provides an introduction to the existing body of research and scholarship on Clinical Legal Education (CLE).

CLE has become an increasingly...

Christopher Phillips
April 30, 2020

The war of 1914–18 was the first great conflict to be fought between highly industrial societies able to manufacture and transport immense quantities of goods to the field of battle. In Civilian Specialists at War, Christopher Phillips examines the manner in which Britain’s industrial society influenced the character and conduct of industrial warfare. This book analyses the multiple connections between the military, the government and the senior executives of some of pre-war Britain’s largest companies. It illustrates the British army’s evolving response to the First World War and the role to be played by non-military expertise in the prosecution of such a conflict.

This study demonstrates that pre-existing professional...

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