Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

A.D. Morrison
October 1, 2007
Pindar’s fifteen victory odes for Sicilian victors include some of Pindar’s most impressive and widely admired poems, such as the first two Olympians and first three Pythians. The majority of the Sicilian odes date from between about 476 to 466 BC and were composed to celebrate the victories of the great tyrants of Sicily Hieron of Syracuse and Theron of Akragas or their families or courtiers at the crown games. The Sicilian tyrants made spectacular use of their wealth and power in competing in equestrian events at the games and in commissioning Pindar and Bacchylides to celebrate their victories in song. This book examines the Sicilian odes of Pindar as a group, investigating the ways in which they interact and exploit their overlapping...
Fay Glinister and Clare Woods and edited by J.A. North and M.H. Crawford
October 1, 2007
Burned, water-damaged, lost for centuries – the text we know today as ‘Festus’ barely survived to the modern era, but since its re-discovery in the fifteenth century it has exercised some of the greatest minds in the history of scholarship. Today the sole surviving manuscript lies in the airy calm of the Biblioteca Nazionale at Naples, a precious link to the great outpouring of scholarship during the last centuries of the Roman Republic.

Festus’ Lexicon took shape over several centuries through the efforts of three men in particular: Verrius Flaccus, the antiquarian who rose from humble origins to enjoy a successful career in the service of the emperor Augustus; Festus, an obscure intellectual who abridged Verrius’ monumental work...
Ulrike Roth
July 1, 2007
Thinking Tools sets out to question the prevalent assumption that the slave economy of late Republican and early Imperial Italy was based on a largely adult male slave population. The author draws both on a close reading of the Roman agricultural writers and on visual and archaeological evidence to argue that the Roman villas of the Italian countryside were normally staffed by slave families.In doing so, she both demonstrates the role of female labour in the productive landscape of Roman Italy and radically revises our estimate of the economic potential of the slave estates in Italy created by the development of the Roman empire overseas. Thinking Tools provides fresh insights into everyday nutrition and...
Edited by John Drinkwater and Benet Salway
July 1, 2007
Wolf Liebeschuetz is one of the most distinguished, creative and best-liked of contemporary Ancient Historians. In his fifty-year career of teaching and publication Wolf, German-born and British-educated, has informed generations of scholars – collaborating, instructing, disputing and commenting on research.In this volume, coinciding with his eightieth birthday, twenty historians and archaeologists who have known Wolf as friends, colleagues and pupils acknowledge and celebrate his influence by presenting papers on topics related to his four monographs: Antioch: City and Imperial Administration in the Later Roman Empire (1972); Continuity and Change in Roman Religion (1980); Barbarians and Bishops...
Elena Isayev
February 1, 2007
A traveller today on a journey through the mountainous landscape of ancient Lucania would find it difficult to believe the high density of settlement which this corner of south-west Italy sustained in the fourth century BC. Networks incorporating much of the peninsula, Greece, Sicily, Epirus, Macedon and Carthage all found a foothold here. Ancient narratives, largely focusing on military contexts, give little sense of the nature of activity in the area, but the remains of material culture provide an image of thriving communities, not organised on the city-state model, which were active participants in the culture and power struggles of the Mediterranean in the period before Roman hegemony. This study brings together historical and...
Roy K. Gibson
February 1, 2007
Ovid’s Ars Amatoria has long had a reputation for ‘excess’, both moral and stylistic. Augustus’ banishment of the poet to Romania in 8 AD – for teaching ‘foul adultery’ in the Ars – is partly responsible for this reputation, along with Roman love elegy’s well-known predilection for immoderate attitudes and alienation from the values of conventional society. The Ars is undoubtedly a work of subversive tendencies, but its larger reputation has made it difficult for readers to appreciate one of the most striking, yet characteristic, features of the poem. In the pursuit of erotic ends, Ovid recommends to his pupils stratagems of moderation and self-restraint. Ovid’s (hedonistic) middle way is both a novelty for elegy, which is more accustomed...
Edited by Paul Holder
June 9, 2006
Roman Military Diplomas V presents 154 diplomas, and incorporates them into the updated chronologies witness lists and indexes which are a key part of the Roman Military Diplomas series.

A few of the diplomas were prepared by the late Margaret Roxan and some others were found after her death in preparation. Otherwise, the intention has been to bring together diplomas published by the end of 2003. But the large number included in this volume also reflects the active interest of collectors and the results of metal detecting. 

The lively market in diplomas has, however, also had less benign consequences and the volume has an important appendix on the production of fakes.

The volume...
Edited by John Davison, Frances Muecke, and Peter Wilson
March 31, 2006
This volume vividly demonstrates the richness and wide scope of contemporary engagement with Greek drama in scholarship and performance.

Key studies of the interaction between performance, politics and society range from the detection of Sophocles' infiltration of the culture through different kinds of evidence B not a linear narrative but a 'mosaic' B to modern performance in South Africa. Gender issues explored include Euripides' interest in female experience, especially the subjection of young women to male violence, and a study of representations in tragedy of homosexuality and pederasty.The role of drama, both tragedy and comedy, in the creation of Athenian identity includes a review of the way that dramatists used the Trojan...
William Stenhouse
July 4, 2005
Reading inscriptions and writing Ancient History shows how the work of a group of scholars active in Rome in the middle of the sixteenth century redefined the scope and nature of historical writing.

Fascinated by the remains of the Classical world and particularly by inscriptions in stone, they began to collect and compare inscriptions, creating systems of classification and ways of representing their finds that shaped all subsequent attempts to do the same. They then began to question the value of inscriptions as historical sources and realised that by looking at them as objects B rather than simply as texts written on a particular durable medium B, they could extract more information, particularly when they examined...
Mohammad Nafissi
June 21, 2005
For over a century the foundations of Athenian political economy have been debated by scholarly camps broadly described as primitivist/substantivist, modernist and Marxist and involving political economists, sociologists and anthropologists as well as historians and classicists.

Ancient Athens and modern ideology demonstrates the dialectic of intellectual and substantive history and offers a consensual resolution to the debate by examining the interplay of values, theories and evidence in the contributions of Max Weber (1864-1920), Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) and Moses Finley (1912-86), widely recognised as successive champions of the primitivist cause. Pursuing Finley’s own ‘official’ account of his intellectual roots...

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