Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

James E. G. Zetzel
June 2, 2005
The Satires of Persius combine powerful criticism of the moral corruption of Rome under Nero with a rich and innovative style that required commentary almost from his own time. The enduring appeal and originality of his poetry also ensured that the exegetical tradition has been continuous from the first century to the present.

Marginal scholarship and textual deviance examines the origins and history of a major component of the medieval commentary on Persius but also has a larger goal. The volume uses detailed study of Carolingian exegesis of Persius to consider wider questions about the transmission and form of the remains of ancient scholarship on Latin poetry. Through these explorations James Zetzel also considers the nature of...
O Krzyszkowska
March 1, 2005
Seals and sealings provide an extremely rich source of evidence for the Aegean Bronze Age. They are truly monuments in miniature, offering insights into art and iconography, craft and technology, social status, administration and more besides.

Aegean Seals is the first comprehensive overview of this fascinating subject, tracing the development of seals and sealing practices from the third millennium to the end of the Bronze Age, with particular emphasis on the great palace civilizations of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.

Copiously illustrated, this study combines original research with critical analysis of specialist literature and presents many recent discoveries.
Edited by Peter Adamson, Han Baltussen, and M.W.F. Stone
January 1, 2005

This two volume Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies represents the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute on 27-29 June, 2002 in honour of Richard Sorabji.


These volumes, which are intended to build on the massive achievement of Professor Sorabji’s Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series, focus on the commentary as a vehicle of philosophical and scientific thought.

Volume One deals with the Greek tradition, including one paper on Byzantine philosophy and one on the Latin author Calcidius, who is very close to the late Greek tradition in outlook. The volume begins with an overview of the tradition of commenting on...

Edited by Peter Adamson, Han Baltussen, and M.W.F. Stone
January 1, 2005

This two volume Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies represents the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute on 27-29 June, 2002 in honour of Richard Sorabji.


These volumes, which are intended to build on the massive achievement of Professor Sorabji’s Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series, focus on the commentary as a vehicle of philosophical and scientific thought.

Edited by J.J. Wilkes
November 1, 2003
This volume places on record the proceedings of the colloquium held in honour of Dr. Margaret Roxan at the Institute of Classical Studies in May 2002. The theme of the colloquium was the written record of the Roman army, though the scope of the contributions embraced both historical and archaeological topics. Central to the discussions were the military diplomas recording grants of citizenship and other privileges to various categories of military personnel. The study and publication of these important records, of which several hundred are known, was Margaret Roxan’s life work. Over thirty years she worked as a dedicated scholar with minimal help from a few institutions. Her three edited collections of newly-found diplomas have acquired a...
Margaret M. Roxan and Paul Holder
November 1, 2003
This volume presents 121 complete and fragmentary diplomas ranging in date from AD 61 to AD 245. 69 of these diplomas have not previously been published.

These and most of the published diplomas had been worked on by Margaret Roxan. Nine have been prepared by Paul Holder who has also standardized entries and updated references and notes where necessary.

Among the appendixes and indexes are a new ‘Revised chronology of diplomas’ and updated witness lists.

This volume continues Margaret Roxan’s Roman Military Diplomas 1954–77 (1978), 1978-84 (1985) and 1985-93 (1994) which were published as Occasional Papers (Nos 2, 9 and 14) of the Institute of Archaeology,...
Edited by Ingo Gildenhard and Martin Ruehl
October 1, 2003
Classics is, and always has been, political. In the sixty odd years between the birth of the Second Empire and the rise of Nazism, German classics experienced particularly virulent ideological conflicts. Around 1880 a new generation of philologists began to challenge the liberal neo-humanism that had defined the discipline since Winckelmann. Drawing on novel source material and research methods they turned to the irrational transgressive and ‘oriental’ elements of ancient Greece. Though methodologically innovative, their comparative approach to Hellenic civilization in many ways reinforced the racist and anti-semitic discourses of fin-de-siècle Germany.

Out of Arcadia presents a provocative re-evaluation of this...
Edited by Robert W. Sharples and Anne Sheppard
July 1, 2003
Twelve academic essays, given during the Institute of Classical Studies research seminar in 2000 and 2001, examine Plato's vision of the `real world' as he presented it in Timaeus while considering the text's influence on classical philosophers and scientists. Specific subjects include astronomy, the reactions of Aristotle and others to Timaeus , Hellenistic musicology, Proclus' Commentary , comparisons with Aristotle's Physics and mythology.
Edited by Vivian Nutton
October 1, 2002
Volume editor J.G.F. Powell and J.A. North
December 15, 2001

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