Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Edited by Vassiliki Kampourelli
July 14, 2016
This book presents a critical application of semiotic models to Greek tragic space. It thus reappraises certain aspects of the tragic texts themselves by illuminating the semantics of space, that is, the ways in which space may contribute to the creation of meaning. After the formulation of a working model appropriate to the examination of space in Greek tragedy, an analysis of the proposed categories of tragic space follows. The architectural space of tragedy is then examined with particular reference to the ways in which it finds expression in the Theatre of Dionysus in Athens. Drawing widely on the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripedes, the focus turns to the interactions between the proposed categories of tragic space.

Edited by Errietta M. A. Bissa and Federico Santangelo
July 1, 2016
In this volume, seven authors offer distinctive insights into overarching issues in the study of wealth across the Greco-Roman worlds: the sources and maintenance of wealth; the implications for differently organised societies of the division between wealthy and impoverished individuals and groups; and the moral implications of that divide. Some papers address general methodological issues and engage with scholarly debates in sociology and economic theory; others focus on specific historical problems and clusters of evidence. Taken together, the papers open up new perspectives on wealth in the ancient world, its complex relationship with power, and the tensions and contradictions it entails.
Edited by Peter Mack and John North
May 4, 2015

Ovid was the most influential and widely imitated of all classical Latin poets. This volume publishes papers delivered at a conference on the Reception of Ovid in March 2013, jointly organised by the Institute of Classical Studies and the Warburg Institute, University of London.  

It presents studies of the impact of Ovid’s work on Renaissance commentators, on neo-Latin poetry and epistolography, on Renaissance engravers, on poets like Dante, Mantuan, Pontano, Ariosto, Tasso, Spenser, Lodge, Weever, Milton and Cowley and on artists including Correggio and Rubens.  

The main focus of the volume is inevitably the afterlife of the Metamorphoses but it also includes discussions of the impact of Heroides, Fasti, and...

Edited by Christopher Stray and Graham Whitaker
May 4, 2015

This special Bulletin Supplement contains seven essays which deepen and extend our knowledge of classical reception and the history of scholarship. Two of them deal with books: John Davies examines a little-known life of the tyrant Agathocles of Syracuse published in the 1660s in which the more recent ‘tyrant’, Oliver Cromwell, is targeted, while Christian Flow surveys the agendas and self-images of Latin lexicographers from the Estiennes in the sixteenth century to the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, still in progress.

Three essays are devoted to classical journals: Graham Whitaker surveys German nineteenth-century periodicals in relation to F. A. Wolf’s conception of Alterthumswissenschaft; Ward Briggs gives an account of...

Edited by Douglas L. Cairns and Laurel Fulkerson
May 4, 2015

Emotion in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds is now an established field of research in classical studies, but so far scholars have made surprisingly few attempts to investigate the emotions of the two cultures in comparative terms.

In this innovative and timely collection, nine leading scholars make a start on that project. Topics include: differences between the Greek and Roman emotional repertoires; the semantic fields and scripts covered by comparable Greek and Latin terms; the impact of bilingualism; the fate of emotion terms in translation; the way Roman authors deal with the emotional aspects of their Greek literary models; Greek and Roman views of the emotional character of their counterparts in the other culture.

Edited by William D. Furley
April 30, 2015

Menander set Perikeiromene, or the ‘Woman with shorn head’ in Corinth, famous for its beautiful women, at a time when the city's troubles were at their height owing to the Macedonian conquest of Greece. The story reflects in miniature some of the turbulence of the times. A mercenary soldier Polemon returns home from service to discover, as he thinks, that his girl, Glykera, has found another lover. In a fit of jealous rage he shears off her hair and goes off to drown his sorrows with companions. Glykera promptly moves out from Polemon's house to the neighbour's house, in which her purported new lover Moschion lives. But all is not as it seems...

Typically for the genre of New Comedy, Menander takes his characters to the...

Edited by Tesse D. Stek and Gert-Jan Burgers
March 2, 2015
This publication of the School of Advanced Study of the University of London is one of the outcomes of the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project and the Colonial Rural Networks project (NWO, Dr. T.D. Stek). The volume, edited by Tesse Stek and prof. Gert-Jan Burgers of the Free University Amsterdam, explores the role of religion in early Roman imperialism.

The impact of Roman imperialism and expansionism on religious life in the newly incorporated areas...

Edited by Richard Green and Mike Edwards
January 12, 2015

This volume in honour of the late Eric Handley, one-time Regius Professor of Greek at the University of Cambridge and Director of the Institute of Classical Studies, offers a set of essays connected with Eric’s main scholarly interests and written by friends, colleagues, and former students.

Eric’s great love and facility for piecing the past together from whatever fragments of it survive, be they papyri or pots, in different ways inspired all the contributors, and their affection for him is encapsulated in a final Tribute to one of the pre-eminent classical scholars of his day.

Volume editor Anastasia Bakogianni
December 9, 2013
Contents
  • Volume 1. Introduction: in dialogue with the past / Anastasia Bakogianni
  • Section 1. Theoretical approaches and concerns. Chapter 1. The audience in classical reception studies. The problem of the spectators: ancient and modern / Lorna Hardwick
  • Greek tragedy and the modern director / Helen Eastman
  • Chapter 2. Reception and the source text. Hallucination, drunkenness, and mirrors: ancient reception of modern drama / Chiara Thumiger
  • Throwing out the menos with the bath water: the Sophoclean text vs Peter Stein's Electra (2007) / Efimia D. Karakantza
  • Section 2. The classical past in Hellas. Chapter 3. Modern Greek performance reception. All the king's patriots? The Persians within the...
Edited by Christopher Carey and Michael Edwards
December 2, 2013
Some two and a half millennia ago, in the summer of 490 BC, a small army of 9,000 Athenians, supported only be a thousand troops from Plataea, faced and overcame the might of the Persian army of King Darius I on the plain of Marathon.

While this was only the beginning of the Persian Wars, and the Greeks as a while would face a far greater threat to their freedom a decade later, the victory at Marathon had untold effects on the morale, confidence, and self-esteem of the Athenians, who would commemorate their finest hour in art and literature for centuries to come.

This volume, which includes twenty-one papers originally presented at a colloquium hosted by the Faculty of Philology at the University of Peloponnese, Kalamata in...

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