Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

A.D. Morrison
October 1, 2007
Pindar’s fifteen victory odes for Sicilian victors include some of Pindar’s most impressive and widely admired poems, such as the first two Olympians and first three Pythians. The majority of the Sicilian odes date from between about 476 to 466 BC and were composed to celebrate the victories of the great tyrants of Sicily Hieron of Syracuse and Theron of Akragas or their families or courtiers at the crown games. The Sicilian tyrants made spectacular use of their wealth and power in competing in equestrian events at the games and in commissioning Pindar and Bacchylides to celebrate their victories in song. This book examines the Sicilian odes of Pindar as a group, investigating the ways in which they interact and exploit their overlapping...
Edited by J.R.W Prag
September 3, 2007
Corruption in office, pervasive, subversive and perennial, requires the state to examine itself, its ethical values and its ways of working. The prosecution for corruption of Gaius Verres, governor of Sicily, has long been recognized for its exposure of ruthless depredation, of personal debauchery and abuse of office, and for the skilled presentation of the case by Cicero in his speech to the court as prosecutor. Longest of Cicero’s surviving orations and his only prosecution speech, the Verrines are an immensely rich source of evidence for Roman provincial government, for Roman law and above all for the rhetoric of prosecution. Deriving from a colloquium held at the Institute of Classical Studies in 2004, these papers confront directly...
Edited by Richard Sorabji
August 13, 2007
Between 100 BC and 200 AD Rome took up the ongoing philosophy of the Greeks. The extraordinary wealth of ideas is reflected in the four main schools, Platonists, Aristotelians, Stoics and Epicureans, while there are also Pythagoreans who blend with the Platonists there are Pyrrhonian sceptics and there are Cynics who cannot easily be called a school. Then there are the individuals who call for separate treatment. These include Cicero Philo of Alexandria – a commentator on the books of Moses in the Old Testament – and two of the West’s greatest-ever scientists, Ptolemy in astronomy and Galen in medicine.There were major new developments in all the schools but despite its importance the large number of schools and individuals has itself...
Ulrike Roth
July 1, 2007
Thinking Tools sets out to question the prevalent assumption that the slave economy of late Republican and early Imperial Italy was based on a largely adult male slave population. The author draws both on a close reading of the Roman agricultural writers and on visual and archaeological evidence to argue that the Roman villas of the Italian countryside were normally staffed by slave families.In doing so, she both demonstrates the role of female labour in the productive landscape of Roman Italy and radically revises our estimate of the economic potential of the slave estates in Italy created by the development of the Roman empire overseas. Thinking Tools provides fresh insights into everyday nutrition and...
Edited by John Drinkwater and Benet Salway
July 1, 2007
Wolf Liebeschuetz is one of the most distinguished, creative and best-liked of contemporary Ancient Historians. In his fifty-year career of teaching and publication Wolf, German-born and British-educated, has informed generations of scholars – collaborating, instructing, disputing and commenting on research.In this volume, coinciding with his eightieth birthday, twenty historians and archaeologists who have known Wolf as friends, colleagues and pupils acknowledge and celebrate his influence by presenting papers on topics related to his four monographs: Antioch: City and Imperial Administration in the Later Roman Empire (1972); Continuity and Change in Roman Religion (1980); Barbarians and Bishops...
Edited by Christopher Stray
June 4, 2007
Classical Books explores the interface between the history of books and the history of classical scholarship. Its contributors investigate the background to the production of texts, editions, histories and dictionaries many of which are now taken for granted by scholars. Abandoned authors blind alleys, false starts and fierce competition: Classical Books takes us behind the placid facades on library shelves to the processes of commissioning, writing, editing, design and printing which led to the publication of the books we use. Some of the books discussed were the work of major figures in nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholarship B Jowett, Murray, Jebb, Wilamowitz B but many lesser-known scholars also...
Roy K. Gibson
February 1, 2007
Ovid’s Ars Amatoria has long had a reputation for ‘excess’, both moral and stylistic. Augustus’ banishment of the poet to Romania in 8 AD – for teaching ‘foul adultery’ in the Ars – is partly responsible for this reputation, along with Roman love elegy’s well-known predilection for immoderate attitudes and alienation from the values of conventional society. The Ars is undoubtedly a work of subversive tendencies, but its larger reputation has made it difficult for readers to appreciate one of the most striking, yet characteristic, features of the poem. In the pursuit of erotic ends, Ovid recommends to his pupils stratagems of moderation and self-restraint. Ovid’s (hedonistic) middle way is both a novelty for elegy, which is more accustomed...
Elena Isayev
February 1, 2007
A traveller today on a journey through the mountainous landscape of ancient Lucania would find it difficult to believe the high density of settlement which this corner of south-west Italy sustained in the fourth century BC. Networks incorporating much of the peninsula, Greece, Sicily, Epirus, Macedon and Carthage all found a foothold here. Ancient narratives, largely focusing on military contexts, give little sense of the nature of activity in the area, but the remains of material culture provide an image of thriving communities, not organised on the city-state model, which were active participants in the culture and power struggles of the Mediterranean in the period before Roman hegemony. This study brings together historical and...
Edited by George Karamanolis and Anne Sheppard
October 5, 2006
As the study of later ancient philosophy has developed in recent years, it has offered new insights into both the continuing vigour of the Greco-Roman philosophical tradition and the interaction of that tradition with the new cultures of Christianity and of the Arab community. This volume addresses a key figure in this interaction. Porphyry (234?c.305 AD) was not only the greatest pupil of Plotinus and editor of his work but also a significant philosopher in his own right. Many aspects of Porphyry’s work have been re-appraised in recent years in the light of renewed interest in Neoplatonism as in later ancient philosophy in general. New editions and translations of Porphyry’s works have appeared enabling up-to-date discussion of...
Edited by Paul Holder
June 9, 2006
Roman Military Diplomas V presents 154 diplomas, and incorporates them into the updated chronologies witness lists and indexes which are a key part of the Roman Military Diplomas series.

A few of the diplomas were prepared by the late Margaret Roxan and some others were found after her death in preparation. Otherwise, the intention has been to bring together diplomas published by the end of 2003. But the large number included in this volume also reflects the active interest of collectors and the results of metal detecting. 

The lively market in diplomas has, however, also had less benign consequences and the volume has an important appendix on the production of fakes.

The volume...

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