Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplements

Edited by Vassiliki Kampourelli
July 14, 2016
This book presents a critical application of semiotic models to Greek tragic space. It thus reappraises certain aspects of the tragic texts themselves by illuminating the semantics of space, that is, the ways in which space may contribute to the creation of meaning. After the formulation of a working model appropriate to the examination of space in Greek tragedy, an analysis of the proposed categories of tragic space follows. The architectural space of tragedy is then examined with particular reference to the ways in which it finds expression in the Theatre of Dionysus in Athens. Drawing widely on the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripedes, the focus turns to the interactions between the proposed categories of tragic space.

William Stenhouse
July 4, 2005
Reading inscriptions and writing Ancient History shows how the work of a group of scholars active in Rome in the middle of the sixteenth century redefined the scope and nature of historical writing.

Fascinated by the remains of the Classical world and particularly by inscriptions in stone, they began to collect and compare inscriptions, creating systems of classification and ways of representing their finds that shaped all subsequent attempts to do the same. They then began to question the value of inscriptions as historical sources and realised that by looking at them as objects B rather than simply as texts written on a particular durable medium B, they could extract more information, particularly when they examined...
Mohammad Nafissi
June 21, 2005
For over a century the foundations of Athenian political economy have been debated by scholarly camps broadly described as primitivist/substantivist, modernist and Marxist and involving political economists, sociologists and anthropologists as well as historians and classicists.

Ancient Athens and modern ideology demonstrates the dialectic of intellectual and substantive history and offers a consensual resolution to the debate by examining the interplay of values, theories and evidence in the contributions of Max Weber (1864-1920), Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) and Moses Finley (1912-86), widely recognised as successive champions of the primitivist cause. Pursuing Finley’s own ‘official’ account of his intellectual roots...
James E. G. Zetzel
June 2, 2005
The Satires of Persius combine powerful criticism of the moral corruption of Rome under Nero with a rich and innovative style that required commentary almost from his own time. The enduring appeal and originality of his poetry also ensured that the exegetical tradition has been continuous from the first century to the present.

Marginal scholarship and textual deviance examines the origins and history of a major component of the medieval commentary on Persius but also has a larger goal. The volume uses detailed study of Carolingian exegesis of Persius to consider wider questions about the transmission and form of the remains of ancient scholarship on Latin poetry. Through these explorations James Zetzel also considers the nature of...
Edited by Peter Adamson, Han Baltussen, and M.W.F. Stone
January 1, 2005

This two volume Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies represents the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute on 27-29 June, 2002 in honour of Richard Sorabji.


These volumes, which are intended to build on the massive achievement of Professor Sorabji’s Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series, focus on the commentary as a vehicle of philosophical and scientific thought.

Volume One deals with the Greek tradition, including one paper on Byzantine philosophy and one on the Latin author Calcidius, who is very close to the late Greek tradition in outlook. The volume begins with an overview of the tradition of commenting on...

Edited by J.J. Wilkes
November 1, 2003
This volume places on record the proceedings of the colloquium held in honour of Dr. Margaret Roxan at the Institute of Classical Studies in May 2002. The theme of the colloquium was the written record of the Roman army, though the scope of the contributions embraced both historical and archaeological topics. Central to the discussions were the military diplomas recording grants of citizenship and other privileges to various categories of military personnel. The study and publication of these important records, of which several hundred are known, was Margaret Roxan’s life work. Over thirty years she worked as a dedicated scholar with minimal help from a few institutions. Her three edited collections of newly-found diplomas have acquired a...
Edited by Vivian Nutton
October 1, 2002
William D. Furley and volume editor Richard Sorabji
October 1, 1996
Edited by Michael Crawford
December 1, 1995