Warburg Institute

No image available
Charles Burnett
January 1, 1987
Gunter Schweikhart
November 1, 1986

Three extant volumes of drawings after the antique together with scattered leaves from yet another sketchbook, by the Bolognese artist, Amico Aspertini, give an unusual opportunity to students of the relations between Renaissance and classical art. One of the volumes dates from the beginning of the century, the other two from the 1530s and later. They make it possible to assess the antiquarian studies of a representative painter of the time in his progress from youth to maturity. They also throw much light on the specific nature of Renaissance use of the legacy of Antiquity.

In 1957 Phyllis Fray Bober’s Drawings after the Antique by Amicl Aspertini made available the relevant drawings from the two sketchbooks of...

Ann Moss
March 1, 1982
Edited by F.W. Kent, Alessandro Perosa, Brenda Preyer, Piero Sanpaolesi, Roberto Salvini, and Nicolai Rubinstein
November 1, 1981

These studies make a companion to Alessandro Perosa’s edition (1960) of pagine sceltefrom the Zibaldone of Giovanni Rucellai (1403-1481). The Zibaldone was intended as a guide to Rucellai’s two sons in the conduct of their lives and is by turns family history, record of things done and seen, book of commercial management, chronicle of artistic patronage, Florentine history, and moral treatise.

The volume now published is centred on the character and achievement of Giovanni Rucellai and, in particular, on the palace which embodies the aspirations of this Florentine merchant patrician. It is the result of collaboration between three Italian, one Australian and one American scholar, under the...

J. B. Bury
March 1, 1981
CONTENTS
  • I. The authenticity of the Roman Dialogues
  • II. Catalogue of Francisco de Holanda's writings, drawings, paintings and architectural designs.
Herrad of Hohenbourg and volume editor Rosalie Green and etc.
December 1, 1979

This is the first reconstruction of the Hortus deliciarum, the unique manuscript of which was destroyed in 1870. The text was established from 19th-century transcripts (principally those made for Comte A. De Bastard), from printed sources, and from C. M. Engelhardt’s record of the German glosses as edited by E. Von Steinmeyer. The miniatures are reproduced from the best copies, some in versions previously unpublished. Variants are also included. All the painted copies are reproduced in colour. The reconstruction restores the original sequence of text and illustrations and is intended to replace the obsolete publication of Alexandre Straub and Gustave Keller (1879-99). The edition was prepared under the supervision of Professor...

Norman W. Canedy
December 1, 1976

Girolamo da Carpi’s sketchbook, here assembled and catalogued by Professor Canedy, comprises the largest single graphic repertory extant of the antiquities known to a fifteenth-or sixteenth-century artist.  More than a thousand sketches survive in the album belonging to the Philip H. and A. S. Rosenbach Foundation in Philadelphia and the portfolio in the Biblioteca Reale, Turin. A few more sheets are preserved in the Department of Prints and Drawings of the British Museum. All the drawings are reproduced, with some comparative material.

Professor Canedy deals with the problems raised by the Sketchbook in a long Introduction. The corpus of Mannerist drawings after the antique and after other artists’ renderings of the antique...

Edited by Walter Friedlaender and Anthony Blunt
December 1, 1974
Bernard Rekers
June 1, 1972
Benito Arias Montano (1527-1598), of the Order of Santiago, theologian, exegete, orientalist, humanist, representative of Spain at the Council of Trent and trusted political and religious adviser of Philip II, was perhaps the most famous Spanish scholar of his age. His chief monument is the great Antwerp Polyglot Bible in eight volumes, published by Plantin between 1569 and 1573, compiled under the supervision of Montano, with an apparatus largely written by him. This book is concerned with lesser-known but important aspects of Monano’s activity, his contacts with Netherlandish scholars of uncertain orthodoxy, his membership of the sect of Familists and his clandestine influence in the spread of Erasmianism in Spain. Based on a corpus of...

Pages

Series