Warburg Institute

Michael Evans
February 1, 1995
Grammar in this context means Latin grammar. Latin means not the language of Cicero and his Humanist epigones but the dialect of international discourse in pre-modern Europe. Basic means enough grammar to enable the reader to construe utilitarian prose with confidence and a dictionary. The method employed is that in use from the time of the Roman grammarian Priscian (early 16th century) until recently: parsing in a text. The text used here is "Elucidarium", ("The Elucidator") which was a a school-book, in Latin and many vernaculars, until the 16th century. It is a dialogue about God, the Church and the Last Things written by the peripatetic scholar Honorius Augustodunensis at the beginning of the 12th century: the edition published here is...
Edited by Michael Crawford
January 1, 1994
Contains papers from a colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in May, 1990. Its theme was the study of antiquity in the middle of the 16th century, and the decisive impact on that study, first of a group of humanist lawyers around Antonio Agustin, and then of the gathering force of Church Reform.
Edited by Jacques Fontaine and J.N. Hillgarth
November 1, 1992
This is a record of an Anglo-French colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in July 1988. The chief preoccupations were the interaction of the Christian religion with 7th-century society and the passage of Latin literature from the Mediterranean to the Celts and Anglo-Saxons.
David Chambers
May 1, 1992
Contains the full texts of Cardinal Francesco Gonzaga's will and the post-mortem inventory of his possessions (1483), together with related correspondence. This book analyzes these texts and provides background information about the man himself and his collections.
Edited by Neil Kenny
April 1, 1991
Investigates the relationship between philosophy and fiction in the 16th century, especially in French vernacular writing. The texts under consideration treat one or more branches of learning, including metaphysics and alchemy but also contain an element of fiction.
Ibn Al-Haytham and translated with commentary by Professor Abdelhamid I. Sabra
December 1, 1989

The Kitāb al-manāẓir or Book of Optics of Ibn al-Haytham, composed in the second quarter of the 11th century AD, consists of seven books (or maqālas) which may be divided into two sections: the first is made up of books I-III and treats the rectilinear radiation of light and colour, and vision produced by rectilinear radiation; the second, consisting of books IV-VII, is a study of reflection and refraction of light and of vision produced by reflected and refracted rays. The present work comprises an English translation of and commentary on the first section, following Abdelhamid I. Sabra’s edition of the...

Jennifer Montagu
April 1, 1989
The devising of an emblem was usually one of the first activities of an Italian academy, and those produced were much used in title-pages, medals, and prints related to the academies. The lack of an index has long proved a stumbling-block for students of emblems, and to those attempting to identify prints or drawings which frequently do not include the name of the academy. This booklet provides an index to the emblems cited by Maylender, with some corrections, and some supplementary material from other sources. It covers both the mottoes and the figures, so that it may be used for identifying preliminary drawings or early unlettered states of prints.
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Edited by Susan Walker and Dame Averil Cameron
January 1, 1989

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