Warburg Institute

Edited by Elizabeth McGrath and Jean Michel Massing
July 23, 2012

This volume explores the imagery of slaves and enslavement – white as well as black – in early modern Europe.

Long before the abolitionist movement took up the theme, European art abounded in images of slaves – chained, subjected, subdued figures. Often these enslaved figures were meant to be symbolic, for slavery was widely invoked as a metaphor in both religious and secular contexts. The ancient Roman iconography of triumphalism, with its trophies and caryatids, provided a crucial impetus to this imagery, particularly for Renaissance artists who developed their own variations. Here the use of classical models had a peculiar force, since nudity, the attribute of antique heroes and idealized abstractions, was the mark of the...

Edited by Rotraud Hansberger, M. Afifi al-Haytham, and Charles Burnett
June 25, 2012
CONTENTS
  • Preface
  • Galen and al-Rāzī on time / Peter Adamson
  • The Ḥikam or aphorisms of al-Ghazālī: some examples / M. Afifi al-Akiti
  • Some Syriac pseudo-platonic curiosities / Sebastian Brock
  • Al-Jāḥiẓ on Aṣḥāb al-Jahālāt and the Jahmiyya / Patricia Crone
  • Jawhar and Dhāt in some medieval Arabic philosophers (or, on 'Dhis and Dhat') / Julian Faultless
  • Le scepticisme et sa réfutation selon al-Malāḥimī / Charles Genequand
  • Mediating the medium: the Arabic Plotinus on vision / Rotraud Hansberger
  • Shīʹī views of the death of the Prophet Muḥammad / Etan Kohlberg
  • Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī's exposition of mayl / Y. Tzvi Langermann
  • ʻĪsā ibn ʻUmayr's Ibāḍī theology and...
Edited by John Glucker and Charles Burnett
April 10, 2012
The essays in this volume illustrate the passage and influence of Greek into Latin from the earliest period of Roman history until the end of the period in which Latin was a living literary language. They show how the Romans, however much they were influenced, to begin with, by the Greek literary language and Greek literature and its forms, were conscious of being not mere conquerors and rulers of the Greek world, but active participants in the further development of the culture initiated by the Greeks; how the importance of ancient Greek culture continued to be felt, with greater and lesser emphasis, in the Western Middle Ages, and the reintroduction of the Greek language in Renaissance Europe only made this interest in the Greek heritage...
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Edited by Dilwyn Knox and Nuccio Ordine
December 12, 2011
The essays collected in this volume have been written by friends and colleagues in memory of Giovanni Aquilecchia, Professor of Italian at the University of London. They cover a wide range of subjects, reflecting Aquilecchia’s interests in Giordano Bruno, Pietro Aretino, Torquato Tasso and Renaissance learning and literature in general. They are all works of original scholarship, with new insights into the subjects that they treat. The volume includes a biographical essay by Laura Lepschy and Dilwyn Knox. Most were delivered in a preliminary form at a conference held at the Warburg Institute in memory of Aquilecchia.
Edited by Zur Shalev and Charles Burnett
May 1, 2011
The rediscovery of Ptolemy’s Geography has long been hailed as a key moment in the emergence of Renaissance culture, symbolizing a new rational spatiality, and preparing the way for the Age of Discovery. And yet, the process of the Geography’s introduction, integration and impact in western Europe, as the essays in this volume collectively suggest, was more complex and less predictable than has been traditionally assumed. Whereas previously Ptolemy’s maps attracted most scholarly attention, in this volume the textual tradition of the Geography – Ptolemy’s text, added prefaces, annotations and treatises – stand at the centre. Bringing together a wealth of previously unexplored sources and contexts,...
Edited by Peter Adamson
April 1, 2011
Much as a previous volume published by the Warburg explored the full range of philosophical developments in the 10th century CE, so this collection of 13 papers by leading scholars looks at philosophical literature of the 12th century. Several contributors discuss the most famous thinker of the period, the great commentator Averroes. But the volume casts a wide net, taking in theologians, “philosophical mystics”, and scientists as well as philosophers, and Jewish philosophy as well as Islamic thought. Apart from Averroes, figures emphasized in the volume include al-Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, ‘Abd al-Latif al-Baghdadi, Abu l-Barakat al-Baghdadi and Suhrawardi.
Edited by Rembrandt Duits and Francois Quiviger
March 1, 2010
Jean Seznec's La survivance des dieux antiques was first published at the Warburg Institute in 1940 and translated into English as The Survival of the Pagan Gods in 1953 It is a classic survey of the afterlife of the deities of classical Antiquity in art and literature during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. This volume of essays is the product of a conference held at the Warburg Institute in 2004, in collaboration with the French research group Polymnia. It presents the current state of scholarship regarding a number of the themes set out by Seznec, covering areas from medieval astronomy to sixteenth-century allegory, and charting the course of the long-term iconographical traditions of mythological figures as well as discussing...
Edited by Maria Pia Donato and Jill Kraye
March 1, 2010
Traditionally thought of as the home of the Counter-Reformation papacy and of the Inquisition, Rome has never been regarded as a major scientific centre. Yet the new research presented here, much of it based on previously unstudied archival material, highlights the special character of science and medicine in the city and its institutions: academies (above all, the famous Accademia dei Lincei), hospitals, libraries, monasteries, universities and courts, as well as the papal Curia and the Congregation of the Index. The approach is thoroughly interdisciplinary, ranging over many disciplines - engineering, architecture, chemistry, botany, mathematics, astronomy and geography - and covering a diversity of topics, from atlases and anatomical...
Edited by Margaret T. Gibson, Lesley Smith, and Marina Passalacqua
March 1, 2010
The number of Boethian manuscripts in the Iberian Peninsula is modest compared with those in the British Isles and Italy, partly, perhaps, because of the Arab domination there; the oldest manuscripts come from Ripoll in Catalonia, which was always under Christian control. The Portuguese manuscripts contain five Boethian items, the Spanish, 153, of which the De Consolatione Philosophiae occurs most often. Some of these manuscripts are of exceptional quality, and many of them include extensive glosses.
Peter Adamson
October 1, 2008
The papers in this volume were given at a conference held at the Warburg Institute in 2006 to consider the philosophy of al-Farabi alongside other intellectual developments of his time together with a wide range of other figures and traditions from the period. The volume initially focuses on the group of Peripatetics working in Baghdad with al-Farabi’s teacher Abu Bishr Matta and his student Yahya ibn 'Adi who worked in the Aristotelian tradition. Other papers look at thinkers working in the Neoplatonic tradition transmitted by al-Kindi’s circle, such as al-'Amiri, Ibn Farighun and al-Isfizari. The Epistles of the Brethren of Purity provide compelling evidence of the fusion of Neoplatonism and Greek science with...

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