Institute of Historical Research

Compiled by Emma Bohan, Zoe Holman, and Maureen McTaggart
June 30, 2014
Edited by Emma Bohan, Zoe Holman, Maureen McTaggart, and Jane Winters
May 16, 2014

Lists nearly 600 theses on historical topics completed and approved in the previous calendar year in UK and Irish Universities. Includes an index of authors and subjects.

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Compiled by Emma Bohan, Valerie Hall, Valerie Hall, Maureen McTaggart, and Jane Winters
February 7, 2014
Janet Cooper
September 2, 2013
Eastnor is the first parish history to be produced by the Trust for the Victoria County History of Herefordshire, and complements some of the work on Ledbury undertaken for the Heritage Lottery-funded England’s Past for Everyone project between 2005 and 2009. In its expanded treatment of the parish history, emphasising the economy and society of the parish as well as landownership and religious life, Eastnor is modelled on the first individual VCH parish history to be published, that of Mapledurwell, Hampshire, in 2012.

Eastnor lies at the southern end of the Malvern Hills and has always been an agricultural parish. In the 19th and 20th centuries it was dominated by the Castle, built between 1812 and 1820, and by its owners, the...
Volume editor Debra Kelly and Martyn Cornick
May 1, 2013
This book examines, for the first time, the history of the social, cultural, political and economic presence of the French in London, and explores the multiple ways in which this presence has contributed to the life of the city. The capital has often provided a place of refuge, from the Huguenots in the 17th century, through the period of the French Revolution, to various exile communities during the 19th century, and on to the Free French in the Second World War.It also considers the generation of French citizens who settled in post-war London, and goes on to provide insights into the contemporary French presence by assessing the motives and lives of French people seeking new opportunities in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. It...
Edited by Elaine Farrell
September 7, 2012
'She said she was in the family way' examines the subject of pregnancy and infancy in Ireland from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. It draws on exciting and innovative research by early-career and established academics, and consider topics that have been largely ignored by historians in Ireland. The book will make an important contribution to Irish women’s history, family history, childhood history, social history, crime history and medical history, and will provide a reference point for academics interested in themes of sexuality, childbirth, infanthood and parenthood.
Janet L. Nelson, Susan Reynolds, and Susan M. Johns
September 2, 2012
The chapters in this volume celebrate the work of Pauline Stafford, highlighting the ways in which it has advanced research in the fields of both Anglo-Saxon history and the history of medieval women and gender. Ranging across the period, and over much of the old Carolingian world as well as Anglo-Saxon England, they deal with such questions as the nature of kingship and queenship, fatherhood, elite gender relations, the transmission of property, the participation of women in lordship, slavery and warfare, and the nature of assemblies. Gender and historiography presents the fruits of groundbreaking research, inspired by Pauline Stafford’s own interests over a long and influential career.
Edited by Matthew Davies and James A. Galloway
August 28, 2012
This volume contains selected papers from a major conference held in October 2008 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Centre for Metropolitan History at the IHR, and the contribution of Professor Derek Keene to the Centre, the IHR and the wider world of scholarship.

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