Institute of Historical Research

Edited by Courtney J. Campbell, Allegra Giovine, and Jennifer Keating
September 2, 2019
Emptiness is a challenging concept: slippery in definition and elastic in meaning. It implies not simply a total lack of content, but an absence: of people, things, ideas and so forth. It thus follows that emptiness is a matter of perception, and as such, is a highly subjective phenomenon, dependent on who is doing the observing and what the subjects expect to find. Yet within the expanding literature on spatial history, comparatively little has been said of the role that emptiness serves or the social, cultural and political processes by which it is produced and maintained. Empty Spaces proposes that the seeming emptiness of rural landscapes, urban environments, air and ocean in history should not be taken at face value. Rather...
Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal and Caroline M. Barron
September 2, 2019
Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929) was arguably the most prolific English medieval historian of the early twentieth century. The son of an unsuccessful publican, he was described at his Oxford scholarship exam as ‘uncouth and untidy’; however he went on to publish hundreds of books throughout his distinguished career with a legacy that extended well beyond the academy. Tout pioneered the use of archival research, welcomed women into academia and augmented the University of Manchester’s growing reputation for pioneering research.This book presents the first full assessment of Tout’s life and work, from his early career at Lampeter, to his work in Manchester and his wide-ranging service to the study of history. Selected essays take a fresh...
Edited by Courtney J. Campbell, Allegra Giovine, and Jennifer Keating
September 2, 2019
Emptiness is a challenging concept: slippery in definition and elastic in meaning. It implies not simply a total lack of content, but an absence: of people, things, ideas and so forth. It thus follows that emptiness is a matter of perception, and as such, is a highly subjective phenomenon, dependent on who is doing the observing and what the subjects expect to find. Yet within the expanding literature on spatial history, comparatively little has been said of the role that emptiness serves or the social, cultural and political processes by which it is produced and maintained. Empty Spaces proposes that the seeming emptiness of rural landscapes, urban environments, air and ocean in history should not be taken at face value. Rather...
Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal and Caroline M. Barron
September 2, 2019
Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929) was arguably the most prolific English medieval historian of the early twentieth century. The son of an unsuccessful publican, he was described at his Oxford scholarship exam as ‘uncouth and untidy’; however he went on to publish hundreds of books throughout his distinguished career with a legacy that extended well beyond the academy. Tout pioneered the use of archival research, welcomed women into academia and augmented the University of Manchester’s growing reputation for pioneering research.This book presents the first full assessment of Tout’s life and work, from his early career at Lampeter, to his work in Manchester and his wide-ranging service to the study of history. Selected essays take a fresh...
Andrew Senter
July 31, 2019
Exploring the changing character of Harwich, Dovercourt and Parkeston through the course of the 19th century, included in this book is the economic, social and political history of the borough. The book provides an overview of the development of areas such as education, religion, public health with a strong focus on Harwich’s maritime history. The borough of Harwich, including the parish of Dovercourt, lies in the far north east corner of Essex. Its coastal location as a natural harbour at the mouth of the Orwell river dictated that Harwich had a prominent role as a port and naval base from the 14th century onwards. In the 19th century Harwich retained its military function, particularly during the Napoleonic and Crimean wars...
Richard Brockington and with Sarah Rose
April 30, 2019
Kirkoswald and Renwick is the first parish history to be produced by the Cumbria County History Trust in collaboration with Lancaster University for the Victoria County History of Cumbria. Covering 30 square miles of agricultural land and moorland, the modern civil parish of Kirkoswald lies between the river Eden and the Pennine heights, on the western edge of the North Pennine Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Kirkoswald township, anciently a market and small industrial centre, lies nine miles north east of Penrith. Until 1566 Kirkoswald Castle was the principal seat of the powerful Barons Dacre of the North whose massive landholdings extended over six counties. In 1523 Lord Thomas Dacre translated St Oswald’s church, a pre-...
Richard Brockington and with Sarah Rose
March 15, 2019
Kirkoswald and Renwick is the first parish history to be produced by the Cumbria County History Trust in collaboration with Lancaster University for the Victoria County History of Cumbria. Covering 30 square miles of agricultural land and moorland, the modern civil parish of Kirkoswald lies between the river Eden and the Pennine heights, on the western edge of the North Pennine Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Kirkoswald township, anciently a market and small industrial centre, lies nine miles north east of Penrith. Until 1566 Kirkoswald Castle was the principal seat of the powerful Barons Dacre of the North whose massive landholdings extended over six counties. In 1523 Lord Thomas Dacre translated St Oswald’s church, a pre-...
Edited by Victoria Blud, Diane Heath, and Einat Klafter
January 3, 2019
This collection addresses the concept of gender in the middle ages through the study of place and space, exploring how gender and space may be mutually constructive and how individuals and communities make and are made by the places and spaces they inhabit. From womb to tomb, how are we defined and confined by gender and by space? Interrogating the thresholds between sacred and secular, public and private, enclosure and exposure, domestic and political, movement and stasis, the essays in this interdisciplinary collection draw on current research and contemporary theory to suggest new destinations for future study.
Edited by Victoria Blud, Diane Heath, and Einat Klafter
January 3, 2019
This collection addresses the concept of gender in the middle ages through the study of place and space, exploring how gender and space may be mutually constructive and how individuals and communities make and are made by the places and spaces they inhabit. From womb to tomb, how are we defined and confined by gender and by space? Interrogating the thresholds between sacred and secular, public and private, enclosure and exposure, domestic and political, movement and stasis, the essays in this interdisciplinary collection draw on current research and contemporary theory to suggest new destinations for future study.
Senia Pašeta
January 1, 2019
Professor Senia Pašeta argues that our understanding of modern Irish and British politics would be enormously enriched if we recognized two things: that the Irish and British suffrage movements were deeply connected; and that the women’s suffrage movement across the United Kingdom was shaped in fundamental ways by the Irish Question from the late nineteenth century and into the twentieth. In other words, the women’s suffrage movement did not exist in a political vacuum. It interacted with, influenced and was influenced by the other main political questions of the day, and with the main political question of the day - Ireland.

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