Institute of Commonwealth Studies

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September 30, 2019
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Edited by Sue Onslow
April 19, 2019
Ala Al-Mahaidi and Léa Gross
February 21, 2019
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Edited by James C. Simeon
January 11, 2019
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The Commonwealth Working Group on Media and Good Governance
October 30, 2018
Edited by Nancy Nicol, Adrian Jjuuko, Richard Lusimbo, Nick Mulé, Susan Ursel, Amar Wahab, and Phyllis Waugh
September 13, 2018
Customers based in the US and Canada, please order from: https://www.sas.ac.uk/envisionthisAmericaEnvisioning Global LGBT Human Rights: (Neo)colonialism, Neoliberalism, Resistance and Hope is an outcome of a five-year international collaboration among partners that share a common legacy of British colonial laws that criminalise same-sex intimacy and gender identity/expression. The project sought to facilitate learning from each other and to create outcomes that would advance knowledge and social justice. The project was unique, combining research and writing with participatory documentary filmmaking. This visionary politics infuses the pages of the anthology. The chapters are bursting with invaluable first hand insights from leading...
Edited by David Dabydeen, Maria del Pilar Kaladeen, and Tina K. Ramnarine
April 30, 2018
Customers based in the United States and Canada, please order from here: https://bit.ly/2GAV2YRThe abolition of slavery was the catalyst for the arrival of the first Indian indentured labourers into the sugar colonies of Mauritius (1834), Guyana (1838) and Trinidad (1845), followed some years later by the inception of the system in South Africa (1860) and Fiji (1879). By the time indenture was abolished in the British Empire (1917–20), over one million Indians had been contracted, the overwhelming majority of whom never returned to India. Today, an Indian indentured labour diaspora is to be found in Commonwealth countries including Belize, Kenya, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and the Seychelles.Indenture, whereby individuals entered, or...
Edited by Malayna Raftopoulos and Radosław Powęska
December 31, 2017
Contemporary development debates in Latin America are marked by the pursuit of economic growth, technological improvement and poverty reduction, and are overshadowed by growing concerns about the preservation of the environment and human rights. This collection’s multidisciplinary perspective links local, national, regional and transnational levels of inquiry into the interaction of state and non-state actors involved in promoting or opposing natural resource development. Taking this approach allows the book to contemplate the complex panorama of competing visions, concepts and interests grounded in the mutual influences and interdependencies which shape the contemporary arena of social-environmental conflicts in the region.

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