Publications search results

Pamela J. Fisher and J.M. Lee
7 April 2017
The parish of Castle Donington  in north-west Leicestershire lies on the south bank of the river Trent, 20 miles north-west of Leicester and 8 miles south-east of Derby. A nucleated village developed on the present site more than 1,000 years ago. A castle was built in the 1150s, and several features of a town soon developed, including a market, fair and hospital. Secondary settlements grew up alongside the Trent, by the King’s Mills and at Cavendish Bridge, the site of an important medieval ferry. Donington Park, which originated in the early 13th century as a hunting park, became a separate estate of the earls of Huntingdon in the late 16th century. Later history has been shaped by strong religious nonconformity and the growth and...
Edited by John L. Flood and Anne Simon
1 April 2017
In 1943, in the midst of a London still reeling from the Blitz, initial plans were laid for an Institute devoted to rebuilding relations between English and German scholars and academics once hostilities had ceased. Established in 1950, the Institute served for more than half a century as a research centre and focal point for researchers the world over. However, German Studies in London have a much older tradition which goes back almost two centuries. Glanz und Abglanz tells the fascinating tale of German Studies in London from its beginnings at the ‘godless institution of Gower Street’, and the remarkable personalities whose energy and commitment ensured that the discipline flourished. The story is told through two essays: ‘Taught by...
Compiled by Lauren De'Ath and Emily Morrell
16 February 2017
Lists over 3,000 people teaching history in United Kingdom and Irish universities and colleges of higher educationGives full degrees and honours for each teacher, with the teaching position heldDescribes each individual’s teaching area and research interestsSupplies the address, telephone and fax number of all departments of historyIncludes email addresses for the majority of individualsGives website addresses for all universities with history departmentsThe online version of Teachers of History, available on the IHR website, can be searched to discover all teachers engaged in particular types of history, geographical area and period, or any combination of these.
Mererid Puw Davies
22 December 2016
The 1960s protest movements marked an astonishing moment for West Germany. They developed a political critique, but are above all distinctive for their overwhelming emphasis on culture and the symbolic. In particular, reading and writing had a uniquely prestigious status for West German protesters, who produced an extraordinary textual culture ranging from graffiti and flyers to agit-prop poetry and autobiographical prose. By turns witty, provocative, reflective and offensive, the avantgarde roots of anti-authoritarianism are as palpable in their texts as their debt to high literature. But due to this culture’s (apparently) anti-literary tone, it has often remained illegible to traditional criticism. This volume presents close...
Edited by Francisco Ferreira and Billie Jean Isbell
22 December 2016
This edited volume brings together several scholars who have produced outstanding ethnographies of Andean communities, mostly in Peru but also in neighbouring countries. These ethnographies were published between the 1970s and 2000s, following different theoretical and thematic approaches, and they often transcended the boundaries of case studies to become important reference works on key aspects of Andean culture: for example, the symbolism and ritual uses of coca in the case of Catherine J. Allen; agricultural rituals and internal social divisions in the case of Peter Gose; social organisation and kinship in the case of Billie Jean Isbell; the use of khipus and concepts of literacy in the case of Frank Salomon; and the management and...
Edited by G Manuwald
15 December 2016
Cicero was one of the most prolific and productive figures from ancient Rome, active as both a politician and a writer. As yet however modern scholarship does not do justice to the sheer range of his later influence. This volume publishes papers from a conference which aimed to enlarge the basis for the study of Cicero’s reception, by examining in detail new aspects of its variety. The conference was held in May 2015, and was jointly organized by the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute, and the Department of Greek and Latin at University College London.   The book presents twelve case studies on the reception of ‘Cicero the writer’ and ‘Cicero the man’, ranging from thirteenth-century Italy to...
Pamela J. Fisher and J.M. Lee
9 December 2016
The parish of Castle Donington  in north-west Leicestershire lies on the south bank of the river Trent, 20 miles north-west of Leicester and 8 miles south-east of Derby. A nucleated village developed on the present site more than 1,000 years ago. A castle was built in the 1150s, and several features of a town soon developed, including a market, fair and hospital. Secondary settlements grew up alongside the Trent, by the King’s Mills and at Cavendish Bridge, the site of an important medieval ferry. Donington Park, which originated in the early 13th century as a hunting park, became a separate estate of the earls of Huntingdon in the late 16th century. Later history has been shaped by strong religious nonconformity and the growth and...
Edited by Luca Bianchi, Simon Gilson, and Jill Kraye
1 December 2016
This volume is based on an international colloquium held at the Warburg Institute, London, on 21–2 June 2013, and entitled ‘Philosophy and Knowledge in the Renaissance: Interpreting Aristotle in the Vernacular’. It situates and explores vernacular Aristotelianism in a broad chronological context, with a geographical focus on Italy. The disciplines covered include political thought, ethics, poetics, rhetoric, logic, natural philosophy, cosmology, meteorology and metaphysics; and among the genres considered are translations, popularizing commentaries, dialogues and works targeted at women. The wide-ranging and rich material presented in the volume is intended to stimulate scholars to develop this promising area of research still...
Lilian Armstrong
1 December 2016
Petrarch (Francesco Petrarca, 1304-1374) worked over many years on his long historical text about the Lives of ancient Roman military heroes, De viris illustribus (On Famous Men). Left unfinished at his death, the text was completed by 1379 by Petrarch’s colleague, Lombardo della Seta. Within a decade, De viris illustribus was translated into Italian; and in 1476 the Libro degli uomini famosi was printed in Poiano outside of Verona by the eccentric humanist and scribe, Felice Feliciano (1433–1479/1480). The edition includes a peculiar feature: preceding each of the Lives is a page on which is printed an interlace woodcut border within which, however, no image appears. The present book surveys the hand-illumination of twenty surviving...

Pages

Series