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Edited by Dirk Miert
1 November 2013
The case studies in this volume juxtapose instances of knowledge exchange across a variety of fields usually studied in isolation: anthropology, medicine, botany, epigraphy, astronomy, geography, philosophy and chronology. In their letters, scientists and scholars tried to come to grips with the often unclear epistemological status of an ‘observation’, a term which covered a wide semantic field, ranging from acts of perceiving to generalized remarks on knowledge. Observations were associated with descriptions, transcriptions, copies, drawings, casts and coordinates, and they frequently took into account the natural, material, linguistic, historical, religious and social contexts. Early modern scholars were well aware of the transformations...
Anna Ayse Akasoy and edited by Charles Burnett and Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim
1 November 2013
Rashid al-Din (1274-1318), physician and powerful minister at the court of the Ilkhans, was a key figure in the cosmopolitan milieu in Iran under Mongol rule. He set up an area in the vicinity of the court where philosophers, doctors, astronomers, and historians from different parts of Eurasia lived together, exchanged ideas and produced books. He was himself involved in collecting, collating and editing these materials, and the substantial oeuvre that resulted is a gold-mine for anyone studying the transmission of knowledge across cultures. By bringing together contributions from the fields of the history of religion, medicine, science and art, this book examines the cultural dynamics of Rashid al-Din’s circle. It addresses questions such...
Edited by Michael Fulford and Emma Durham
4 October 2013
Mass produced at a variety of locations, principally in Gaul and Germany, between the beginning of the first century and the mid third century CE, Gallo-Roman terra sigillata was consumed in very large quantities across the western provinces of the Roman Empire.The large number of records – over 425,000 – now published inNames on Terra Sigillata – the potters, their individual name dies, the associated forms, and the numbers recovered from find  sites – have provided an international resource for fresh, quantitatively-based approaches to the study of terra sigillata, as presented here in Seeing Red.Twenty-six essays by leading international scholars in the field cover a range of themes including: the organization of...
Edited by Helle Abelvik-Lawson, Anthony Hett, and Laila Sumpton
1 October 2013
In Protest: 150 Poems for Human Rights is an anthology of new poetry exploring human rights and social justice themes. This collection, a collaboration between the Human Rights Consortium at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, and the Keats House Poets, brings together writing that is often very moving, frequently touching, and occasionally humorous. The 150 poems included here come from over 16 countries, and provide a rare insight into experiences of oppression, discrimination, and dispossession - and yet they also offer strong messages of hope and solidarity. This anthology brings you contemporary works that are truly outstanding for both their human rights and poetic content.Arranged across thirteen themes - Expression...
Janet Cooper
2 September 2013
Eastnor is the first parish history to be produced by the Trust for the Victoria County History of Herefordshire, and complements some of the work on Ledbury undertaken for the Heritage Lottery-funded England’s Past for Everyone project between 2005 and 2009. In its expanded treatment of the parish history, emphasising the economy and society of the parish as well as landownership and religious life, Eastnor is modelled on the first individual VCH parish history to be published, that of Mapledurwell, Hampshire, in 2012.Eastnor lies at the southern end of the Malvern Hills and has always been an agricultural parish. In the 19th and 20th centuries it was dominated by the Castle, built between 1812 and 1820, and by its owners, the Somers...
Janet Cooper
2 September 2013
Eastnor is the first parish history to be produced by the Trust for the Victoria County History of Herefordshire, and complements some of the work on Ledbury undertaken for the Heritage Lottery-funded England’s Past for Everyone project between 2005 and 2009. In its expanded treatment of the parish history, emphasising the economy and society of the parish as well as landownership and religious life, Eastnor is modelled on the first individual VCH parish history to be published, that of Mapledurwell, Hampshire, in 2012.Eastnor lies at the southern end of the Malvern Hills and has always been an agricultural parish. In the 19th and 20th centuries it was dominated by the Castle, built between 1812 and 1820, and by its owners, the Somers...
Edited by Cynthia Johnston and Sarah J. Biggs
14 August 2013
The exceptionally fine colour images in this catalogue are selections from the R.E. Hart Collection held by the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery. Seven medieval manuscripts and three incunables from the Collection were exhibited at Senate House Library in November of 2013. This project, Blackburn’s ‘Worthy Citizen’: The Philanthropic Legacy of R.E. Hart, was made possible by a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and was generously supported by the Institute of English Studies at the School of Advanced Study, University of London; Winchester University; the Bibliographical Society; the Economic History Society; and the Blackburn Museum itself. Graduate students from the Institute of English Studies, The Courtauld Institute...
Edited by Dyfri Williams
5 August 2013
The sculptural decoration of the Parthenon, conceived at the height of Athens’ power, was deeply rooted in the culture and aspirations of the city-state. The group of huge figures carved completely in the round and set in the triangular gable at the east end, the front of the temple, were perhaps among the most important. This new study by Dyfri Williams uses all the visible clues provided by the sculptures and the floor blocks on which they were once mounted to reconstruct the figures and the way they interacted. Securer identifications for the figures are thus reached and a better understanding of the allusive way the pediment’s subject, the birth of Athena, was treated. To aid the process, a series of sketch-drawings of each...
Edited by Anne Simon and Katie Fleming
1 August 2013
This volume, based on a series of lectures co-organised by the Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies in 2011 und 2012, examines the enduring relevance of Classical material, its openness to multi-layered readings and its use to express contemporary concerns, in other words, its re-presentation, or making present, in German literature. The essays in this volume, which range from the Middle Ages to the present and deal with genres as diverse as poetry and comic books, epigrams and novels, signal that one reason for the enduring relevance of Classical myth lies in its fluidity: its canonicity lends authority but is supple enough to allow adaptation to forms that speak most potently to a given age...

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