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Lynn S. Fotheringham
2 December 2013
This innovative approach to Cicero's persuasive language analyses the style and structure of one of his important speeches in more detail than has ever been done before.It applies ideas from modern linguistics (sentential topic, lexical patterning, interactional discourse), and explores the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis, made easier by modern computing power, in the areas of syntax and vocabulary.The result is a reading of the Pro Milone as a unified text, whether aimed at persuading the jury to acquit Milo or at persuading a wider audience that Milo should have been acquitted. This reading not only contributes to our understanding of late republican discourse, but also suggests a new methodology for...
Edied Christopher Carey and Michael Edwards
2 December 2013
Some two and a half millennia ago, in the summer of 490 BC, a small army of 9,000 Athenians, supported only be a thousand troops from Plataea, faced and overcame the might of the Persian army of King Darius I on the plain of Marathon.While this was only the beginning of the Persian Wars, and the Greeks as a while would face a far greater threat to their freedom a decade later, the victory at Marathon had untold effects on the morale, confidence, and self-esteem of the Athenians, who would commemorate their finest hour in art and literature for centuries to come.This volume, which includes twenty-one papers originally presented at a colloquium hosted by the Faculty of Philology at the University of Peloponnese, Kalamata in 2010 to mark the...
Edied Andrew Gardner, Edward Herring, and Kathryn Lomas
4 November 2013
Questions of ethnic and cultural identities are central to the contemporary understanding of the Roman world.The expansion of Rome across Italy, the Mediterranean, and beyond entailed encounters with a wide range of peoples. Many of these had well-established pre-conquest ethnic identities which can be compared with Roman perceptions of them. In other cases, the ethnicity of peoples conquered by Rome has been perceived almost entirely through the lenses of Roman ethnographic writing and administrative structures.The formation of such identities, and the shaping of these identities by Rome, was a vital part of the process of Roman imperialism. Comparisons across the empire reveal some similarities in the processes of identity formation...
Edied Christos Kremmydas, Jonathan Powell, and Lene Rubinstein
4 November 2013
This volume brings together six papers relating to oratory and orators in public fora of Classical Greece and Rome.Edwards and Bers explore aspects of oratorical delivery in the Athenian courts and Assembly, including the demands placed on orators by the physical settings. Tempest examines the conceptions of oratorical competence and incompetence, particularly in respect of performance, as they are implied in Cicero’s criticisms of the rival prosecutor in the trial of Verres.Papers by Karambelas and Powell look at evidence for the importance of advocacy in the Second Sophistic and the late Roman Empire respectively.In an introduction, the editors discuss recurrent themes connected with the orator’s competence and performance, while the...
Daniel Snowman
1 November 2013
The second Martin Miller and Hannah Norbert-Miller Memorial Lecture
Edied Dirk Miert
1 November 2013
The case studies in this volume juxtapose instances of knowledge exchange across a variety of fields usually studied in isolation: anthropology, medicine, botany, epigraphy, astronomy, geography, philosophy and chronology. In their letters, scientists and scholars tried to come to grips with the often unclear epistemological status of an ‘observation’, a term which covered a wide semantic field, ranging from acts of perceiving to generalized remarks on knowledge. Observations were associated with descriptions, transcriptions, copies, drawings, casts and coordinates, and they frequently took into account the natural, material, linguistic, historical, religious and social contexts. Early modern scholars were well aware of the transformations...
Anna Ayse Akasoy and edied Charles Burnett and Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim
1 November 2013
Rashid al-Din (1274-1318), physician and powerful minister at the court of the Ilkhans, was a key figure in the cosmopolitan milieu in Iran under Mongol rule. He set up an area in the vicinity of the court where philosophers, doctors, astronomers, and historians from different parts of Eurasia lived together, exchanged ideas and produced books. He was himself involved in collecting, collating and editing these materials, and the substantial oeuvre that resulted is a gold-mine for anyone studying the transmission of knowledge across cultures. By bringing together contributions from the fields of the history of religion, medicine, science and art, this book examines the cultural dynamics of Rashid al-Din’s circle. It addresses questions such...
Edied Michael Fulford and Emma Durham
4 October 2013
Mass produced at a variety of locations, principally in Gaul and Germany, between the beginning of the first century and the mid third century CE, Gallo-Roman terra sigillata was consumed in very large quantities across the western provinces of the Roman Empire.The large number of records – over 425,000 – now published inNames on Terra Sigillata – the potters, their individual name dies, the associated forms, and the numbers recovered from find  sites – have provided an international resource for fresh, quantitatively-based approaches to the study of terra sigillata, as presented here in Seeing Red.Twenty-six essays by leading international scholars in the field cover a range of themes including: the organization of...
Edied Helle Abelvik-Lawson, Anthony Hett, and Laila Sumpton
1 October 2013
In Protest: 150 Poems for Human Rights is an anthology of new poetry exploring human rights and social justice themes. This collection, a collaboration between the Human Rights Consortium at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, and the Keats House Poets, brings together writing that is often very moving, frequently touching, and occasionally humorous. The 150 poems included here come from over 16 countries, and provide a rare insight into experiences of oppression, discrimination, and dispossession - and yet they also offer strong messages of hope and solidarity. This anthology brings you contemporary works that are truly outstanding for both their human rights and poetic content.Arranged across thirteen themes - Expression...
Janet Cooper
2 September 2013
Eastnor is the first parish history to be produced by the Trust for the Victoria County History of Herefordshire, and complements some of the work on Ledbury undertaken for the Heritage Lottery-funded England’s Past for Everyone project between 2005 and 2009. In its expanded treatment of the parish history, emphasising the economy and society of the parish as well as landownership and religious life, Eastnor is modelled on the first individual VCH parish history to be published, that of Mapledurwell, Hampshire, in 2012.Eastnor lies at the southern end of the Malvern Hills and has always been an agricultural parish. In the 19th and 20th centuries it was dominated by the Castle, built between 1812 and 1820, and by its owners, the Somers...

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