Publications search results

Colonialism, Dispossession and the Resistance of the Innu
Elizabeth Cassell
1 October 2021

Based on extensive fieldwork and oral history, The Terms of Our Surrender is a powerful critical appraisal of unceded indigenous land ownership in eastern Canada. Set against an ethnographic, historical and legal framework, the book traces the myriad ways the Canadian state has successfully evaded the 1763 Royal Proclamation that guaranteed First Nations people a right to their land and way of life.

Focusing on the Innu of Quebec and Labrador, whose land has been taken for resource extraction and development, the book strips back the fiduciary duty to its origins, challenging the inroads which have been made on the nature and extent of indigenous land tenure—arguing for preservation of land ownership and positioning...

Building Integrity into Data, Statistics and Records to Support the Achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals
Edited by Anne Thurston
1 December 2020

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals initiative has the potential to set the direction for a future world that works for everyone.  Approved by 193 United Nations member countries in September 2016 to help guide global and national development policies in the period to 2030, the 17 goals build on the successes of the Millennium Development Goals, but also include new priority areas, such as climate change, economic inequality, innovation, sustainable consumption, peace and justice.  Assessed against common agreed targets and indicators, the goals should facilitate inter-governmental cooperation and the development of regional and even global development strategies. 

However, each goal presents...

Pierrot Ross-Tremblay
15 November 2019

Following a decade-long research project, this devastating book examines colonial state imperatives to oppress indigenous peoples and history from mainstream national narratives. Through the study of his community, the Essipiunnuat or, ‘People of the Brook Shells River’, the author hopes to combat the erasure of First Nations people from colonial history-books by shedding a light on historical and current systematic and territorial oppression. From land grabs, to genocide and irreversible ecological warfare, the book demonstrates the impact of psychological colonialism on agency and resistance, the value of elders and community story-telling in empowerment and self-actualisation, and the role of the state and local elites in...

The 1997 Edinburgh Summit
Edited by Sue Onslow
19 April 2019
Transcript of Witness seminar of British officials and Commonwealth diplomats involved in the Blair government's hosting of the 1997 Edinburgh Commonwealth Heads of Government Summit
(Neo)colonialism, Neoliberalism, Resistance and Hope
Edited by Nancy Nicol et. al
13 September 2018
Envisioning Global LGBT Human Rights: (Neo)colonialism, Neoliberalism, Resistance and Hope is an outcome of a five-year international collaboration among partners that share a common legacy of British colonial laws that criminalise same-sex intimacy and gender identity/expression. The project sought to facilitate learning from each other and to create outcomes that would advance knowledge and social justice. The project was unique, combining research and writing with participatory documentary filmmaking. This visionary politics infuses the pages of the anthology.

The chapters are bursting with invaluable first hand insights from leading activists at the forefront of some of the most fiercely fought...
Edited by David Dabydeen et. al
30 April 2018

The abolition of slavery was the catalyst for the arrival of the first Indian indentured labourers into the sugar colonies of Mauritius (1834), Guyana (1838) and Trinidad (1845), followed some years later by the inception of the system in South Africa (1860) and Fiji (1879). By the time indenture was abolished in the British Empire (1917–20), over one million Indians had been contracted, the overwhelming majority of whom never returned to India. Today, an Indian indentured labour diaspora is to be found in Commonwealth countries including Belize, Kenya, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and the Seychelles.

Indenture, whereby individuals entered, or were coerced, into an agreement to work in a colony in return for a fixed period of...

3 January 2016
The Overseas Service Pensioners' Association (OSPA) was founded in 1960, with the primary object of the protection of the pension arrangements for Overseas Service officers and widows. But the chief interest now is in spreading a better understanding of what the Colonial Service (since 1954 properly called Her Majesty's Overseas Civil Service - HMOCS) was, who its members were, what they did, why and how they did it, and to what effect. More generally, what was their life like? This information needs to be out on public record so that people today and in the future can know about and have access to first hand evidence of how the colonial territories were governed and developed in the closing years of Empire, especially after 1945.

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