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S. Čače et. al
21 June 2022

This volume is a corpus of seven hundred Greek graffiti on ceramic artefacts from sixteen sites in Dalmatia, ranging in date from the late sixth to the first century BC. Most notably, the catalogue contains a substantial number of pieces from recent excavations at the two sanctuaries of Diomedes, on the central Adriatic islet of Palagruža and the windswept Cape Ploča. Appearing here in publication for the first time, other than in preliminary reports, the size of these two corpora puts them on a level with other published sites of significance including Naukratis and Gravisca, providing an important contribution to Greek epigraphy. As texts, the materials covered in this volume offer insights into dialect usage and letter forms,...

New Discoveries and Interpretations
Peter Higgs
14 June 2022
This major book brings together for the first time all of the fragments of sculpture which formed the metopes from the Temple of Apollo at Bassai. Recent research by the author and colleagues has yielded fresh discoveries in the British Museum, Athens and at the ancient site itself. Further sculptural fragments have been added to this marble jigsaw puzzle, making new joins possible and connections viable, which has greatly enhanced knowledge about the appearance and subject matter of the metopes from this famous temple. The interior frieze of the temple is much better known among scholars and the general public, but the metopes have been neglected with only one full publication including an analysis of the fragments of sculpture as part of...
Studies in Honour of Chris Carey
Edited by Michael Edwards et. al
7 June 2022

The multifaceted agōn – a ‘contest of words’ – is a force formulating classical literary tradition. This book reflects on facets of the agōn and its representations in classical literature across a variety of genres and ideological contexts, from Homer to lyric poetry, drama, law, rhetoric and historiography, and the pivotal role of competition in ancient Greek thought. It sketches out key lines of inquiry pertaining to the study of the agōn as a literary, structural and dialectic form, as a means of authority and power, and as a competitive element in poetic diction and performance. Stimulating fresh discussions under a broad spectrum of theoretical and methodological approaches, this collection of essays explores...

Introduction, Translation, and Commentary
William D. Furley
15 October 2021

Menander’s Misoumenos, or ‘The Hated Man’, is one of his most popular plays to have survived from classical times, to judge from the numerous recovered papyrus fragments. Dating to approximately 300 BCE, it tells the story of a mercenary soldier and the captive girl he acquires whilst on campaign in Cyprus. The play follows the soldier’s growing despair as the girl spurns his advances and slowly turns against him, culminating in his suicidal thoughts.

The play belongs to the ancient genre of New Comedy, of which Menander was the acknowledged master. This edition is the fullest to date of any English language edition of the play. It aims to restore as much as possible of the action of Misoumenos, reconstructing language,...

David W. J. Gill
4 April 2011

‘...what we wanted was to connect ourselves directly with the heart of Hellenic culture so that its very lifeblood might flow through our veins, and this we should gain by the establishment of the school at Athens’

(J.B. Lightfoot, Bishop of Durham)

The British School at Athens opened in 1886 ‘to promote all researches and studies’ which could ‘advance the knowledge of Hellenic history, literature, and art from the earliest age to the present day’. Over the next 30 years the School initiated a major programme of excavations, initially on Cyprus, then at Megalopolis, on Melos, and at Sparta. School students took part in the work of the Cretan Exploration Fund and in the major regional surveys of the Asia Minor Exploration...

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