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edited by Gian Mario Cao et. al
11 November 2019
This volume, containing revised and expanded versions of eight papers originally presented at the workshop The Marriage of Philology and Scepticism: Uncertainty and Conjecture in Early Modern Scholarship and Thought held at the Warburg Institute in June 2012, addresses the question of uncertainty in early modern scholarship and thought. The eight papers confront an array of problems, texts, scholars and intellectual contexts, from introductory assessments of the nature of Greek scepticism, particularly in its relation to ancient grammar and medieval thought, to in-depth analyses of the semantic family of uncertainty, as well as of the notion of divination; from case studies of the textual transmission, and relevant editorial...
Edited by Jill Kraye and Paolo Sachet
19 July 2018
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This volume presents six papers from a one-day colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in February 2015 on the legacy of Aldus Manutius, marking the 500th anniversary of his death, together with three additional contributions. Rather than examining Aldus’s own output, the nine papers focus on how the notion of ‘Aldine books’ has changed over 500 years in Europe and North America, from the early days of the Aldine press to modern and contemporary book collecting and the antiquarian trade. The volume also includes a catalogue of the exhibition ‘Collecting the Renaissance: The Aldine Press (1494–1598)’, held in the...

Edited by Alessandro Scafi
6 June 2016
The Cosmography of Paradise: The Other World from Ancient Mesopotamia to Medieval Europe considers the general theme of paradise from various comparative perspectives. The focus has been on the way the relationship between ‘the other world’ and the structure of the whole cosmos has been viewed in different ages and traditions around the Mediterranean basin, spanning from the ancient Near East to medieval Europe. Scholars coming from different fields discuss in this volume the various ways the relationship between paradise and the general features of the universe has been viewed within their own field of work. The historical formation of the notion of paradise, defined as a perfect state beyond time and space...
Edited by Robert Black et. al
2 May 2016

Albinia de la Mare (1932–2001), OBE, FBA, Professor of Palaeography at King's College London, was one of the last century's outstanding palaeographers and the world's leading authority on Italian Renaissance manuscripts. In November 2011 a conference was held at King's College and the Warburg Institute to honour her memory, and this volume offers revised versions of most of the papers read on that occasion, as well as three additional contributions. Tilly de la Mare had exceptionally wide interests, including key individuals involved in manuscript and literary production, as represented here by studies on Vespasiano da Bisticci, Sozomeno da Pistoia, Matteo Contugi da Volterra, Lorenzo di Francesco Guidetti, Giorgio Antonio Vespucci,...

Edited by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and volume editor Tim Cornell and Oswyn Murray
30 July 2014

In 2008-2009 a group of Arnaldo Momigliano’s disciples met at the Warburg Institute to celebrate the centenary of his birth and to recall the great series of seminars held by him from 1967 to 1983: the aim was to explore the significance of his legacy some twenty years after his death, in all the various areas where he made a major contribution. His seminars had opened the eyes of the participants to the meaning of historical research in their different fields, from ancient Jewish, Greek and Roman history and late antiquity to the study of the historiography especially of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The contributors to this volume have all asked how far his influence still determines the future of our various special areas...

Anna Ayse Akasoy and edited by Charles Burnett and Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim
1 November 2013

Rashid al-Din (1274-1318), physician and powerful minister at the court of the Ilkhans, was a key figure in the cosmopolitan milieu in Iran under Mongol rule. He set up an area in the vicinity of the court where philosophers, doctors, astronomers, and historians from different parts of Eurasia lived together, exchanged ideas and produced books. He was himself involved in collecting, collating and editing these materials, and the substantial oeuvre that resulted is a gold-mine for anyone studying the transmission of knowledge across cultures. By bringing together contributions from the fields of the history of religion, medicine, science and art, this book examines the cultural dynamics of Rashid al-Din’s circle. It addresses questions...

Edited by Dirk Miert
1 November 2013

The case studies in this volume juxtapose instances of knowledge exchange across a variety of fields usually studied in isolation: anthropology, medicine, botany, epigraphy, astronomy, geography, philosophy and chronology. In their letters, scientists and scholars tried to come to grips with the often unclear epistemological status of an ‘observation’, a term which covered a wide semantic field, ranging from acts of perceiving to generalized remarks on knowledge. Observations were associated with descriptions, transcriptions, copies, drawings, casts and coordinates, and they frequently took into account the natural, material, linguistic, historical, religious and social contexts. Early modern scholars were well aware of the...

Edited by Lluis Cabre et. al
20 February 2013
The papers in this volume study the early influence of Petrarch in France and in the Crown of Aragon. They focus, in particular, on Bernat Metge (c. 1348–1413), a prominent member of the Aragonese Royal Chancery, who produced a Catalan adaptation of Petrarch’s Griseldis (from Seniles, XVII, 3–4) around 1388, making a Latin work of Petrarch available for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. Moreover, Metge’s fragmentary Apology(1395?) and his Dream (1399) reveal familiarity with Petrarch’sSecretum, Familiares and possibly De remediis. His fine imitation of Petrarchan models and his interest in classical literature put Metge on a par with contemporaneous writers...
Edited by John Glucker and Charles Burnett
10 April 2012
The essays in this volume illustrate the passage and influence of Greek into Latin from the earliest period of Roman history until the end of the period in which Latin was a living literary language. They show how the Romans, however much they were influenced, to begin with, by the Greek literary language and Greek literature and its forms, were conscious of being not mere conquerors and rulers of the Greek world, but active participants in the further development of the culture initiated by the Greeks; how the importance of ancient Greek culture continued to be felt, with greater and lesser emphasis, in the Western Middle Ages, and the reintroduction of the Greek language in Renaissance Europe only made this interest in the Greek heritage...
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Edited by Dilwyn Knox and Nuccio Ordine
12 December 2011
The essays collected in this volume have been written by friends and colleagues in memory of Giovanni Aquilecchia, Professor of Italian at the University of London. They cover a wide range of subjects, reflecting Aquilecchia’s interests in Giordano Bruno, Pietro Aretino, Torquato Tasso and Renaissance learning and literature in general. They are all works of original scholarship, with new insights into the subjects that they treat. The volume includes a biographical essay by Laura Lepschy and Dilwyn Knox. Most were delivered in a preliminary form at a conference held at the Warburg Institute in memory of Aquilecchia.

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