Publications search results

Anna Ayse Akasoy and edited by Charles Burnett and Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim
1 November 2013

Rashid al-Din (1274-1318), physician and powerful minister at the court of the Ilkhans, was a key figure in the cosmopolitan milieu in Iran under Mongol rule. He set up an area in the vicinity of the court where philosophers, doctors, astronomers, and historians from different parts of Eurasia lived together, exchanged ideas and produced books. He was himself involved in collecting, collating and editing these materials, and the substantial oeuvre that resulted is a gold-mine for anyone studying the transmission of knowledge across cultures. By bringing together contributions from the fields of the history of religion, medicine, science and art, this book examines the cultural dynamics of Rashid al-Din’s circle. It addresses questions...

Edited by Dirk Miert
1 November 2013

The case studies in this volume juxtapose instances of knowledge exchange across a variety of fields usually studied in isolation: anthropology, medicine, botany, epigraphy, astronomy, geography, philosophy and chronology. In their letters, scientists and scholars tried to come to grips with the often unclear epistemological status of an ‘observation’, a term which covered a wide semantic field, ranging from acts of perceiving to generalized remarks on knowledge. Observations were associated with descriptions, transcriptions, copies, drawings, casts and coordinates, and they frequently took into account the natural, material, linguistic, historical, religious and social contexts. Early modern scholars were well aware of the...

Edited by Thomas Frangenberg and Rodney Palmer and prepared for publication by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye
1 June 2013
This book explores biographical, fictional and psychological approaches to Leonardo. What light do these different narratives shed on Leonardo himself, and on the cultures in which they were written?  Why has Leonardo’s life story attracted so much attention? How did anecdotes about Leonardo affect Leonardesque art theory? When and why were myths of Leonardo created, and in what ways have they biased responses to his art?
Edited by Lluis Cabre et. al
20 February 2013
The papers in this volume study the early influence of Petrarch in France and in the Crown of Aragon. They focus, in particular, on Bernat Metge (c. 1348–1413), a prominent member of the Aragonese Royal Chancery, who produced a Catalan adaptation of Petrarch’s Griseldis (from Seniles, XVII, 3–4) around 1388, making a Latin work of Petrarch available for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. Moreover, Metge’s fragmentary Apology(1395?) and his Dream (1399) reveal familiarity with Petrarch’sSecretum, Familiares and possibly De remediis. His fine imitation of Petrarchan models and his interest in classical literature put Metge on a par with contemporaneous writers...
Edited by Elizabeth McGrath and Jean Michel Massing
23 July 2012

This volume explores the imagery of slaves and enslavement – white as well as black – in early modern Europe.

Long before the abolitionist movement took up the theme, European art abounded in images of slaves – chained, subjected, subdued figures. Often these enslaved figures were meant to be symbolic, for slavery was widely invoked as a metaphor in both religious and secular contexts. The ancient Roman iconography of triumphalism, with its trophies and caryatids, provided a crucial impetus to this imagery, particularly for Renaissance artists who developed their own variations. Here the use of classical models had a peculiar force, since nudity, the attribute of antique heroes and idealized abstractions, was the mark of the...

Edited by John Glucker and Charles Burnett
10 April 2012
The essays in this volume illustrate the passage and influence of Greek into Latin from the earliest period of Roman history until the end of the period in which Latin was a living literary language. They show how the Romans, however much they were influenced, to begin with, by the Greek literary language and Greek literature and its forms, were conscious of being not mere conquerors and rulers of the Greek world, but active participants in the further development of the culture initiated by the Greeks; how the importance of ancient Greek culture continued to be felt, with greater and lesser emphasis, in the Western Middle Ages, and the reintroduction of the Greek language in Renaissance Europe only made this interest in the Greek heritage...
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Edited by Dilwyn Knox and Nuccio Ordine
12 December 2011
The essays collected in this volume have been written by friends and colleagues in memory of Giovanni Aquilecchia, Professor of Italian at the University of London. They cover a wide range of subjects, reflecting Aquilecchia’s interests in Giordano Bruno, Pietro Aretino, Torquato Tasso and Renaissance learning and literature in general. They are all works of original scholarship, with new insights into the subjects that they treat. The volume includes a biographical essay by Laura Lepschy and Dilwyn Knox. Most were delivered in a preliminary form at a conference held at the Warburg Institute in memory of Aquilecchia.
Edited by Zur Shalev and Charles Burnett
1 May 2011
The rediscovery of Ptolemy’s Geography has long been hailed as a key moment in the emergence of Renaissance culture, symbolizing a new rational spatiality, and preparing the way for the Age of Discovery. And yet, the process of the Geography’s introduction, integration and impact in western Europe, as the essays in this volume collectively suggest, was more complex and less predictable than has been traditionally assumed. Whereas previously Ptolemy’s maps attracted most scholarly attention, in this volume the textual tradition of the Geography – Ptolemy’s text, added prefaces, annotations and treatises – stand at the centre. Bringing together a wealth of previously unexplored sources and contexts,...
Edited by Peter Adamson
1 April 2011
Much as a previous volume published by the Warburg explored the full range of philosophical developments in the 10th century CE, so this collection of 13 papers by leading scholars looks at philosophical literature of the 12th century. Several contributors discuss the most famous thinker of the period, the great commentator Averroes. But the volume casts a wide net, taking in theologians, “philosophical mystics”, and scientists as well as philosophers, and Jewish philosophy as well as Islamic thought. Apart from Averroes, figures emphasized in the volume include al-Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, ‘Abd al-Latif al-Baghdadi, Abu l-Barakat al-Baghdadi and Suhrawardi.
Science, Medicine and Religion in Rome, 1550 - 1750
Edited by Maria Pia Donato and Jill Kraye
1 March 2010
Traditionally thought of as the home of the Counter-Reformation papacy and of the Inquisition, Rome has never been regarded as a major scientific centre. Yet the new research presented here, much of it based on previously unstudied archival material, highlights the special character of science and medicine in the city and its institutions: academies (above all, the famous Accademia dei Lincei), hospitals, libraries, monasteries, universities and courts, as well as the papal Curia and the Congregation of the Index. The approach is thoroughly interdisciplinary, ranging over many disciplines - engineering, architecture, chemistry, botany, mathematics, astronomy and geography - and covering a diversity of topics, from atlases and anatomical...

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