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Papers of a Conference in Memory of Jean Seznec
Edited by Rembrandt Duits and Francois Quiviger
1 March 2010
Jean Seznec's La survivance des dieux antiques was first published at the Warburg Institute in 1940 and translated into English as The Survival of the Pagan Gods in 1953 It is a classic survey of the afterlife of the deities of classical Antiquity in art and literature during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. This volume of essays is the product of a conference held at the Warburg Institute in 2004, in collaboration with the French research group Polymnia. It presents the current state of scholarship regarding a number of the themes set out by Seznec, covering areas from medieval astronomy to sixteenth-century allegory, and charting the course of the long-term iconographical traditions of mythological figures as well as discussing...
Arabic Philosophy in the Fourth/tenth Century
Peter Adamson
1 October 2008
The papers in this volume were given at a conference held at the Warburg Institute in 2006 to consider the philosophy of al-Farabi alongside other intellectual developments of his time together with a wide range of other figures and traditions from the period. The volume initially focuses on the group of Peripatetics working in Baghdad with al-Farabi’s teacher Abu Bishr Matta and his student Yahya ibn 'Adi who worked in the Aristotelian tradition. Other papers look at thinkers working in the Neoplatonic tradition transmitted by al-Kindi’s circle, such as al-'Amiri, Ibn Farighun and al-Isfizari. The Epistles of the Brethren of Purity provide compelling evidence of the fusion of Neoplatonism and Greek science with...
Edited by Paul Taylor
1 September 2008
Contributors to the conference held at the Warburg Institute in June 2005 were asked to consider the question: how, if at all, can we investigate the iconographic themes of cultures that have left us few or no textual records? Some have responded directly while others have expanded the terms of debate but we hope that all the essays included in this book will be of interest to art historians, archaeologists and anthropologists who are faced with the problem of interpreting visual artefacts that have become divorced from the cultural contexts in which they once had meaning.
Sources and Reception
Edited by Peter Adamson and volume editor Carmela Baffioni et. al
1 August 2007

The nine papers collected here explore a broad range of sources for texts from the classical period of Arabic philosophy, and a broad range of influence exerted by these texts. By the 'classical period' is meant that part of the Arabic philosophical tradition normally included in the canon of 'medieval' philosophy. It begins in the ninth century, which is when the impact of Greek philosophical and scientific works began to be felt, thanks to their translation under the 'Abbasid caliphs, and ends in the twelfth century. This volume focuses on the influences felt by, and exerted by, the four main philosophers of this period: al-Kindi, al-Farabi, Avicenna, and Averroes. But the historical range covered extends well past...

Edited by Christopher Ligota and Letizia Panizza
1 March 2007
The essays in this volume bring together, in a revised and updated form, papers presented at a colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in December 1995. As the title suggests, Lucian is considered both in his contemporary environment and in his Nachleben, and the overall purpose is to show the freshness and resilience of the presence in European culture of an author whose well-aimed satirical wit has, from his time to ours, led to defensive attempts at repression and expulsion from the cultural canon. As Kurt Tucholsky put it, nothing was sacred to Lucian, which makes him a 'friend, cousin, brother, comrade at arms'.
Edited by Paul Taylor
1 June 2006

The essays in the volume study various aspects of the iconography of cylinder seals from the Akkadian period to the Neo-Assyrian period, from Mesopotamia to Hittite Anatolia. The authors deal mostly with concrete cases, including themes such as warfare, the sacred tree, fish and the god Ninurta. An introduction discusses the problems involved in interpreting iconography with few or no texts, and the volume is opened by a memorial of Henri Frankfort, second Director of the Institute, by his successor J. B. Trapp. The illustrations include a wide range of seal impressions.

The book will be of interest to archaeologists and art historians of the ancient Near East, and to comparative iconologists. It was first published in 2006, and...

Edited by W. F. Ryan and Charles Burnett
1 February 2006

The present volume arose from a colloquium on magic and divination intended to apply the study of the history of the classical tradition to the specific area of magic. Magic is interpreted in a very broad sense, and the book includes discussions of Neoplatonic theurgy, Hermetic astrological talismans, the occult activities of oracles and witches, demon-possession, popular beliefs and party tricks. While several articles look at magic in the Graeco-Roman tradition, others deal with practices in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Byzantium and Russia. The emphasis is on showing transmission through time, and across cultural and linguistic borders, and the continuing importance of classical or ancient authorities among writers of more recent periods....

Latin in the Culture of Great Britain from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century
Edited by Charles Burnett and Nicholas Mann
1 December 2005
This volume attempts to bring together, to our knowledge for the first time, aspects of the whole of the long history of Latin as written in Great Britain. The papers explore the use of Latin in different contexts at different periods, from the early Middle Ages until the twentieth century. They range over the subjects of philology, philosophy, scholarship, humanism and teaching methods, with separate chapters for Scotland and Wales. This book arose from a conference sponsored by the Fondazione Cassamarca, which also contributed generously to its publication.ContentsMichael Lapidge: How ‘English’ is Pre-Conquest Latin.
Peter Dronke Arbor eterna: A Ninth-Century Welsh Latin Sequence.
Maria Amalia D’Aronco: How ‘English’ is Anglo-Saxon...
Edited by Paul Taylor and Francois Quiviger
16 February 2001

This volume contains most of the papers given at a colloquium held at the Institute in 1997. It provides a study of the concept of composition in European art and art literature from the middle ages to the early twentieth century. Some authors are concerned to show the extent to which writers on art before 1880 would have been able to think of a work of art in the terms put forward by modernist theorists like Maurice Denis, Wassily Kandinsky and Clement Greenberg, as a flat surface, covered with colours, lines and forms arranged in an aesthetically pleasing way. Other authors aim to show how artists and theorists conceived of composition before the modern period, by describing some of the implications and connotations of the concept...

The Context of Her Thought and Art
Edited by Charles Burnett and Peter Dronke
31 July 1998

This volume offers a comprehensive view of Hildegard of Bingen's manifold achievements, her intellectual background and her reception in the later Middle Ages. It brings together, with full documentation, the contributions of an international group of medievalists, from diverse disciplines, to the colloquium held at the Warburg Institute on 17– 18 November 1995.


Three of the essays are devoted to the cultural landscape in which Hildegard lived and worked – her relation to the writings of the Fathers, to the schools of her own time, and to the prophetic tradition. Two others examine how, after Hildegard's death, she came to be revered as saint and prophet, and two shed new light on the transmission of her manuscripts and of the...

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