Publications search results

Introduction, Translation, and Commentary
William D. Furley
15 October 2021

Menander’s Misoumenos, or ‘The Hated Man’, is one of his most popular plays to have survived from classical times, to judge from the numerous recovered papyrus fragments. Dating to approximately 300 BCE, it tells the story of a mercenary soldier and the captive girl he acquires whilst on campaign in Cyprus. The play follows the soldier’s growing despair as the girl spurns his advances and slowly turns against him, culminating in his suicidal thoughts.

The play belongs to the ancient genre of New Comedy, of which Menander was the acknowledged master. This edition is the fullest to date of any English language edition of the play. It aims to restore as much as possible of the action of Misoumenos, reconstructing language,...

The Economic Relationships of Twelve Tebtunis Families in Roman Egypt
Ryosuke Takahashi
6 September 2021

Tebtunis, an ancient village formerly located in lower Egypt, is one of the most enduring subjects of study from the civilization’s Roman era. This fascinating volume details a dozen family papers that have survived from the second century AD. Belonging to the families of various different classes, this unique documentation provides a rare opportunity to explore how local elites under Roman rule exploited their wealth in the countryside and interacted with its rural inhabitants. 

The Ties That Bind is the first book to investigate these family papers holistically, focusing on the economic activities in which the families engaged: land leases, loans in cash and kind, and the employment of managers and laborers on landed...

Edited by William D. Furley
1 June 2021

In this brand new and exquisite 2021 translation of the classic Greek play, Epitrepontes, or 'The Arbitration', produced around 300 BC, Menander tackles the subject of a broken marriage. Charisios has left his young wife Pamphile over a suspected infidelity and moved in with his neighbour to drown his sorrows in wine and women, specifically, a spirited harp-girl called Habrotonon. The irate father-in-law will not tolerate this waste of a good dowry and demands of his daughter that she divorce. Bravely she holds out against her father's tirades and remains loyal to her husband.

A complex and masterly dramatic sequence ensures that by the end 'all's well that ends well' - and Menander has struck a blow for...

Keeling Lectures 2011-18
Edited by Fiona Leigh
28 January 2021

The present volume collects together papers based on the annual Keeling Memorial Lecture in ancient philosophy given at University College London, over 2011-18 (and one from 2004, previously unpublished). It contains contributions to theoretical as well as practical ancient philosophy, and in some cases, to both. Susanne Bobzien argues that Frege plagiarised the Stoics in respect of logic, Gail Fine compares uses of doxa and epistêmê in the Phaedo to contemporary notions of belief and knowledge, David Sedley offers a novel interpretation of ‘safe’ causal explanation in the Phaedo, and Gábor Betegh understands the ingredients of the soul in the Timaeus as structuring thought and speech...

Edited by F. Bistagne et. al
28 January 2021

Apuleius’ literary and philosophical fortune has been considerable since antiquity, mostly through the reception of The Golden Ass. The aim of this collection of essays is to highlight a few major aspects of this afterlife, from the High Middle Ages to early Romanticism, in the fields of literature, linguistics and philology, within a wide geographical scope.

The volume gathers the proceedings of an international conference held in March 2016 at the Warburg Institute in London, in association with the Institute of Classical Studies. It includes both diachronic overviews and specific case-studies. A first series of papers focuses on The Golden Ass and its historical and geographical diffusion, from High...

Edited by John North and Peter Mack
20 December 2019

 

Herodotus of Halicarnassus and Thucydides the Athenian were the two most famous and earliest (fifth century bce) of the Greek historians whose work survives; their subject was the wars between the Greek cities and the Persian Empire and later those between the Greek cities themselves. Their names are frequently linked and their work compared and contrasted: Herodotus’ history ranged adventurously both in space and time; Thucydides limited himself to the events of his own day. Herodotus’ work is certainly more fun to read; Thucydides approaches more closely to the modern conception of ‘scientific’ history-writing.

This book seeks to explore the reception of their writings from the Byzantine era until...

Kosmas Dafas
14 June 2019

This book presents a new study of Greek large-scale bronze statuary of the late Archaic and Classical periods. It examines the discovery, origin, style, date, artistic attribution, identification, and interpretation of the surviving bronzes, and focuses in particular on their technical features and casting techniques. It contains over 170 plates of photographs and drawings to illustrate its discussion.

It also places the development of the casting techniques in connection with the stylistic evolution in Greek free-standing sculpture. During the Classical period, artists preferred bronze to marble when creating their contrapposto figures. Indisputably, bronze gave particular freedom to artists in creating...

Edited by John North and Peter Mack
31 December 2018

Plutarch’s writings have had a varied reception history from when he was writing in the second century BCE down to today. This volume starts from what may be a translation into the Syriac dialect of a lost Plutarch essay; continues with a tribute from a leading scholar of the later Byzantine period; and follows the centuries of sustained enthusiasm from the Renaissance to the eighteenth century. This period started once a translation into Latin had become available, and ended when scholars in the nineteenth century lowered Plutarch’s reputation as historian, biographer, philosopher, and stylist. By the end of the century, he came to symbolize in the eyes of Tolstoy precisely what history should not be. Both the...

Edited by Greg Woolf
12 January 2018

Pages

Institutes