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A Cabinet of Curiosities
Edited by Mark Thurner and Juan Pimentel
31 March 2021

From the late fifteenth century to the present day, the New World has been plundered and pilfered for its many ‘treasures’ and ‘wonders’ and as a consequence, many of its natural and cultural productions have been scattered around the world, often hidden in libraries, museums and private collections. New World Objects of Knowledge: A Cabinet of Curiosities gathers a fascinating sampling of these scattered objects in forty richly illustrated essays written by world-leading scholars in the field. We discover the secret, often global, itineraries of such things as Aztec codices and Inca mummies, colonial paintings and indigenous maps, giant tortoises and precious hummingbirds. 


Linda A. Newson and translated by Adolfo Bonilla
12 March 2021
Acompañada de una nueva introducción, esta traducción al español del clásico libro, Indian Survival in Colonial Nicaragua, ofrece una descripción detallada de los cambios demográficos y culturales que la conquista española y el dominio colonial trajeron a las sociedades indígenas de Nicaragua. Muestra cómo la naturaleza de las propias sociedades indígenas y la forma en que los españoles buscaron controlarlas y explotarlas se reflejaron en diferentes niveles de disminución y supervivencia de la población.

Se basa en una extensa investigación de archivos en América Central y España y en evidencia arqueológica, etnográfica y lingüística. Contribuye significativamente a comprender cómo algunas sociedades...
The Meaning and Memory of Deindustrialization in Postwar Scotland
Ewan Gibbs
15 February 2021

The flooding and subsequent closure of Scotland’s last deep coal mine in 2002 brought a centuries long saga to an end. Villages and towns across the densely populated Central Belt owe their existence to coal mining’s expansion during the nineteenth century and its maturation in the twentieth. Colliery closures and job losses were not just experienced in economic terms: they had profound implications for what it meant to be a worker, a Scot and a resident of an industrial settlement. Coal Country presents the first book-length account of deindustrialization in the Scottish coalfields. It draws on archival research using records from UK government, the nationalized coal industry and trade unions, as well as the...

Rare Books and Manuscripts in the R.E. Hart Collection, Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery
Edited by Cynthia Johnston
1 February 2021

A British Book Collector celebrates one of the finest collections of manuscripts and rare books in the north west of England. From the turn of the twentieth century through the Second World War, Robert Edward Hart, a ropemaker of Blackburn, Lancashire, quietly amassed a phenomenal collection of medieval manuscripts and early printed books.

In this volume, leading scholars from the fields of the history of art, and the history of the book, examine anew the internationally important manuscripts and rare printed books in Hart’s collection, and the practice of collecting itself in the context of the waning of the industrial revolution. Copiously illustrated with colour prints, this volume marks R...

Keeling Lectures 2011-18
Edited by Fiona Leigh
22 January 2021

The present volume collects together papers based on the annual Keeling Memorial Lecture in ancient philosophy given at University College London, over 2011-18 (and one from 2004, previously unpublished). It contains contributions to theoretical as well as practical ancient philosophy, and in some cases, to both. Susanne Bobzien argues that Frege plagiarised the Stoics in respect of logic, Gail Fine compares uses of doxa and epistêmê in the Phaedo to contemporary notions of belief and knowledge, David Sedley offers a novel interpretation of ‘safe’ causal explanation in the Phaedo, and Gábor Betegh understands the ingredients of the soul in the Timaeus as structuring thought and speech...

Transnational and Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Edited by Guillermo Mira and Fernando Pedrosa
22 January 2021

Almost forty years after the Falklands, the causes and consequences of the military conflict between Argentina and the United Kingdom in 1982 still reverberate in a sea of feverish memories and oblivions. Every aspect of the archipelago that makes up the Falkland/Malvinas Islands (including its very name) is surrounded by complexities, controversies and antagonisms.

This book combines approaches from history, political science, sociology and cultural studies, defined in a broad sense. It includes testimony from war veterans and exiles, essays on the films of Julio Cardoso, Argentine nationalism patriotism as witnessed in contemporary literature and pedagogy.

It moves beyond traditional approaches to the conflict based on...

Edited by F. Bistagne et. al
15 January 2021

Apuleius’ literary and philosophical fortune has been considerable since antiquity, mostly through the reception of The Golden Ass. The aim of this collection of essays is to highlight a few major aspects of this afterlife, from the High Middle Ages to early Romanticism, in the fields of literature, linguistics and philology, within a wide geographical scope.

The volume gathers the proceedings of an international conference held in March 2016 at the Warburg Institute in London, in association with the Institute of Classical Studies. It includes both diachronic overviews and specific case-studies. A first series of papers focuses on The Golden Ass and its historical and geographical diffusion, from High...

Rebecca Maria DeWald
18 December 2020

Reading creates imaginary worlds. Rather than merely contemplating this world, we establish links between the fictional world and the environment we live in. At the same time, the books we read form part of our daily lives, and contribute to the creation of a universe of possible worlds we inhabit. Taking Possible World Theory as a starting point, DeWald re-evaluates and overturns the assumed hierarchical relationship between original text and its translation. Focusing on the translations of Virginia Woolf and Franz Kafka by Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges, the author considers why we insist on maintaining borders between texts. DeWald examines marginal cases of translations and originals (pseudo-translations and...

Building Integrity into Data, Statistics and Records to Support the Achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals
Edited by Anne Thurston
1 December 2020

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals initiative has the potential to set the direction for a future world that works for everyone.  Approved by 193 United Nations member countries in September 2016 to help guide global and national development policies in the period to 2030, the 17 goals build on the successes of the Millennium Development Goals, but also include new priority areas, such as climate change, economic inequality, innovation, sustainable consumption, peace and justice.  Assessed against common agreed targets and indicators, the goals should facilitate inter-governmental cooperation and the development of regional and even global development strategies. 

However, each goal...

Sarah Goldsmith
30 November 2020

The Grand Tour was a journey to continental Europe undertaken by British nobility and wealthy landed gentry during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As a rite of passage, the Tour also played an important role in the formation of contemporary notions of elite masculinity.

Examining letters, diaries and other records left by Grand Tourists, tutors and their families, this book demonstrates how the Tour was used to educate elite young men in a wide variety of skills, virtues and masculine behaviours that extended well beyond polite society. Sarah Goldsmith argues that dangerous experiences, in particular, were far more central to the Tour as a means of constructing Britain’s next generation of leaders than has...

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