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Edited by Siân Pooley and Jonathan Taylor
17 September 2021

Children’s Experiences of Welfare in Modern Britain tells the history of child welfare in Britain and the Commonwealth through the eyes of children. The book brings together the latest research on welfare provided by the state, charities and families in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Britain, demonstrating how the young were integral to the making, interpretation, delivery and impact of welfare services. The ten chapters consider a wide range of investments in young people’s lives, including residential institutions, emigration schemes, hospitals and clinics, schools, social housing and familial care. Drawing upon thousands of personal testimonies, including a wealth of writing by children themselves, the book shows that we...

A Chronicle of Brazil’s Conservative Turn
Edited by Katerina Hatzikidi and Eduardo Dullo
15 September 2021

The 2018 presidential election result in Brazil surprised and shocked many. Since then, numerous debates and a growing body of texts have attempted to understand the country’s, so-called ‘conservative turn’.

A gripping in-depth account of politics and society in Brazil today, this new volume brings to together a myriad of different perspectives to help us better understand the political events that shook the country in recent years. Combining ethnographic insights with political science, history, sociology, and anthropology, the interdisciplinary analyses included offer a panoramic view on social and political change in Brazil, spanning temporal and spatial dimensions. Starting with the 2018 presidential...

The Economic Relationships of Twelve Tebtunis Families in Roman Egypt
Ryosuke Takahashi
31 August 2021

Tebtunis, an ancient village formerly located in lower Egypt, is one of the most enduring subjects of study from the civilization’s Roman era. This fascinating volume details a dozen family papers that have survived from the second century AD. Belonging to families of various different classes, this unique documentation provides a rare opportunity to explore how local elites under Roman rule exploited their wealth in the countryside and interacted with its rural inhabitants. 

Ties That Bind is the first book to investigate these family papers holistically, focusing on the economic activities in which the families engaged: land leases, loans in cash and kind, and the employment of managers and laborers on landed estates...

The Formation of the Galenic Corpus from Antiquity to the Renaissance
Edited by Caroline Petit et. al
25 August 2021
The works of Galen of Pergamum (c. 129-216 CE) were fundamental in the shaping of medicine, philosophy and neighbouring areas of knowledge, from antiquity through to the middle ages and early modern times, across a variety of languages and cultures. Yet, as early as Galen's own lifetime, spurious treatises crept into the body of his authentic works, in spite of his best efforts to provide the public with a catalogue of his own production (De libris propriis). For centuries, readers have used a fluid body of Galenic works, shaped by changing intellectual frameworks and social-cultural contexts. Several inauthentic works have enjoyed remarkable popularity. But this has had consequences in modern scholarship. The current reference...
Edited by Stephen Mason and Daniel Seng
1 August 2021

In this updated edition of the well-established practitioner text, Stephen Mason and Daniel Seng have brought together a team of experts in the field to provide an exhaustive treatment of electronic evidence and electronic signatures. This fifth edition continues to follow the tradition in English evidence text books by basing the text on the law of England and Wales, with appropriate citations of relevant case law and legislation from other jurisdictions.

Stephen Mason (of the Middle Temple, Barrister) is a leading authority on electronic evidence and electronic signatures, having advised global corporations and governments on these topics. He is also the editor of International Electronic Evidence, and he...

Cultural Transfer and Literary Entrepreneurship in the Enlightenment
Tom Zille
30 June 2021

Christian Felix Weiße (1726-1804) is best known as a dramatist and influential children’s writer of the Enlightenment period. This is the first book to explore his singularly extensive output as a literary translator, investigating the conditions which allowed Weiße to become the most prolific German translator of English literature in the eighteenth century, a popular translator of French drama, and an influential editor and ‘entrepreneur’ of the translations of others. Drawing on previously unpublished correspondence, the study examines Weiße’s wide-ranging professional networks as a cultural mediator of European significance. Special attention is paid to his role in the German reception of Ossian, his introduction of English children...

Edited by Fiona McCall
23 June 2021

In 1645, as the First Civil War approached its end, a second Reformation took place which created profound dislocations in religion and in British society. The Church was disestablished, and godly puritan practices promoted in parish churches and everyday life.  Some clergy and parishioners embraced change;  others were horrified, experiencing these as times of madness and trouble. Historians continue to debate the extent of the social disruption that resulted, and the impact of godly ideals. 

With an introduction from Professor Bernard Capp, pre-eminent social historian of the period, this collection of essays assesses interregnum religious practice at ground level, based on a sophisticated...

Edited by William D. Furley
1 June 2021

In this brand new and exquisite 2021 translation of the classic Greek play, Epitrepontes, or 'The Arbitration', produced around 300 BC, Menander tackles the subject of a broken marriage. Charisios has left his young wife Pamphile over a suspected infidelity and moved in with his neighbour to drown his sorrows in wine and women, specifically, a spirited harp-girl called Habrotonon. The irate father-in-law will not tolerate this waste of a good dowry and demands of his daughter that she divorce. Bravely she holds out against her father's tirades and remains loyal to her husband.

A complex and masterly dramatic sequence ensures that by the end 'all's well that ends well' - and Menander has struck a blow for...

Histories of Queer Publishing and Publishing Queer Voices
Edited by Leila Kassir and Richard Espley
12 May 2021

Queer Between the Covers presents a history of radical queer publishing and literature from 1880 to the modern day. Chronicling the gay struggle for acceptance and liberation, this book demonstrates how the fight for representation was often waged secretly between the covers of books at a time when public spaces for queer identities were limited. The chapters provide an array of voices and histories – from the famous, Derek Jarman and Oscar Wilde, to the lesser-known and underappreciated John Wieners and Valerie Taylor. It includes first-hand accounts of seminal moments in queer history, including the birth of Hazard Press and the Defend Gay’s the Word Bookshop campaign in the 1980s.

The book demonstrates how...

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