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Scotland and Caribbean Slavery, 1775–1838
Stephen Mullen
28 October 2022

This important book assesses the size and nature of Caribbean slavery’s economic impact in British society. The Glasgow Sugar Aristocracy, a grouping of West India merchants and planters, became active before the emancipation of chattel slavery in the British West Indies in 1834. Many acquired nationally significant fortunes, and their investments percolated into the Scottish economy and wider society. At its core, the book traces the development of merchant capital and poses several interrelated questions during an era of rapid transformation, namely, what impact the private investments of West India merchants and colonial adventurers had on metropolitan society and the economy, as well as the wider effects of such commerce on...

Edited by Jonathan Alderman and Geoff Goodwin
5 October 2022

From houses to roads, infrastructure provides a unique lens through which to explore social and political change. Serving as an important conduit between states and individuals, infrastructure provides governments with a powerful tool to mould citizens and control populations. Yet, at the same time, it also provides individuals and collectives with a platform to challenge the state and forge alternative forms of citizenship and politics. Infrastructure therefore often reconfigures social and political relations in unexpected ways and never dutifully follows the scripts of politicians, bureaucrats, and engineers.

Latin America provides fertile terrain to explore these issues. The region has been subject to extensive...

Encounters, Controversies, Impact
Edited by Stijn van Rossem and Ulrich Tiedau
29 September 2022

Pieter Geyl (1887—1966) remains one of the most internationally renowned Dutch historians of the twentieth century, but also one of the most controversial. Having come to the UK as a journalist, he started his academic career at the University of London in the aftermath of World War I (1919) and played an important role in the early days of the Institute of Historical Research. Known in this time for his re-interpretation of the 16th-century Dutch Revolt against the Habsburgs, that challenged existing historiographies of both Belgium and the Netherlands but was also linked to his political activism in favour of the Flemish movement in Belgium, Geyl left his stamp on the British perception of Low Countries history before moving back to...

Pamela J. Fisher
20 September 2022

This publication, the fourth VCH Short from Leicestershire, tells the history of Lutterworth, a small market town in the south-west of the county. John Wyclif was the town’s rector from 1374 until his death in 1384, and the ongoing impact of his controversial writings so concerned the Church that his bones were disinterred and desecrated in 1428 on the instructions of the Pope. Lutterworth was also the birthplace of the jet engine, which was developed by Sir Frank Whittle between 1937 and 1942 in a disused foundry building in the town.  

The evolution and development of Lutterworth from small beginnings before the Norman Conquest to the challenges posed today by its position as a key location for the modern...

Courting the Public
Leo Shipp
31 August 2022

The office of the poet laureate of Britain was a highly prominent, relevant and respectable institution throughout the long eighteenth century. First instituted for John Dryden in 1668, the laureateship developed from an honorific into a functionary office with a settled position in court (c.1689–1715), and was bestowed upon Robert Southey in 1813, whose tenure eventually transformed the office. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book examines the office’s institutional changes and public reception, the mechanics of each laureate’s appointment, and the works produced by the laureates before and after their appointments. It argues that the laureateship played a key part in some of the most vital trends in eighteenth-...

The Old Poor Law, 1750–1834
Edited by Peter Collinge and Louise Falcini
29 August 2022

The Old Poor Law in England and Wales, administered by the local parish, dispensed benefits to paupers providing a uniquely comprehensive, pre-modern system of relief. Remaining in force until 1834, the law provided goods and services to keep the poor alive.

Combining short- and long-form articles and essays, Providing for the Poor brings together academics and practitioners from across disciplines to re-examine the micro-politics of poverty in the long eighteenth century through the eyes of the poor, their providers and enablers. From the providence of the parochial sixpence given in order to move a beggar on, to coercive marriages, plebeian clothing and the much broader implications of vagrancy towards the end of the...

From the Thirteenth Century to the Facsimile
Stephen Mason
1 August 2022

This book explores the judicial development of the concept of the signature from the thirteenth century to the age of the facsimile transmission. It puts the concept of the signature into a broad legal context to set out the purposes that can be attributed to a signature, and to explain the functions a signature is capable of performing. Drawing on cases from common law jurisdictions across the world, the book demonstrates that judges expanded the meaning of a signature as technologies developed and were used in unanticipated ways.

Following an overview of the methods used to demonstrate proof of intent and authentication, the book considers the judicial response to the array of variations in the form that manuscript...

S. Čače et. al
21 June 2022

This volume is a corpus of seven hundred Greek graffiti on ceramic artefacts from sixteen sites in Dalmatia, ranging in date from the late sixth to the first century BC. Most notably, the catalogue contains a substantial number of pieces from recent excavations at the two sanctuaries of Diomedes, on the central Adriatic islet of Palagruža and the windswept Cape Ploča. Appearing here in publication for the first time, other than in preliminary reports, the size of these two corpora puts them on a level with other published sites of significance including Naukratis and Gravisca, providing an important contribution to Greek epigraphy. As texts, the materials covered in this volume offer insights into dialect usage and letter forms,...

New Discoveries and Interpretations
Peter Higgs
14 June 2022
This major book brings together for the first time all of the fragments of sculpture which formed the metopes from the Temple of Apollo at Bassai. Recent research by the author and colleagues has yielded fresh discoveries in the British Museum, Athens and at the ancient site itself. Further sculptural fragments have been added to this marble jigsaw puzzle, making new joins possible and connections viable, which has greatly enhanced knowledge about the appearance and subject matter of the metopes from this famous temple. The interior frieze of the temple is much better known among scholars and the general public, but the metopes have been neglected with only one full publication including an analysis of the fragments of sculpture as part of...
Studies in Honour of Chris Carey
Edited by Michael Edwards et. al
7 June 2022

The multifaceted agōn – a ‘contest of words’ – is a force formulating classical literary tradition. This book reflects on facets of the agōn and its representations in classical literature across a variety of genres and ideological contexts, from Homer to lyric poetry, drama, law, rhetoric and historiography, and the pivotal role of competition in ancient Greek thought. It sketches out key lines of inquiry pertaining to the study of the agōn as a literary, structural and dialectic form, as a means of authority and power, and as a competitive element in poetic diction and performance. Stimulating fresh discussions under a broad spectrum of theoretical and methodological approaches, this collection of essays explores...

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