Warburg Institute

Edited by Paul Taylor
June 1, 2006
The essays in the volume study various aspects of the iconography of cylinder seals from the Akkadian period to the Neo-Assyrian period, from Mesopotamia to Hittite Anatolia. The authors deal mostly with concrete cases, including themes such as warfare, the sacred tree, fish and the god Ninurta. An introduction discusses the problems involved in interpreting iconography with few or no texts, and the volume is opened by a memorial of Henri Frankfort, second Director of the Institute, by his successor J. B. Trapp. The illustrations include a wide range of seal impressions. The book will be of interest to archaeologists and art historians of the ancient Near East, and to comparative iconologists. It was first published in 2006, and quickly...
Edited by R.W. Hunt, Raymond Klibansky, and Lotte Labowsky
December 1, 1968
• Some Commentaries on the De Inventione and Ad Herennium of the Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries - by Mary Dickey (pp. 1-41) • The Poems of Hildebert of Le Mans: A New Examination of the Canon - by A. B. Scott (pp. 42-83) • The Origins of the ‘Elements Series’ of the Miracles of the Virgin - by J. C. Jennings (pp. 84-93) • Geoffrey of Aspall’s Commentaries on Aristotle - by Enya Macrae (pp. 94-134) • New Light on Thomas Docking O.F.M. - by J. I. Catto (pp. 135-149) • Autour des uaestiones super Geometriam Euclidis de Nicole Oresme - by V. Zoubov (pp. 150-172) • An Unknown Treatise by Theodorus Gaza (Bessarion Studies, IV) - by Lotte Labowsky (pp. 173-198) • An Autograph of Niccolò Perotti in the Biblioteca Marciana (Bessarion...
Edited by Charles Burnett and Nicholas Mann
December 1, 2005
This volume attempts to bring together, to our knowledge for the first time, aspects of the whole of the long history of Latin as written in Great Britain. The papers explore the use of Latin in different contexts at different periods, from the early Middle Ages until the twentieth century. They range over the subjects of philology, philosophy, scholarship, humanism and teaching methods, with separate chapters for Scotland and Wales. This book arose from a conference sponsored by the Fondazione Cassamarca, which also contributed generously to its publication.ContentsMichael Lapidge: How ‘English’ is Pre-Conquest Latin.Peter Dronke Arbor eterna: A Ninth-Century Welsh Latin Sequence.Maria Amalia D’Aronco: How ‘English’ is Anglo-Saxon...
Jean Michel Massing
October 1, 1995
Erasmus of Rotterdam's "Adages" were first published in Venice in 1500. The Greek and Roman proverbs which he recorded and explained in this book met the Renaissance taste for ancient ethical precepts which could be used as a guide to living in the modern world. In many later editions, the maxims were vastly increased in number and Erasmus's commentaries often lengthened into moral essays. This manuscript provides an early example of the influence, direct and indirect, exerted by Erasmus. In this set of texts, word and image enhance each other in a way that prefigures the emblematic form which was to become so influential throughout Europe. The manuscript was intended for the character training of the future King Francois I. Its texts were...
Ibn Al-Haytham and translated with commentary by Abdelhamid I. Sabra
December 1, 1989
The Kitāb al-manāẓir or Book of Optics of Ibn al-Haytham, composed in the second quarter of the 11th century AD, consists of seven books (or maqālas) which may be divided into two sections: the first is made up of books I-III and treats the rectilinear radiation of light and colour, and vision produced by rectilinear radiation; the second, consisting of books IV-VII, is a study of reflection and refraction of light and of vision produced by reflected and refracted rays. The present work comprises an English translation of and commentary on the first section, following Abdelhamid I. Sabra’s edition of the corresponding Arabic text, published in 1983. A Latin translation of Ibn al-Haytham’s Optics, known as Perspectiva or De...
Edited by M. J. Geller, Herwig Maehler, and A. D. E. Lewis
June 1, 1995
This volume contains the papers given in seminars between 28 February and 16 May 1986 in London. Scholars with an interest in legal history, but working in different areas of the Ancient World – Egypt, Babylonia, Palestine, the Greek East – were invited to look at the way in which the various legal systems interacted, or reacted against one another, once Alexander had imposed Greek law on the countries he had conquered. Since only a few fragments of the actual laws survive, a reconstruction of the different legal systems has to rely to a large extent on the documents which these systems produced. For this reason it seemed best to concentrate on the documents themselves, looking at them from a comparative point of view, in order to discover...
Bernard Rekers
June 1, 1972
Benito Arias Montano (1527-1598), of the Order of Santiago, theologian, exegete, orientalist, humanist, representative of Spain at the Council of Trent and trusted political and religious adviser of Philip II, was perhaps the most famous Spanish scholar of his age. His chief monument is the great Antwerp Polyglot Bible in eight volumes, published by Plantin between 1569 and 1573, compiled under the supervision of Montano, with an apparatus largely written by him. This book is concerned with lesser-known but important aspects of Monano’s activity, his contacts with Netherlandish scholars of uncertain orthodoxy, his membership of the sect of Familists and his clandestine influence in the spread of Erasmianism in Spain. Based on a corpus of...
Edited by Peter Adamson and volume editor Carmela Baffioni, Michael Chase, Peter Adamson, Cornelia Schoeck, Jon McGinnis, Yahya Michot, Toby Mayer, Dag Nikolaus Hasse, and Sajjad Rizvi
August 1, 2007
The nine papers collected here explore a broad range of sources for texts from the classical period of Arabic philosophy, and a broad range of influence exerted by these texts. By the 'classical period' is meant that part of the Arabic philosophical tradition normally included in the canon of 'medieval' philosophy. It begins in the ninth century, which is when the impact of Greek philosophical and scientific works began to be felt, thanks to their translation under the 'Abbasid caliphs, and ends in the twelfth century. This volume focuses on the influences felt by, and exerted by, the four main philosophers of this period: al-Kindi, al-Farabi, Avicenna, and Averroes. But the historical range covered extends well past the twelfth century,...
Edited by Paul Taylor
September 1, 2008
Contributors to the conference held at the Warburg Institute in June 2005 were asked to consider the question: how, if at all, can we investigate the iconographic themes of cultures that have left us few or no textual records? Some have responded directly while others have expanded the terms of debate but we hope that all the essays included in this book will be of interest to art historians, archaeologists and anthropologists who are faced with the problem of interpreting visual artefacts that have become divorced from the cultural contexts in which they once had meaning.
Jennifer Montagu
April 1, 1989
The devising of an emblem was usually one of the first activities of an Italian academy, and those produced were much used in title-pages, medals, and prints related to the academies. The lack of an index has long proved a stumbling-block for students of emblems, and to those attempting to identify prints or drawings which frequently do not include the name of the academy. This booklet provides an index to the emblems cited by Maylender, with some corrections, and some supplementary material from other sources. It covers both the mottoes and the figures, so that it may be used for identifying preliminary drawings or early unlettered states of prints.

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