Warburg Institute

Edited by Paul Taylor and Francois Quiviger
February 16, 2001
This volume contains most of the papers given at a colloquium held at the Institute in 1997. It provides a study of the concept of composition in European art and art literature from the middle ages to the early twentieth century. Some authors are concerned to show the extent to which writers on art before 1880 would have been able to think of a work of art in the terms put forward by modernist theorists like Maurice Denis, Wassily Kandinsky and Clement Greenberg, as a flat surface, covered with colours, lines and forms arranged in an aesthetically pleasing way. Other authors aim to show how artists and theorists conceived of composition before the modern period, by describing some of the implications and connotations of the concept within...
Peter Adamson
October 1, 2008
The papers in this volume were given at a conference held at the Warburg Institute in 2006 to consider the philosophy of al-Farabi alongside other intellectual developments of his time together with a wide range of other figures and traditions from the period. The volume initially focuses on the group of Peripatetics working in Baghdad with al-Farabi’s teacher Abu Bishr Matta and his student Yahya ibn 'Adi who worked in the Aristotelian tradition. Other papers look at thinkers working in the Neoplatonic tradition transmitted by al-Kindi’s circle, such as al-'Amiri, Ibn Farighun and al-Isfizari. The Epistles of the Brethren of Purity provide compelling evidence of the fusion of Neoplatonism and Greek science with contemporary...
Edited by Thomas Frangenberg and Rodney Palmer and prepared for publication by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye
June 1, 2013
This book explores biographical, fictional and psychological approaches to Leonardo. What light do these different narratives shed on Leonardo himself, and on the cultures in which they were written?  Why has Leonardo’s life story attracted so much attention? How did anecdotes about Leonardo affect Leonardesque art theory? When and why were myths of Leonardo created, and in what ways have they biased responses to his art?
Edited by Luca Bianchi, Simon Gilson, and Jill Kraye
December 1, 2016
This volume is based on an international colloquium held at the Warburg Institute, London, on 21–2 June 2013, and entitled ‘Philosophy and Knowledge in the Renaissance: Interpreting Aristotle in the Vernacular’. It situates and explores vernacular Aristotelianism in a broad chronological context, with a geographical focus on Italy. The disciplines covered include political thought, ethics, poetics, rhetoric, logic, natural philosophy, cosmology, meteorology and metaphysics; and among the genres considered are translations, popularizing commentaries, dialogues and works targeted at women. The wide-ranging and rich material presented in the volume is intended to stimulate scholars to develop this promising area of research still...
Dag Nikolaus Hasse
January 1, 2001
In the 12th century the "Book of the Soul" by the philosopher Avicenna was translated from Arabic into Latin. It had an immense success among scholastic writers and deeply influenced the structure and content of many psychological works of the Middle Ages. The reception of Avicenna's book is the story of cultural contact at an impressively high intellectual level. The present volume investigates this successful reception using two approaches. The first is chronological, tracing the stages by which Avicenna's work was accepted and adapted by Latin scholars. The second is doctrinal, analyzing the fortunes of key doctrines. The sense of the original Arabic text of Avicenna is kept in mind throughout and the degree to which his original Latin...
Joanna Weinberg
June 1, 2005
Observations on the Syriac New Testament: A Sixteenth-Century Jew’s Critique of the Vulgate.
Edited by Christopher Ligota and Letizia Panizza
March 1, 2007
The essays in this volume bring together, in a revised and updated form, papers presented at a colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in December 1995. As the title suggests, Lucian is considered both in his contemporary environment and in his Nachleben, and the overall purpose is to show the freshness and resilience of the presence in European culture of an author whose well-aimed satirical wit has, from his time to ours, led to defensive attempts at repression and expulsion from the cultural canon. As Kurt Tucholsky put it, nothing was sacred to Lucian, which makes him a 'friend, cousin, brother, comrade at arms'.
Edited by Felicity Harley-McGowan and Henry Maguire
November 28, 2017
The essays collected in this volume publish the proceedings of a colloquium held at the Warburg Institute in January 2013 to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of Ernst Kitzinger. His work has been, and still is, fundamentally influential on the present-day discipline of art history in a wide range of topics. The first half of the book is primarily biographical, with papers covering his extraordinary career, which began in Germany, Italy and England in the tumultuous years preceding World War II, before leading to internment in Australia and, eventually, to America. The second half of the book is devoted to assessments of Kitzinger’s scholarship, including his concern with the theory of style, with the early medieval art of...
Norman W. Canedy
December 1, 1976
Girolamo da Carpi’s sketchbook, here assembled and catalogued by Professor Canedy, comprises the largest single graphic repertory extant of the antiquities known to a fifteenth-or sixteenth-century artist.  More than a thousand sketches survive in the album belonging to the Philip H. and A. S. Rosenbach Foundation in Philadelphia and the portfolio in the Biblioteca Reale, Turin. A few more sheets are preserved in the Department of Prints and Drawings of the British Museum. All the drawings are reproduced, with some comparative material.Professor Canedy deals with the problems raised by the Sketchbook in a long Introduction. The corpus of Mannerist drawings after the antique and after other artists’ renderings of the antique stands...
J. B. Bury
March 1, 1981
CONTENTSI. The authenticity of the Roman DialoguesII. Catalogue of Francisco de Holanda's writings, drawings, paintings and architectural designs.

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