Warburg Institute

Edited by Maria Pia Donato and Jill Kraye
March 1, 2010
Traditionally thought of as the home of the Counter-Reformation papacy and of the Inquisition, Rome has never been regarded as a major scientific centre. Yet the new research presented here, much of it based on previously unstudied archival material, highlights the special character of science and medicine in the city and its institutions: academies (above all, the famous Accademia dei Lincei), hospitals, libraries, monasteries, universities and courts, as well as the papal Curia and the Congregation of the Index. The approach is thoroughly interdisciplinary, ranging over many disciplines - engineering, architecture, chemistry, botany, mathematics, astronomy and geography - and covering a diversity of topics, from atlases and anatomical...
Edited by Gertrud Bing
December 31, 1998
This essay, first published in 1957 in Fritz Saxl, 1890-1948. A Volume of Memorial Essays from his Friends in England, edited by D.J. Gordon, is reprinted in conjunction with the conference held in November 1998 to mark the 50th anniversary year of Saxl's death.
Edited by Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye and volume editor Kathleen W. Christian, Clare E. L. Guest, and Claudia Wedepohl
July 30, 2014
This interdisciplinary collection of essays, presented at the Warburg Institute in 2009, considers the identity of the Muses in Antiquity and through centuries of their afterlife, tracing their religious, educational and philosophical meaning in classical Greece and their subsequent transformation and re-interpretation in a range of post-classical contexts. Individual contributors consider the invocation of the Muses in different places and at different times by those in search of inspiration, immortality and fame. The volume addresses the concept of the Muses from the perspective of philology, philosophy, art history, antiquarianism and musicology, from Antiquity to the Middle Ages and Early Modern period. It concludes with a discussion...
Edited by Michael Crawford and C.R. Ligota
November 1, 1995
ContentsINTRODUCTION by M. H. CRAWFORDT. J. CORNELL: Ancient History and the Antiquarian Revisited: Some Thoughts on Reading Momigliano's Classical Foundations ..... 1ANTHONY GRAFTON: Tradition and Technique in Historical Chronology ..... 15JEAN– LOUIS FERRARY: Naissance d'un aspect de la recherche antiquaire. Les premiers travaux sur les lois romaines: de l'Epistula ad Cornelium de Filelfo à l'Historia iuris ciuilis d'Aymar du Rivail ..... 33A. C. DIONISOTTI: Claude De Seyssel ..... 73C. R. LIGOTA: From Philology to History: Ancient Historiography between Humanism and Enlightenment ..... 105CHRISTIANE KUNST: William Camden's Britannia: History and Historiography ..... 117L. CAPOGROSSI COLOGNESI: Legal...
Edited by Michael Mallett and Nicholas Mann
May 31, 1996
ContentsE W KENT: The Young Lorenzo, 1449– 1469 ..... 1– 22KATE LOWE: Lorenzo's 'Presence' at Churches, Convents and Shrines in and outside Florence ..... 23– 36LINDA PELLECCHIA: Designing the Via Laura Palace: Giuliano da Sangallo, the Medici, and Time ..... 37– 63ALISON WRIGHT: A Portrait for the Visit of Galeazzo Maria Sforza to Florence in 1471 ..... 65– 92E. B. FRYDE: Lorenzo's Greek Manuscripts, and in Particular his own Commissions ..... 93– 104PAOLA VENTRONE: Lorenzo's Politica festive ..... 105– 116NERIDA NEWBIGIN: Politics in the Sacre Rappresentazioni of Lorenzo's Florence ..... 117– 130KRISTEN LIPPINCOTT: The Art of Cartography in Fifteenth– Century Florence ..... 131– 149JILL KRAYE: Lorenzo and the...
Edited by M. J. Geller, Herwig Maehler, and A. D. E. Lewis
June 1, 1995
This volume contains the papers given in seminars between 28 February and 16 May 1986 in London. Scholars with an interest in legal history, but working in different areas of the Ancient World – Egypt, Babylonia, Palestine, the Greek East – were invited to look at the way in which the various legal systems interacted, or reacted against one another, once Alexander had imposed Greek law on the countries he had conquered. Since only a few fragments of the actual laws survive, a reconstruction of the different legal systems has to rely to a large extent on the documents which these systems produced. For this reason it seemed best to concentrate on the documents themselves, looking at them from a comparative point of view, in order to discover...
Edited by W. F. Ryan and Charles Burnett
February 1, 2006
The present volume arose from a colloquium on magic and divination intended to apply the study of the history of the classical tradition to the specific area of magic. Magic is interpreted in a very broad sense, and the book includes discussions of Neoplatonic theurgy, Hermetic astrological talismans, the occult activities of oracles and witches, demon-possession, popular beliefs and party tricks. While several articles look at magic in the Graeco-Roman tradition, others deal with practices in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Byzantium and Russia. The emphasis is on showing transmission through time, and across cultural and linguistic borders, and the continuing importance of classical or ancient authorities among writers of more recent periods....
Edited by Margaret T. Gibson, Lesley Smith, and Marina Passalacqua
March 1, 2010
The number of Boethian manuscripts in the Iberian Peninsula is modest compared with those in the British Isles and Italy, partly, perhaps, because of the Arab domination there; the oldest manuscripts come from Ripoll in Catalonia, which was always under Christian control. The Portuguese manuscripts contain five Boethian items, the Spanish, 153, of which the De Consolatione Philosophiae occurs most often. Some of these manuscripts are of exceptional quality, and many of them include extensive glosses.
Ibn Al-Haytham, volume editor Abdelhamid I. Sabra, and translated by A.I. Sabra
December 1, 1989
Jennifer Montagu
April 1, 1989
The devising of an emblem was usually one of the first activities of an Italian academy, and those produced were much used in title-pages, medals, and prints related to the academies. The lack of an index has long proved a stumbling-block for students of emblems, and to those attempting to identify prints or drawings which frequently do not include the name of the academy. This booklet provides an index to the emblems cited by Maylender, with some corrections, and some supplementary material from other sources. It covers both the mottoes and the figures, so that it may be used for identifying preliminary drawings or early unlettered states of prints.

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