Institute of Historical Research

David Cannadine
February 19, 2016
"Not only was Churchill the most illustrious and the most distinguished Chancellor that the University of Bristol has ever had, but he was also in his prime, from the 1940s onwards, probably the most famous and the most distinguished chancellor of any university anywhere in the world." David Cannadine
James Galloway
October 15, 2010
The lands bordering the tidal river Thames and the Thames Estuary have historically been highly vulnerable to marine flooding. The most severe of these floods derive from North Sea storm surges, when wind and tide combine to drive huge quantities of water against the coast, as happened to devastating effect in 1953. This project seeks to understand the occurrence of storm flooding in the past, and to explore the ways in which people have responded to the threat.The project draws upon rich surviving documentary sources to study the impact of storm flooding upon the reclaimed marshlands bordering the tidal Thames and its estuary during the period c.1250-1550. Year-by-year accounts of the management of riverside properties have been examined...
Craig Spence
August 1, 2000
At the end of the seventeenth century London was about to become the largest and wealthiest city in the western world. One in ten of England's population lived in the capital, which also housed a vast proportion of the kingdom's riches. That wealth, combined with the great international trade flowing through its wharves and warehouses, earned the city the description 'the vitals of the commonwealth'. Analysing the unique and extensive documentary sources for this significant decade, the author describes and explores a number if key topographic, social and economic measures. Importantly, and so far as the sources allow, seventeenth-century London is treated throughout the analysis as a single entity –  a metropolis, compromising the...
Pamela Taylor
August 31, 2017
Today’s Knightsbridge, the wealthy shoppers’ paradise, is a recent cross-border development. This book breaks new ground by uncovering an earlier, larger Knightsbridge and showing why its initial extent and history have been largely forgotten. Knightsbridge was the southern part of the Westminster abbey manor of Knightsbridge and Westbourne, and until 1900 covered the same area as the parish of St Margaret Westminster Detached. Pre-1900 Knightsbridge/Westminster included today’s Kensington Palace, Kensington Gardens, almost half of ‘South Kensington’, and Hyde Park west of the Serpentine (or river Westbourne). So why was so much of Knightsbridge lost to memory, becoming thought of only in terms of Westminster, Hyde or (until 1900 entirely...
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Volume editor Laura Beers and Geraint Thomas
April 24, 2012
After the First World War, Britain faced a number of challenges as it sought to adapt to domestic conditions of mass democracy while maintaining its position in the empire in the face of national independence movements. As politicians at home and abroad sought to legitimize their position, new efforts were made to conceptualize nationality and citizenship, with attempts to engage the public using mass media and greater emphasis on governing in the public interest. Brave New World reappraises the domestic and imperial history of Britain in the inter-war period, investigating how 'nation building' was given renewed impetus by the upheavals of the First World War. The essays in this collection address how new technologies and approaches to...
Compiled by Lauren De'Ath and Emily Morrell
June 10, 2016
• Lists hundreds of theses on historical topics completed during 2015 in UK and Irish universities • Includes not only history departments, but other departments where historical subjects might be taught • Gives full details of title, supervisor and university • Provides a subject index to aid searching, together with indexes of universities and authors The online version of Theses Completed is published on the IHR's website, where searches can be conducted by type of history, geographical area or period.
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William H. Campbell
September 1, 2014
Six new dioceses were created out of the larger dioceses, having as their cathedrals former abbey churches. These fourteen were known as the New Foundation, as compared with the thirteen medieval secular cathedrals of the Old Foundation. Further substantial reorganisation took place in the eighteen-thirties, and additional dioceses were created to meet the needs of the period.

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