Institute of Historical Research

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M Pearson
January 1, 2003
The volumes in this series trace the process of re-organisation and reform that took place in the English cathedrals after the Norman conquest, with the building of new cathedrals, the establishment of new constitutions for their chapters, and the appointment of foreign clergy. In this period, when many documents are undated, the chronological framework provided by the careers of bishops, dignitaries, canons and cathedral priors, is an essential research tool for historians
Janet L. Nelson, Susan Reynolds, and Susan M. Johns
September 2, 2012
The chapters in this volume celebrate the work of Pauline Stafford, highlighting the ways in which it has advanced research in the fields of both Anglo-Saxon history and the history of medieval women and gender. Ranging across the period, and over much of the old Carolingian world as well as Anglo-Saxon England, they deal with such questions as the nature of kingship and queenship, fatherhood, elite gender relations, the transmission of property, the participation of women in lordship, slavery and warfare, and the nature of assemblies. Gender and historiography presents the fruits of groundbreaking research, inspired by Pauline Stafford’s own interests over a long and influential career.
John Beckett, Elizabeth Williamson, and Matthew Bristow
June 1, 2012
Her Majesty the Queen has graciously permitted the Victoria County History to rededicate its series of county volumes, in celebration of her Diamond Jubilee. The History keeps the name it was given in honour of Queen Victoria when it was founded in 1899 as one of great national projects of that time. It has remained one of the foundations of knowledge about English localities, publishing a remarkable series of encyclopaedic volumes, county-by-county, parish-by-parish. This book is about the Victoria County History of today: how it developed in its early commercial years through the commitment of its General Editors and a team of experts, before becoming a great public project based at the University of London, and now a...
Pamela J. Fisher and J.M. Lee
April 7, 2017
The parish of Castle Donington  in north-west Leicestershire lies on the south bank of the river Trent, 20 miles north-west of Leicester and 8 miles south-east of Derby. A nucleated village developed on the present site more than 1,000 years ago. A castle was built in the 1150s, and several features of a town soon developed, including a market, fair and hospital. Secondary settlements grew up alongside the Trent, by the King’s Mills and at Cavendish Bridge, the site of an important medieval ferry. Donington Park, which originated in the early 13th century as a hunting park, became a separate estate of the earls of Huntingdon in the late 16th century. Later history has been shaped by strong religious nonconformity and the growth and...
Edited by Alex Craven and with Beth Hartland
February 28, 2019
The familiar image of Cheltenham, a large and prosperous former spa town, world-famous on account of its Georgian and Regency architecture, its festivals and educational establishments, masks an earlier history. While numerous descriptions of the town have been published over the years, most say little about the many centuries of its existence before the 1740s, when it began to develop as a fashionable resort. This is the fullest account ever attempted to chronicle those centuries, from the late Saxon period until the 18th century. In this period, Cheltenham developed into a successful small town, ranged along a single main street, with the market and trades serving not only its own needs but also those of the surrounding...
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Edited by Christopher Brooke, Jeffrey H. Denton, and Diana E. Greenway
March 1, 2012
Edited by John R. Davis and Emily Morrell
October 15, 2009
Edited by Anthony Tuck
April 2, 2015

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