Institute of Historical Research

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Edited by Emily Morrell and Jennifer Wallis
June 1, 2009
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Edited by Emma Bohan, Susanne Everill, and Jane Winters
July 20, 2011
John Hare, Jean Morrin, and Stan Waight
January 30, 2015
Janet L. Nelson, Susan Reynolds, and Susan M. Johns
September 2, 2012
The chapters in this volume celebrate the work of Pauline Stafford, highlighting the ways in which it has advanced research in the fields of both Anglo-Saxon history and the history of medieval women and gender. Ranging across the period, and over much of the old Carolingian world as well as Anglo-Saxon England, they deal with such questions as the nature of kingship and queenship, fatherhood, elite gender relations, the transmission of property, the participation of women in lordship, slavery and warfare, and the nature of assemblies. Gender and historiography presents the fruits of groundbreaking research, inspired by Pauline Stafford’s own interests over a long and influential career.
Edited by Mark R. Horowitz
August 1, 2009
John Beckett, Elizabeth Williamson, and Matthew Bristow
June 1, 2012
Her Majesty the Queen has graciously permitted the Victoria County History to rededicate its series of county volumes, in celebration of her Diamond Jubilee. The History keeps the name it was given in honour of Queen Victoria when it was founded in 1899 as one of great national projects of that time. It has remained one of the foundations of knowledge about English localities, publishing a remarkable series of encyclopaedic volumes, county-by-county, parish-by-parish. This book is about the Victoria County History of today: how it developed in its early commercial years through the commitment of its General Editors and a team of experts, before becoming a great public project based at the University of London, and now a...
Edited by Donnacha Sean Lucey and Virginia Crossman
January 23, 2015
This volume explores developments in health and social care in Ireland and Britain during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The central objectives are to highlight the role of voluntarism in healthcare, to examine healthcare in local and regional contexts, and to provide comparative perspectives. The collection is based on two interconnected and overlapping research themes: voluntarism and healthcare, and regionalism/localism and healthcare. It includes two synoptic overviews by leading authorities in the field, and ten case studies focusing on particular aspects of voluntary and/or regional healthcare in Ireland and Britain.
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Edited by Elaine Farrell
November 1, 2012
'She said she was in the family way' examines the subject of pregnancy and infancy in Ireland from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. It draws on exciting and innovative research by early-career and established academics, and consider topics that have been largely ignored by historians in Ireland. The book will make an important contribution to Irish women’s history, family history, childhood history, social history, crime history and medical history, and will provide a reference point for academics interested in themes of sexuality, childbirth, infanthood and parenthood.
Volume editor Debra Kelly and Martyn Cornick
May 1, 2013
This book examines, for the first time, the history of the social, cultural, political and economic presence of the French in London, and explores the multiple ways in which this presence has contributed to the life of the city. The capital has often provided a place of refuge, from the Huguenots in the 17th century, through the period of the French Revolution, to various exile communities during the 19th century, and on to the Free French in the Second World War.It also considers the generation of French citizens who settled in post-war London, and goes on to provide insights into the contemporary French presence by assessing the motives and lives of French people seeking new opportunities in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. It...

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