Institute of Classical Studies

Edited by Douglas L. Cairns and Laurel Fulkerson
May 4, 2015
Emotion in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds is now an established field of research in classical studies, but so far scholars have made surprisingly few attempts to investigate the emotions of the two cultures in comparative terms.In this innovative and timely collection, nine leading scholars make a start on that project. Topics include: differences between the Greek and Roman emotional repertoires; the semantic fields and scripts covered by comparable Greek and Latin terms; the impact of bilingualism; the fate of emotion terms in translation; the way Roman authors deal with the emotional aspects of their Greek literary models; Greek and Roman views of the emotional character of their counterparts in the other culture.
Edited by Ulrike Roth
July 5, 2010
By the Sweat of Your Brow brings together the contributions of seven scholars from the UK and the European continent on different aspects of the socio-economic setting of Roman slavery.Individual chapters discuss the slave chapter of Diocletian’s Edict on Maximum Prices, the relationship between slave and free labour, the status of managerial slaves such as vilici and dispensatores, the use of legal sources for our understanding of the role of slavery in Roman society, the unchanging nature of slave prices from classical Athens and late antique Rome, the similarity in discourse and reality of the functions carried out by estate managers in ancient Rome and modern slave and serf societies, and, last, the structural relationship between...
Edited by Edward Bispham, Greg Rowe, and Elaine Matthews
December 3, 2007
The new millennium sees both Pliny the Elder and his massive encyclopaedic Natural History being studied more seriously and holistically than at any time in the preceding century. The essays in this volume, which honour the seminal work of Barbara Levick on the politics and society of imperial Rome, above all in the period of Pliny’s life and literary activity further this re-assessment. They consider aspects of Pliny’s life and output which have not so far received serious attention. These include his value as a source for the kings of Rome and their achievements; his attitude to astronomy and natural wonders, to gentilician commemoration, philosophical sects, Roman dress and coinage; and his moral judgements on the fall of the Republic....
William D. Furley and volume editor Richard Sorabji
October 1, 1996
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a Cooley
December 12, 2000
With contributions from Edward Bispham, Guy Bradley, Alison E. Cooley, Fay Glinister, Valerie Hope, Mark Pobjoy and Benet Salway.The Epigraphic Landscape presents a series of case-studies in which a new generation of scholars examines the significance of interpreting inscriptions in terms of their topographical context and physical appearance.Some chapters focus on a genre of inscription – honorific building and funerary – whilst others discuss a single text such as the Rapino Bronze and the album of Canusium. This approach reveals the contribution of inscribed monuments to the transformation of towns and countryside and the impact of Rome on the landscape of the rest of Italy.The integration of epigraphic literary archaeological and...
Edited by Christopher Carey and Michael Edwards
December 2, 2013
Some two and a half millennia ago, in the summer of 490 BC, a small army of 9,000 Athenians, supported only be a thousand troops from Plataea, faced and overcame the might of the Persian army of King Darius I on the plain of Marathon.While this was only the beginning of the Persian Wars, and the Greeks as a while would face a far greater threat to their freedom a decade later, the victory at Marathon had untold effects on the morale, confidence, and self-esteem of the Athenians, who would commemorate their finest hour in art and literature for centuries to come.This volume, which includes twenty-one papers originally presented at a colloquium hosted by the Faculty of Philology at the University of Peloponnese, Kalamata in 2010 to mark the...
Edited by Edith Hall and Phiroze Vasunia
June 7, 2010
Edited by Chiara Thumiger
November 19, 2007
Hidden paths analyses the representation of character in Greek tragedy, focusing on one of the most important and controversial theatre plays of all times the Bacchae. Euripides’ last play has always been a favourite, enjoying an enormous success for centuries on and off the stage. This book argues that in the representation of characters in the play we can find a development in the view of self and representation of man. This development, which is also to be partly traced in the works of Sophocles and in earlier plays by Euripides, finds a fuller expression in the Bacchae and culminates in the catastrophe of ignorance and incommunicability which has Pentheus at its centre. The construction of character in the text and the view of...
Mohammad Nafissi
June 21, 2005
For over a century the foundations of Athenian political economy have been debated by scholarly camps broadly described as primitivist/substantivist, modernist and Marxist and involving political economists, sociologists and anthropologists as well as historians and classicists.Ancient Athens and modern ideology demonstrates the dialectic of intellectual and substantive history and offers a consensual resolution to the debate by examining the interplay of values, theories and evidence in the contributions of Max Weber (1864-1920), Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) and Moses Finley (1912-86), widely recognised as successive champions of the primitivist cause. Pursuing Finley’s own ‘official’ account of his intellectual roots and hegemonic...
K Shipton
November 1, 2000
Leasing and lending proposes a new approach to the cash-based economy of fourth-century Athens. Focusing on the leases of the silver mines and public land by the state, and the loans horoi set up by private individuals, the book reveals how the public and private, landed and non-landed and urban and rural economies of classical Athens were interconnected. A new methodology, which allows us to make socio-economic comparisons between the individuals involved in these major cash activities, also provides fresh insights into the social configuration of the economy.The research on which Leasing and lending is based has involved the compilation of new databases, contained in the appendices, which provide a fresh analysis...

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