Institute of Classical Studies

Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
February 14, 2009
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
Roy K. Gibson
February 1, 2007
Ovid’s Ars Amatoria has long had a reputation for ‘excess’, both moral and stylistic. Augustus’ banishment of the poet to Romania in 8 AD – for teaching ‘foul adultery’ in the Ars – is partly responsible for this reputation, along with Roman love elegy’s well-known predilection for immoderate attitudes and alienation from the values of conventional society. The Ars is undoubtedly a work of subversive tendencies, but its larger reputation has made it difficult for readers to appreciate one of the most striking, yet characteristic, features of the poem. In the pursuit of erotic ends, Ovid recommends to his pupils stratagems of moderation and self-restraint. Ovid’s (hedonistic) middle way is both a novelty for elegy, which is more accustomed...
Edited by Peter Mack and John North
May 4, 2015
Ovid was the most influential and widely imitated of all classical Latin poets. This volume publishes papers delivered at a conference on the Reception of Ovid in March 2013, jointly organised by the Institute of Classical Studies and the Warburg Institute, University of London.  It presents studies of the impact of Ovid’s work on Renaissance commentators, on neo-Latin poetry and epistolography, on Renaissance engravers, on poets like Dante, Mantuan, Pontano, Ariosto, Tasso, Spenser, Lodge, Weever, Milton and Cowley and on artists including Correggio and Rubens.  The main focus of the volume is inevitably the afterlife of the Metamorphoses but it also includes discussions of the impact of Heroides, Fasti, and Ibis, and publishes...
Edited by Peter Adamson, Rotraud Hansberger, and James Wiberding
July 7, 2014
Galen, the greatest figure in the history of pre-modern medicine, is also a significant figure in ancient philosophy. Not only is he a major source for many previous thinkers, such as the Presocratics and Stoics, but he also developed philosophical ideas of his own, in keeping with his famous dictum that ‘the best doctor is a philosopher’. This volume contributes to the growing field of research on Galen as a philosopher, with pieces devoted to his epistemology, his physics, and his theory of soul and human nature. His self-conception as a ‘philosophical’ author is also discussed, as is the question of whether his works were intended as contributions to the genre of philosophy.
Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
June 2, 2008
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
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Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
January 2, 2008
Names on Terra Sigillata is the product of 40 years of study, and records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the first to the third centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces, and Britain.With volume 9 the series is now complete: the last volume has a comprehensive index to the whole set of 9 volumes.This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian finds since then has prompted the authors to record the work of the potters in greater detail, illustrating,...
Margaret M. Roxan and Paul Holder
November 1, 2003
This volume presents 121 complete and fragmentary diplomas ranging in date from AD 61 to AD 245. 69 of these diplomas have not previously been published.These and most of the published diplomas had been worked on by Margaret Roxan. Nine have been prepared by Paul Holder who has also standardized entries and updated references and notes where necessary.Among the appendixes and indexes are a new ‘Revised chronology of diplomas’ and updated witness lists.This volume continues Margaret Roxan’s Roman Military Diplomas 1954–77 (1978), 1978-84 (1985) and 1985-93 (1994) which were published as Occasional Papers (Nos 2, 9 and 14) of the Institute of Archaeology, University of London. This new volume, volume IV, follows...
Edited by Richard Green and Mike Edwards
January 12, 2015
This volume in honour of the late Eric Handley, one-time Regius Professor of Greek at the University of Cambridge and Director of the Institute of Classical Studies, offers a set of essays connected with Eric’s main scholarly interests and written by friends, colleagues, and former students.Eric’s great love and facility for piecing the past together from whatever fragments of it survive, be they papyri or pots, in different ways inspired all the contributors, and their affection for him is encapsulated in a final Tribute to one of the pre-eminent classical scholars of his day.
Anastasia Bakogianni
January 16, 2012
Electra is a unique, complex, and fascinating Greek tragic heroine, who became a source of inspiration for countless playwrights, artists, musicians and filmmakers. The daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra she famously supported her brother’s quest to avenge their father’s murder even at the cost of matricide. Her passion for justice and her desire for vengeance have echoed down the centuries to the modern era.Enshrined as the mourner of Greek tragedy par excellence Electra has enjoyed a long and rich reception history.Electra, ancient and modern, examines the treatment of Electra by all three ancient tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, and their dialogue with the mythical tradition that preceded them. The focus then shifts...

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