Institute of Classical Studies

Edited by Errietta M. A. Bissa and Federico Santangelo
July 1, 2016
In this volume, seven authors offer distinctive insights into overarching issues in the study of wealth across the Greco-Roman worlds: the sources and maintenance of wealth; the implications for differently organised societies of the division between wealthy and impoverished individuals and groups; and the moral implications of that divide. Some papers address general methodological issues and engage with scholarly debates in sociology and economic theory; others focus on specific historical problems and clusters of evidence. Taken together, the papers open up new perspectives on wealth in the ancient world, its complex relationship with power, and the tensions and contradictions it entails.
Edited by Richard Hobbs
April 8, 2013
Currency & exchange in ancient Pompeii examines how coinage became a key component of the economic life of the town from the third century BC to the dramatic destruction of Pompeii by the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79. The study discusses one of the largest assemblages of coins found so far from below the layer of destruction of AD 79. Over 1,500 coins were found during a ten-year campaign of excavation of Regio VI, Insula 1 by the Anglo-American Project in Pompeii (AAPP). Currency & exchange in ancient Pompeii  looks at the range of coins found, from mints across the Mediterranean, reflecting Pompeii’s wide-ranging trade connections, in particular, Ebusus, Massalia, and Rome, and the development of local imitations,...
Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
July 5, 2010
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
Edited by Richard Sorabji
October 10, 1997
A selection of papers given at the Institute of Classical Studies during 1996. They cover a variety of new work on the 900 years of philosophy from Aristotle to Simplicius. There is a strong concentration on stoicism with papers by: Michael Frede ( Euphrates of Tyre ); A. A. Long ( Property ownership and community ); Brad Inwood ( 'Why do fools fallin love?' ); Susanne Bobzein ( freedom and ethics ); Richard Gaskin ( cases, predicates and the unity of the proposition ); Richard Sorabji ( stoic philosophy and psychotherapy ); Bernard Williams ( reply to Richard Sorabji ). The other papers are by: Heinrich von Staden ( Galen and the 'Second Sophistic' ); Hans B. Gottschalk ( continuity and change in Aristotelianism ); Travis Butler ( the...
Edited by Robert W. Sharples and Anne Sheppard
July 1, 2003
Twelve academic essays, given during the Institute of Classical Studies research seminar in 2000 and 2001, examine Plato's vision of the `real world' as he presented it in Timaeus while considering the text's influence on classical philosophers and scientists. Specific subjects include astronomy, the reactions of Aristotle and others to Timaeus , Hellenistic musicology, Proclus' Commentary , comparisons with Aristotle's Physics and mythology.
Edited by Tesse D. Stek and Gert-Jan Burgers
March 2, 2015
This publication of the School of Advanced Study of the University of London is one of the outcomes of the Landscapes of Early Roman Colonization project and the Colonial Rural Networks project (NWO, Dr. T.D. Stek). The volume, edited by Tesse Stek and prof. Gert-Jan Burgers of the Free University Amsterdam, explores the role of religion in early Roman imperialism. The impact of Roman imperialism and expansionism on religious life in the newly incorporated areas has often been regarded as minimal, following the axiom of Roman ‘religious tolerance’. However, literary and epigraphic evidence points at the political and ideological importance of cult sites especially in conflict situations. Moreover, incisive changes in religious practices as...
Edited by Christopher A. Faraone
December 17, 2012
Greek magical texts sometimes contain peculiar triangular formations created by repeating the same word over and over again in the same column, but leaving off one letter at the beginning or end (or both). Interpretations shifted during the twentieth century: did the words inscribed in these shapes represent the names of diseases or evil demons which were forced to disappear as each letter of the name does? Or were they the work of Roman period scribes representing very different notions? This new study uses a masterly survey of the known examples of these texts to argue for a radical revision of recent views.
Edited by Brian R. Hartley and Brenda M. Dickinson
May 10, 2010
Names on Terra Sigillata, the product of 40 years of study, records over 5,000 names and some 300,000 stamps and signatures on Terra Sigillata (samian ware) manufactured in the 1st to the 3rd centuries AD in Gaul, the German provinces and Britain.To be published in 10 volumes, the work has been supported by the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the University of Leeds and the University of Reading, and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum. This is the first catalogue of its type to appear since Felix Oswald’s Index of Potters’ Stamps on Terra Sigillata (‘Samian Ware’), published in 1931. The importance of samian as a tool for dating archaeological contexts and the vast increase in samian...
Edited by Tim Cornell, B Rankov, and P Sabin
October 10, 1996
Edited by Peter Adamson, Han Baltussen, and M.W.F. Stone
January 1, 2005
This two volume Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies represents the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute on 27-29 June, 2002 in honour of Richard Sorabji.These volumes, which are intended to build on the massive achievement of Professor Sorabji’s Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series, focus on the commentary as a vehicle of philosophical and scientific thought.

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