News

Explore Layers of London – a new digital platform enabling you to peel back the layers of London’s history to discover its people and places, and to share your own stories

Friday 21 September 2018
Institute of Historical Research
Did you know that in East London in 1954 you could barter a Christmas cake for a chicken for a Christmas dinner? Or that 35 years earlier a white cross painted by your door guaranteed you’d be woken up for work? Or that on 17th century maps, today’s Oxford Street was simply ‘the Road to Oxford’? Would you like to see a photo of London’s first housing estate? Have you got your own stories and memories you’d like to share?

Philip Murphy to oversee boost to doctoral training funded by AHRC

Tuesday 4 September 2018
Professor Philip Murphy from the School of Advanced Study ( SAS ), University of London, has been confirmed as the new interim director of the London Arts and Humanities Partnership ( LAHP ) for the 2018–19 academic year. He will undertake this role on a 0.5 basis while continuing to serve as director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ) at SAS.

Professor Hussey on ‘The Queen’s Embroiderer’ and ‘Algiers, Third World Capital'

Wednesday 22 August 2018
School of Advanced Study
Andrew Hussey , the School of Advanced Study’s professor of cultural history, reviews Joan DeJean’s new novel, ‘The Queen’s Embroiderer’, for the Financial Times (behind a paywall), and Elaine Mokhtefi’s ‘Algiers, Third World Capital: Freedom Fighters, Revolutionaries, Black Panthers’ for the New Statesman .

Promotions for SAS experts in Commonwealth and human rights

Friday 17 August 2018
School of Advanced Study
The School of Advanced Study ( SAS ), University of London, has announced the promotion of three distinguished academics recognised for their work in law, Commonwealth studies, human rights and refugee protection.

Gender identity legal expert to join School of Advanced Study

Wednesday 15 August 2018
Professor Carl Stychin (left) has been appointed director of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and professor of law with effect from 1 January 2019. He will succeed Jules Winterton who has led the institute, a member of the School of Advanced Study ( SAS ), University of London, for five years. Professor Stychin is currently professor of law at City, University of London, a position he will relinquish on 31 December 2018.

Heroes or villains: can historians decide?  

Wednesday 25 July 2018
Institute of Historical Research
How far should history be re-written in accordance with changing values? Should we apologise for historical wrongs? These are two of the issues examined by a new book written by some of the UK’s leading historians.

University of London appoints Michael Hayman as Honorary Professor of the Purpose Economy

Wednesday 18 July 2018
The University of London today announces the appointment of the entrepreneur and author Michael Hayman (left) as Honorary Professor of the Purpose Economy, working within the School of Advanced Study ( SAS ). The five-year appointment, made by the University of London’s Collegiate Council, will focus on the relationship between profit and purpose and how UK prosperity can be boosted by socially motivated businesses. Mr Hayman will also lead research into the factors that might accelerate the financial contribution and social impact of the purpose economy.

EuroHaptics 2018 award for ground-breaking new deafblind communication device

Monday 9 July 2018
Institute of Philosophy
Vincent Hayward , Leverhulme Visiting Professor at the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ), School of Advanced Study, has won the best hands-on demonstration award at the 2018 EuroHaptics international conference for a device that that will help deafblind people communicate remotely.

Distant learning: objects falling slower than expected makes us feel taller

Thursday 28 June 2018
Institute of Philosophy
Believe it or not, your hearing has a lot to do with how tall you feel you are according to new research Our perceptions of our height are based on lifetimes of sensory feedback. But researchers have found that disrupting auditory feedback can confuse us into re-evaluating how tall we think we are. Sound and object motion can be used to change perceptions of our own bodies, according to a new study by an international team involving researchers from the School of Advanced Study (SAS), University of London. 

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