SAS in the media

Human rights implications of shale gas production

Tuesday 4 August 2015
Human Rights Consortium
The attendance of Dr Damien Short , director of the Human Rights Commission ( HRC ), at London’s 2015 Shale Gas Environmental Summit features in OilEcho.com . The article confirms Dr Short will discuss the human rights implications of shale gas production at the event (26–27 October) by exploring what the biggest risks are, how they are being dealt with and, looking to the future, how they can be mitigated. Read the article on OilEcho.com 

Go-betweens for Hitler

Thursday 30 July 2015
Institute of Historical Research
Go-betweens for Hitler, written by Dr Karina Urbach , senior research fellow at the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ), is highlighted in a Herald Scotland ‘essay of the week’ feature. The article agrees with Dr Urbach, who uncovered two shadowy characters who epitomise the curious flirtation between the Royals and the Nazis during the 1930s while researching the book, that the royal archives should be opened for wider inspection. Read the full article in Herald Scotland  

ICWS fellow comments on Botswana's conservation strategy

Tuesday 28 July 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Keith Somerville, fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), says evidence points to a mixed picture of success for Botswana’s conservation strategy. His analysis on All Africa.com discussing the country’s advances in conserving key habitats and species, highlights regional failures and community grievances at a hunting ban that can’t be ignored.

Stuck between two promises

Tuesday 28 July 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor James Manor, Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ) fellow, writes in Nikkei Asian Review that India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi, is caught between two worthy but contradictory aspirations – tackling corruption and bureaucratic paralysis. He says the prime minister is discovering that the pursuit of the first goal is ‘impeding efforts to achieve the second’. Read the full story in Nikkei Asian Review   

Censorship and the royal archives

Tuesday 28 July 2015
Institute of Historical Research
Dr Karina Urbach , senior research fellow at the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ), speaks to U.S. News about her new book, Go-Betweens for Hitler , and censorship of the royal archives. Dr Urbach says whatever the archives reveal about past occupants of the palace, it’s unlikely they would threaten today’s royal family. ‘The younger generation had nothing to do with it. But it is embarrassing for the older generation. It casts them in a light that they don't want to be seen in.’  Read the article in U.S. News   

What the royal family can learn from M15 about secrecy

Wednesday 22 July 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
The debate about the access (or lack of) to the royal archives conjures up a certain sense of déjà vu for Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ). In ‘What the royal family can learn from MI5 about secrecy’ for The Conversation , he remembers how ‘20 years ago, the archives of the British intelligence services were surrounded by a similar smokescreen’, which caused ‘the same sort of frustration to historians’.

Professor Philip Murphy comments on ‘prevent’ programme

Wednesday 22 July 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), features in a BBC Radio 4 (at 24:23) investigation into the government’s plans to criminalise the activities of those classed as non-violent extremists.

Lancashire’s fracking victory greater than anticipated

Wednesday 22 July 2015
Human Rights Consortium
Dr Damien Short , director of the Human Rights Consortium ( HRC ), writes in The Ecologist that Lancashire’s fracking victory earlier this month was even greater than anticipated. ‘The anti-fracking movement scored a great victory when Lancashire councillors refused planning permission for two fracking wells’, says Dr Short. ‘But dig deeper and the triumph was all the greater, as it overcame not just Cuadrilla, but a morass of pro-fracking bias and legal and scientific misrepresentation from those meant to be providing impartial advice.’

Shrines are about stones, not bones

Wednesday 22 July 2015
Institute of English Studies
Professor Warwick Gould , senior researcher at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), features in an Irish Times article discussing recently discovered French documents relating to the authenticity of the remains purporting to be those of renowned poet WB Yeats. On the question of possible DNA analysis of the bones buried at Drumcliffe, Professor Gould says Yeats’s grave is a shrine, and ‘shrines are about stones, not bones. Their symbolic significance designedly outlives human remains, which rot. Read the article in the Irish Time s

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